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blunderfull

Windward Passage

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Saw her out today - very briefly.   Motored down to Turning Basin, swung around and raised a grey headsail.  I headed down the waterfront for pics but by then she had struck the sail and returned to her slip.   Small crew, 3-4 on deck.  Testing something?

Have yet to see her under sail.  Anyone know what’s up?

 

6B9A138F-67FE-4A34-8B8F-C641AE934F1F.jpeg

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She's been out in front of (what used to be?) Ardell's for years.  Out and about every once in a while.  Absolutely gorgeous condition.

BTW, that picture you posted is WP-II.  Very different boat.

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10 minutes ago, sledracr said:

She's been out in front of (what used to be?) Ardell's for years.  Out and about every once in a while.  Absolutely gorgeous condition.

BTW, that picture you posted is WP-II.  Very different boat.

Ok sorry about the pic.   Did look a lot beefier than WP I 

Yea, I usually stop up on Kings Road for lunch.   Can see her from there but, in the years she’s been there I’ve never seen her out.


Here we go:

 

 

AE2C5CCB-5EAB-40BD-99E6-C508280EF127.jpeg

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Do we know how much they were gaining with these multiple spinnakers ?

 

From one to two, and from two with the little one added ?

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Interior of Passage looking magnificent these days; much nicer than when I last saw it at the infamous 1985 Dock Party in Hobart. There were clouds of white dust and winch handles disappearing before my very eyes on that night. If WP could only speak, what tales she could tell.

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On ‎11‎/‎28‎/‎2019 at 11:21 AM, OW1981 said:

Out of interest whatever happened to WP-11? 

Last I heard she was in Italy and called Il Moro de Venezia...… that was like 25 years ago though.

She was the prettiest maxi going when she was launched IMHO and was my dream boat as a 12 year old boy! Her predecessor WP1 certainly holds her age well, much better than most boats ever will, a timeless classic.

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On 11/28/2019 at 8:05 AM, Last Post said:

Interior of Passage looking magnificent these days; much nicer than when I last saw it at the infamous 1985 Dock Party in Hobart. There were clouds of white dust and winch handles disappearing before my very eyes on that night. If WP could only speak, what tales she could tell.

Disappearing huh? What kind of winch handles were these?

Image result for winch handle harken

image_2013-09-11--1.jpg 

41-AkR0lpvL.jpg 

 

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3 hours ago, jackolantern said:

Disappearing huh? What kind of winch handles were these?

Image result for winch handle harken

image_2013-09-11--1.jpg 

41-AkR0lpvL.jpg 

 

and importantly, which end disappeared first?

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Having seen the fabled triple handed winch handle do it's justifiably famous disappearing act in Southport,  I'm guessing handle #2.

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On 12/2/2019 at 10:40 AM, TUBBY said:

Having seen the fabled triple handed winch handle do it's justifiably famous disappearing act in Southport,  I'm guessing handle #2.

Agree, No 2, the preferred choice for fit and comfort. The other two handles shown were not around in 1985 although the recipient probably would have been able to "handle" either of them, such was her capacity. Still makes my eyes water  to think about it after all those years.

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Here is WP plan from Yachting mag, 1969: This was the original. Have only seen the boat once, in St. Pete, ca 1970s.

WP:3:69.jpeg

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When I managed Mariners Mile Shipyard in the 90's; the interior refinish of Windward Passage was one of my favorite projects. It is absolutely immaculate down below even if you pull the bilge boards up. Every nook and cranny was given great attention. 

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On 12/4/2019 at 10:45 AM, Last Post said:

Agree, No 2, the preferred choice for fit and comfort. The other two handles shown were not around in 1985 although the recipient probably would have been able to "handle" either of them, such was her capacity. Still makes my eyes water  to think about it after all those years.

Don't understand why it would make your eyes water. To do that trick you had to have a cunt, not be one.

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Didn’t she hold the record for the Miami to Jamaica for fastest elapsed time for like 30 years?

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I have sailed on WP in Noumea after her complete renovation in New-zealand. Inside and outside was luxury but still a very big and heavy boat to sail on....

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Helped deliver her from Honolulu to San Fransicko via Kauai, in August 1980, after the Pan Am Clipper Cup.  It was a simple configuration- double spreader rig, Dacron sails, only hydraulics was the backstay; a giant freezer and refrigerator was loaded up with enough food, wine & beer for 2 trips.  Six of us aboard.  The skipper, Dave Birchenoff (sp?) and the mate (Ari Steinberg) were both veterans of the '79 Whitbread Race.  The former was awesome- a real leader; the latter was the biggest douche I ever sailed with- giant ego, socially inept and just totally unpleasant without letup, otherwise it was an incredible experience.

If you look at the drawing of the boat posted above, compare it to an Islander 36.  Identical hull shapes and sail plan.

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On 4/7/2020 at 11:29 AM, Rude Dog said:

Helped deliver her from Honolulu to San Fransicko via Kauai, in August 1980, after the Pan Am Clipper Cup.  It was a simple configuration- double spreader rig, Dacron sails, only hydraulics was the backstay; a giant freezer and refrigerator was loaded up with enough food, wine & beer for 2 trips.  Six of us aboard.  The skipper, Dave Birchenoff (sp?) and the mate (Ari Steinberg) were both veterans of the '79 Whitbread Race.  The former was awesome- a real leader; the latter was the biggest douche I ever sailed with- giant ego, socially inept and just totally unpleasant without letup, otherwise it was an incredible experience.

If you look at the drawing of the boat posted above, compare it to an Islander 36.  Identical hull shapes and sail plan.

Hi, who was the owner at that time? I know the johnson family really well, Mark gave me a framed photo that is hanging in my house.

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On 4/7/2020 at 11:29 AM, Rude Dog said:

Helped deliver her from Honolulu to San Fransicko via Kauai, in August 1980, after the Pan Am Clipper Cup.  It was a simple configuration- double spreader rig, Dacron sails, only hydraulics was the backstay; a giant freezer and refrigerator was loaded up with enough food, wine & beer for 2 trips.  Six of us aboard.  The skipper, Dave Birchenoff (sp?) and the mate (Ari Steinberg) were both veterans of the '79 Whitbread Race.  The former was awesome- a real leader; the latter was the biggest douche I ever sailed with- giant ego, socially inept and just totally unpleasant without letup, otherwise it was an incredible experience.

If you look at the drawing of the boat posted above, compare it to an Islander 36.  Identical hull shapes and sail plan.

I agree 100% about Dave B.  A full-on good bloke, and a great sailor.  I didn't know Ari.  But from what you say, that may have been a mercy.

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15 years or so ago I met Ari through work, we worked on a project together.  He always seemed like a good dude to me and my team liked him. He was easy to work with. Never went sailing with him although we talked about it a lot.

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Have not checked back on this board until today.

Seeing the 2 comments following my post really makes me appreciate the tremendous reach that SA has, connecting sailors from all around the world and providing a great platform to obtain news, exchange information, tidbits, gossip- whatever- about all things sailing.  I have to hand it to the editor- your website provides an amazing service to our sport and is why all serious sailors around the globe check out SA daily.  I know I do.

Regarding the last post above- wow- small world!  It sounds like the guy I mentioned eventually grew up and perhaps learned to be more humble and nice.  I can tell you I hold no grudge, as I have learned that one of the greatest virtues we can develop is the capacity to forgive; for his unspeakably poor behavior to me those many decades ago, I forgive the guy completely.  Case closed. 

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While WP was and still is amazing... I really very much preferred Blackfin.

Passage was a fast but ill handling beast in big seas, due to the huge changes in underwater shape as it went through a seaway. As we would drive over a big Pacific swell, first the leeward stanchions would go under -- lots of weather helm -- then the leeward rail would become quite clear of the water, boat almost on its lines -- so suddenly no weather helm. With every swell.

@Rude Dog, do you remember how much helm one needed sailing close hauled or reaching? 90-120 degrees of wheel movement on every swell.

Meanwhile, Blackfin had a more rounded cross section, almost like a modern multihull. So going through a seaway, in any direction, was pretty sweet. Could and did have competitions of running from the helm to the headstay and back while surfing under spinnaker.

Oddly, both had reasonably light helms. Big wheels! Low friction throughout. So good feel. I mean, you would get a workout, but we were all young way back then.

And of course the way the "crew cockpit" on Passage would get filled with water with every big wave. I mean filled! Like the entire wave would be directed up into the air, and then directly into the crew cockpit. Pretty spectacular. Made timing essential to use the companionway at the forward end of the crew cockpit.

Oh: Another good thing about heavy air in BF over WP: By connecting the two wheels together, so both rudders turned together, big breaking waves would not injure the driver. One evening sailing out the Solent in wind against tide, one helmsman did NOT link the rudders, and a breaking sea hit the aft rudder, pulling the helmsman from the leeward side of the helm cockpit over the top of the wheel into a face plant on the teak grate cockpit sole on the windward side. Nearly knocked him out! Messed up his face for months. I don't remember anyone really getting thrown by the WP rudder, which was somewhat balanced.

Also, what surprised me was that WP had the advantage upwind, and BF was faster downwind. WP had more stability! BF had a lower drag shape.

Both had inane prop installations: WP with the retractable, requiring very low speeds under power and essentially stopping when raising or lowering; BF with the prop in the aperture. At least the aperture was in front of the "trim tab" so maneuverability under power was pretty darn good.

And of course, Blackfin was a luxurious yacht below deck, very dry, good ventilation, even forced air heat. Except for that time we nearly sank mid Atlantic ...

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