yl75

Spindrift 2 2019 Jules Verne attempt

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There seems to be a nice window shaping up around Sunday 1 , Monday Tuesday.

Hope they take it (if they don't, questionable if they really want to go ...)

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/trophee-jules-verne/trophee-jules-verne-yann-guichard-spindrift-en-stand-by-le-plus-gros-risque-c-est-un-ofni-62dc2788-102e-11ea-aff8-b1a3d2598acf

I think this is new. Rough translation only. 

Yann Guichard, skipper of the maxi-trimaran 40 meters Spindrift 2, has granted us an informative interview. The crew could go to the Jules Verne Trophy at the end of the week in Brest, if the weather window - a mouse hole - wants to open. Goal: to break the world tour record held by Francis Joyon (IDEC Sport) in 40 days and 23 hours. But how is it organized onboard the largest oceanic multihull on the planet and what are the risks?

You had to stop your stand-by for a while. Why ?

Yann Guichard: We had a problem with the rudders - a tip problem that could have worsened at high speed. On this type of boat, it takes time to repair and it took three weeks. It's done, and we are waiting again in Brest since yesterday Monday.

There are situations where we go 3 to 3,5 knots faster than before thanks to the combination of foil and rudders

there have been changes on Spindrift 2?

Yann Guichard: No. The only novelty is that we can modify the rake of rudders. This allows under strong conditions to change the trim a little and navigate more "aerial" by relieving the float. In fact when you have foils that lift upwards, the bows are naturally relieved, but since you do not have much behind, it's a little "dragster" and you're driving up! By modifying this rake, we can raise the float a bit and reduce the wet surface and the drag. So, there are speeds where we go 3 to 3.5 knots faster than before thanks to the combination of foil and rudders.

There were opportunities to leave during this project?

Yann Guichard: In fact, the only opportunity was possibly November 5 when the departure of Brest Atlantiques took place in strong wind and big sea. We would have gone very quickly indeed, but since the four Ultims then found part of the South Atlantic to be upwind in harsher conditions, it would not have worked. We have no regrets. 

How is this waiting period for the crew?

Yann Guichard: It's not easy. You are waiting at your place. We meet with the entire crew once or twice a week to do sports together, but everyone is preparing physically and mentally for his part everyday. We scrutinize the weather, and as we have longer-term visibility and improve every year, we look at ten days to see if there is an opportunity to leave or not. We must stay focused. You are in the race without starting. 

Do you have daily exchanges with Jean-Yves Bernot, your router?

Yann Guichard: Jean-Yves (Bernot) sends a daily weather point to Erwan (Israel) the navigator, then we discuss it together if things are more precise.

And you have a protocol with the crew in relation to a possible departure?

Yann Guichard: Yes. There are red, orange, green codes for go. Me, I send every day an email with a brief weather situation and a word like "no departure in five days ..." But it is not because there is no departure within five days you should not be involved. It's really restrictive for everyone. You can not go for a walk at the end of the world ... You must be ready to join the boat within 24 hours even if for five days it was said that there was no potential departure.

It must be quite difficult to live?

Yann Guichard: I'm not hiding that it's long enough to wait from October to January. You can not plan anything else, so it's pretty hard to live, especially when there are no opportunities. But that's the record of the records. With the rudder problems we had, we decided to postpone this stand-by until mid-December.

Compared to the original crew and the hard core, there are new ones?

Yann Guichard: Yes. Corentin Horeau replaces Sam Goodchild and Greg Gendron Christophe Espagnon. They are very good. I'm not worried. Otherwise we were all on board last year.

Everyone takes turns depending on the conditions, but this is not the competition for the one who will beat the speed record. 

How are the twelve organized?

Yann Guichard: I'm off-watch like Erwan (Israel) the navigator. The other ten work in pairs. So there are five of them. Four people are on deck, two on stand-by and four at rest. But we do not work like the "French" with quarters of four that change suddenly. It's a little complicated to explain, but we prefer pairs that are twice 96 minutes on the deck before being replaced by those who were on stand-by. This stand-by quarter is alert 48 minutes before and 48 minutes after. So it's three rotations in 24 hours. It may seem odd, but one is doing very well, and two you never have four new guys on the deck. It is important to have this continuity in the settings and the performance of the boat.

You Helm a lot?

Yann Guichard: Not very much in fact. Everyone takes turns depending on the conditions, but this is not the competition to whoever will beat the speed record. Me, I take the helm on the maneuvers like the gybes or the changes of sails. For reefing, shift leaders are at the helm. Like everyone else, I spend a lot of time on the winch column.

How many days of food have you planned?

Yann Guichard: We're leaving with 41 days of refueling ... so with two days of rab. Now, if we have to ration a little on the end because the weather has meant we are not on time, we will not starve.

What is the weight?

Yann Guichard: 600 kilos! We are lighter by more than half a ton, and it is felt on the performance.

We saw that on the Transat Jacques Vabre and Brest Atlantiques, there were many collisions with UFOs. Can we imagine that it is a permanent fear?

Yann Guichard: This is not new and today it is the first cause of abandonment. When you hit something at high speed, the damage is important. Today, we do not have an effective system. This will probably exist someday. François Gabart on Macif when he went around the world in 42 days, returned without having problems with his appendages, but during the last races, we saw that it was a real worry. And we must add that with these huge foils and boards and rudders , you multiply the risks. We could consider having sonar, but as the boats fly and there is no small size available we must forget it. There have been tests of infrared camera and Marc Guillemot worked on it with Safran. Everyone would have to work together to find a reliable system. And if you go at 40 knots, you need something that can detect an UFO or a fish well beyond 200 meters because otherwise it is already too late to react.

do you think the oceans are getting dirtier?

Yann Guichard: I'm not able to verify it, but there are not just containers or logs that are lying in the water. There are many marine mammals that are hit. It's sad for the boat, but also for them. It hurts them, especially since they have not asked for anything and are at home! And in the big South, you have more chances to meet them. 

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39 minutes ago, SCARECROW said:

I have no idea why but this team just doesn't excite me.

Because they keep failing for one reason or another.! Is this 3rd time lucky? If my memory serves me right but feel free to correct me please...;)

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5 hours ago, SCARECROW said:

I have no idea why but this team just doesn't excite me.

They seem to have more money than interest

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3 hours ago, QBF said:

They seem to have more money than interest

Their project doesn't include much communication. They don't participate in major offshore event. Therefore they keep the image of the wealthy owner that bought a (very) big boat, racing for their own interest without sharing much. Add a few unfortunate event that could be related to amateurism (VOR Lorient 2012 and dismasting just leaving Brest harbor) and you have the perfect combo !

I believe if they win the Jules Verne, they would  finally get respect from the offshore scene

To compare, Gitana while being also very wealthy, has a totally different reputation.

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Plus they lack focus somehow, discovering the new rudder issue that late, and saying they are on stand only till mid December because after there is the TF35 circuit on the Leman lake doesn't show complete commitment

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On 11/26/2019 at 11:22 AM, yl75 said:

There seems to be a nice window shaping up around Sunday 1 , Monday Tuesday.

Hope they take it (if they don't, questionable if they really want to go ...)

That potential window to go on Sunday is still there but the trade winds look bad later in the week.  No posts from the team on their website or FB.  Not that that is anything new.  

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4 hours ago, jb5 said:

That potential window to go on Sunday is still there but the trade winds look bad later in the week.  No posts from the team on their website or FB.  Not that that is anything new.  

It doesn't look too bad to me (if they start at the very beginning of the window), they should be past Gibraltar latitude very quickly, and then the trades are ok at least along the African coast and the canaries, the current Ushant to Equator record is 4d20h (Spindrift last attempt), so they can be fast, as to the doldrums and beginning south Atlantic, they probably will need to get very close to Brazil (around Friday 6th), but then a low seems catchable.

They clearly should go anyway, btw, the top part of the V&V article you linked above, hints at them going for this window.

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1 hour ago, yl75 said:

They clearly should go anyway, btw, the top part of the V&V article you linked above, hints at them going for this window.

Whether they leave will probably come down to what is on TV Sunday night

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3 hours ago, yl75 said:

It doesn't look too bad to me (if they start at the very beginning of the window), they should be past Gibraltar latitude very quickly, and then the trades are ok at least along the African coast and the canaries, the current Ushant to Equator record is 4d20h (Spindrift last attempt), so they can be fast, as to the doldrums and beginning south Atlantic, they probably will need to get very close to Brazil (around Friday 6th), but then a low seems catchable.

They clearly should go anyway, btw, the top part of the V&V article you linked above, hints at them going for this window.

https://instagram.com/stories/spindrift_racing/2187146603614683107?utm_source=ig_story_item_share&igshid=1fd7jd70no86g

Indeed. Dona B on IG saying possible start this weekend. Last training video shots on the link. 

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On 11/28/2019 at 1:14 AM, yl75 said:

Plus they lack focus somehow, discovering the new rudder issue that late, and saying they are on stand only till mid December because after there is the TF35 circuit on the Leman lake doesn't show complete commitment

Agreed I'm not aware of who is running their campaign or their boat but the passion needs to extend to making the boat better and sailing more often. Yeah they are unique in terms of owning and running a boat of this size. 

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10 hours ago, yl75 said:

Wow, nice catch ! how did you find that one ? Following DB on IG ? :)

:) Its on Dona B's IG blog under Spindrift.  Nothing on the Spindrift's IG in either posts or blog that I can see. Typical.

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But Spindrift is still in La Trinité :

media_1575046806.jpg

wtf are they doing ...

 

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12 minutes ago, yl75 said:

But Spindrift is still in La Trinité :

media_1575046806.jpg

wtf are they doing ...

 

The usual. Nothing. :o

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Just took another look at Windy...It still looks possible by leaving Sunday. They have to go almost all the way west after the Canaries and Thursday looks difficult around the equator but hopefully past it by then?  I would think Monday would be too late.

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1 hour ago, yl75 said:

But Spindrift is still in La Trinité :

media_1575046806.jpg

wtf are they doing ...

 

Nice picture by the way !

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17 hours ago, Ahstom said:

Nice picture by the way !

Indeed was surprised. It's from the webcam, and they are still there ....

media_1575115207.jpg

With a more typical Brittany weather ;)

https://www.viewsurf.com/univers/plage/vue/6584-france-bretagne-la-trinite-sur-mer-panoramique-hd

or :

http://pv.viewsurf.com/?id=284

 

If they don't even have a go at this window (even up to the cape for instance), would say something is not going smoothly in that team, how can they expect something better till mid december ?

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They are being even more annoying than usual. Time to f'n go or admit to, 5/6 years?, with nothing worthwhile to show for it and leave it to someone serious. 

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6 minutes ago, jb5 said:

They are being even more annoying than usual. Time to f'n go or admit to, 5/6 years?, with nothing worthwhile to show for it and leave it to someone serious. 

That's the beauty of being a privately backed team, they can do what they want, when they want, without having to placate sponsors & nobodies on the internet.

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On 11/30/2019 at 7:01 PM, Your Mom said:

FWIW, Tuesday morning also has a decent window.

Indeed could be, but the doldrums after 4 days look worse than if they did start Sunday early, but maybe better for the beginning south Atlantic ? Not sure ...

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12 hours ago, yl75 said:

Indeed could be, but the doldrums after 4 days look worse than if they did start Sunday early, but maybe better for the beginning south Atlantic ? Not sure ...

Don't hold your breath, as of this morning (December 2nd) Spindrift 2 is still at their dock in La Trinité sur Mer

1488156262_Spindrift2stillinLaTrinitsurMer.thumb.png.8521241add7a3f9121ae37eb5a1247b1.png

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It rarely fails, whenever I post as I did above, the opposite soon happens!  Just checked La Trinité sur Mer and there is someone on board.

Spindrift.png.7eb94589ada6dee92d041ee057f69ad4.png

 

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Let's hope this one is the good one. It could be the last opportunity with that boat.

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Good luck to them. They've had rotten luck with the beast. I'm pretty sure it can beat Groupama 3 or whatever it's called now, it's had more than enough upgrades. Last hurrah of the 'displacement' maxi tri's. (designed with c foils from the outset). If they don't make it just sell it to another billionaire in the Caribbean or whatever and build a fully crewed foiling beast. If the ultime's are going this fast with 1 dude. Imagine the same generation but designed for crews from the outset. 

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2 hours ago, QBF said:

It rarely fails, whenever I post as I did above, the opposite soon happens!  Just checked La Trinité sur Mer and there is someone on board.

Spindrift.png.7eb94589ada6dee92d041ee057f69ad4.png

 

Hooray !!

So I guess they will go straight from La Trinité to the start line, no stop in Brest

 

Still at the dock at the moment, nice weather :

media_1575306007.jpg

 

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Quote

Spindrift 2 is preparing for a new attempt on the Jules Verne Trophy, the round the world record that starts and finishes in Ushant, leaving the three capes (Good Hope, Leeuwin, Horn) to port. The reference time is the current record set by Francis Joyon and his crew in 2017, of 40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes and 30 seconds. With their optimised maxi trimaran and a crew of eleven, skipper Yann Guichard is aiming to start this new attempt on the night of Tuesday 3 to Wednesday, 4 December.
 
Yann Guichard and crew will cross the line during the night of December 4th,  in front of the Créac'h lighthouse (Ushant) to begin the 21,600 mile route (following the Great Circle, which is the direct route chosen by the WSSRC, the international organisation that ratifies sailing records), with the aim of beating the record of 40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes and 30 seconds.  Based on its performance on a previous attempt, the black and gold trimaran could have the record on target, especially given recent technical improvements to the trimaran, including setting rudder fins to better sustain the Spindrift 2 at high speed.
 
A third attempt
Yann Guichard and his crew have tried to beat the record on two previous occasions: in 2015 (47d 10h 59 ') with Dona Bertarelli, who became the fastest woman around the world, and in 2018 (where the team was forced to abandon their attempt following rudder failure close to the Kergulen Islands). However now, once again, the North Atlantic has a favourable weather window that could allow a passage to the equator in about five days.
"We will start from La Trinité on Tuesday morning to cross the starting line of the Jules Verne Trophy at Ushant between 18:00 on Tuesday and 6:00 on Wednesday: once we see how the weather is evolving, we will be able to refine this window. The conditions are quite good, with a time at the equator of around five days.  We should be able to leave the eastern sector in the Bay of Biscay with a moderate breeze and then we will benefit from trade winds that ill strengthen to the north of Portugal. We will have make some gybes to get to Madeira before performing our swoop down into the doldrums." Says Yann Guichard.
But if the descent to the Equator looks favourable, the round the world record can still be lost at the Cape of Good Hope. Spindrift 2 already holds the fastest time between Ushant and the Equator made during the second attempt in early 2019 (4d 20h 07 '), but it is the ability to improve the reference time to the Cape of Good Hope and arrive at the Indian Ocean with time in hand that is critical. Francis Joyon had an extremely fast crossing of this second ocean in 2017 (5d 21h 07 '). Spindrift 2 must therefore keep to an average speed of about 23 knots to South Africa, to ensure that there is enough margin on the reference time to start the next section.
 
North-South sequence 
"The doldrums seem more favourable to the East as we have seen during the recent Transat Jacques Vabre and Brest Atlantiques. To get into the Southern Hemisphere in good shape: we hope to pass the Cape of Good Hope in less than thirteen days, which would allow us to be ahead of Francis Joyon’s time. While it is still a bit far out, we can already see that the South Atlantic is not closed and we could hook into a depression off Brazil to arrive on South Africa quite quickly.” Says the skipper of the black and gold trimaran.
Spindrift 2 is ready for this new attempt with a total crew of twelve, including two newcomers: Grégory Gendron and Corentin Horeau., who know the boat well and are already well integrated into the team. "We will leave with conditions more pleasant than usual, and the day after the start, it will not be as cold ... It is a fairly standard route but we hope it will be rather fast -  to the equator at least!" Concludes Yann Guichard.

https://www.spindrift-racing.com/news/jules-verne-trophy-tuesday-night-departure-spindrift-2

Why do they omit the attempt where they broke the mast just out of Brest ? ;)

That's a Fourth attempt !

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Main being raised at the dock, a bit strange :

media_1575367207.jpg

(cannot aste the image directly, only the link)

 

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"Yann Guichard and crew will cross the starting line of the Jules Verne Trophy at Ushant between 18:00 on Tuesday and 6:00 on Wednesday,  in front of the Créac'h lighthouse (Ushant) to begin the 21,600 mile route "

They should better keep a very good watch, might find some U.F.O coming in :D

Dec 3rd 8pm Gitana 455 nm to go, speed 30kn , ETA from  23.10 on Tuesday.

Amazing

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They're getting ready to leave the dock

Spindrift.thumb.png.e7d94c6cafae9cfed44a65bcaed77cde.png

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In fact when they broke the mast, they didn't even cross the line right? 

If the case, technically it can indeed be considered as their third attempt. 

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21 minutes ago, yl75 said:

In fact when they broke the mast, they didn't even cross the line right? 

If the case, technically it can indeed be considered as their third attempt. 

They dismasted in front of camaret, quite far from the line indeed. 

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2 hours ago, yl75 said:

In fact when they broke the mast, they didn't even cross the line right? 

If the case, technically it can indeed be considered as their third attempt. 

I would argue that if they had payed the fee for the attempt and there were not refund, it should count as an attempt. Or maybe there is no time limit on the fee, in which case, they are now doing the attempt already payed.

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5 minutes ago, Ahstom said:

They just crossed the line. Good luck to them !

How do you know that ?

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UltimBoat on facebook posted it. They usually have good info. Suprisingly, on spindriftracing website, their attempt has not started yet...

Capture.PNG

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9 minutes ago, Ahstom said:

UltimBoat on facebook posted it. They usually have good info. Suprisingly, on spindriftracing website, their attempt has not started yet...

Capture.PNG

Marine traffic confirms they seem to have started. Is there a delay on the Spindrift tracker?

Capture.thumb.PNG.443df4b48886f5c8826e3d10c579778a.PNG

 

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Indeed :

capture-de28099ecc81cran-2019-12-03-acc8

Note : classified as "high speed craft" and not sailing vessel

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#FLASHINFO: Spindrift 2 a franchi la ligne de départ du #TrophéeJulesVerne ce mardi 03.12.2019 à 20h 55' 54" TU (21h 55' 54" heure française) pour 21,600 milles autour du monde. Objectif : améliorer le record de 40 jours 23 heures 30 minutes et 30 secondes en arrivant le 13.01.2020 avant 20H 27' 25". http://www.spindrift-racing.com/jules-verne/fr/live

safe_image.php?d=AQCSfT7xAmcuCK9_&w=476&
SPINDRIFT-RACING.COM
 
Official site of the around-the-world record attempt for the Jules Verne Trophy Yann Guichard and the Spindrift racing stable with the Spindrift 2 maxi-trimaran.

 

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Looks like they'll reassess again at the Cape. 

Quote

Once into the Southern Hemisphere, the crew will be able to sail more or less directly to South Africa with a view to cross the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope in less than thirteen days. Once at the entrance to the Indian Ocean, the black and gold trimaran, will be able to assess its performance  against the existing record and the potential of completing the 21,600-mile course in record time.

http://www.spindrift-racing.com/jules-verne/en/logbook/99

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I wonder if they are on their "planned" schedule or behind, choosing the starting time must have been quite a headache

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I guess, YES, they are....

Is it an issue for a sailboat to enter those areas, more or less parallel to the traffic? I thought that as a sailboat you were supposed to cross them "as perpendicular as possible" to the flow... Now, knowing that SPindrift 2 is most likely going as fast as, or faster than, all other traffic, that is most likely not a safety problem, but I wonder if this is a regulations violation problem...

image.thumb.png.85cc9882c802e3d2381fbfde67f6d855.png

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25 minutes ago, Laurent said:

I guess, YES, they are....

Is it an issue for a sailboat to enter those areas, more or less parallel to the traffic? I thought that as a sailboat you were supposed to cross them "as perpendicular as possible" to the flow... Now, knowing that SPindrift 2 is most likely going as fast as, or faster than, all other traffic, that is most likely not a safety problem, but I wonder if this is a regulations violation problem...

 

I don't think it is, as long as they maintain their course "within the line", and for most races entering the TSSs is specifically forbidden by the race committees, but clearly not the case for the JV (same for ice limits)

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Looks like thy removed the TSSs from the tracker, to avoid the controversies ? :)

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Where the fuck are they going??? :blink:

Did they just realized that they forgot to take their stock of Port wine, and therefore decided to turn to... port, and make a quick refill in Porto????

image.thumb.png.dc00738b2210b5a60fcb33c1942c0cfd.png

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4 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Where the fuck are they going??? 

And they "slowed" to 19 knots from 28 average in the last 4 hours.  It looks like they either broke something or decided to give up. 

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Traffic stop?

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Their MOD70 has been on the hard since it capsized in 2013, and they have yet to find a buyer. Seems that their larger tri may be joining it being up for sale.

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I wonder how many miles they did since they changed the ama rudders, clearly not enough, but could they have done much more ?

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Either all these high tech ocean racers are sooo fragile or the ocean is toooo full of junk. Or both. :(

 

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Time to put her on the auction block and build a foiler. IMO they've done what they could with her and even if they did take the record, I don't think it would last very long with Gitana and Macif around (and soon BPXI).

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http://www.spindrift-racing.com/news/major-rudder-problem-spindrift-2-forced-abandon

At 20h UTC, Yann Guichard, Spindrift 2’s skipper, made the decision to turn around and end the current Jules Verne Trophy record attempt.
 
A difficult decision following a sudden loss of control, which required the intervention of two sailors at the wheel to recover the situation. This malfunction has damaged the steering system which makes the boat unsafe to be sailed in heavy weather conditions. All the crew members are safe and sound. Nevertheless, the multihull’s condition does not allow it to continue its world record attempt. The trimaran is currently returning to la Trinité-sur-Mer in Brittany, France. More information will be provided as it becomes available.
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1 hour ago, yl75 said:

I wonder how many miles they did since they changed the ama rudders, clearly not enough, but could they have done much more ? 

The boat is ready, so is the crew they said ! No need to train and test the machine.

I think rudder stall is typically something you can detect and solve beforehand !

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1 minute ago, Ahstom said:

The boat is ready, so is the crew they said ! No need to train and test the machine.

I think rudder stall is typically something you can detect and solve beforehand !

Agreed.

Either they hit something, got some damage to the rudders, which triggers the premature stall issue and you are just unlucky...

OR, the rudders are just fine, and you discover after 24 hrs in you round the world run that they have a tendency to stall prematurely, in sailing conditions that are totally acceptable for this beast. And then, it is a severe lack of preparation...

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3 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Either they hit something, got some damage to the rudders, which triggers the premature stall issue and you are just unlucky...

I didn't thought about that possibility, maybe they will communicate on that later...

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Well, the JVT rules say Spindrift can still restart this attempt:

Quote

An attempt of the "Jules Verne Trophy" is considered as committed as soon as the competitor crosses the starting line of the course between the 1st of August of the current year and the 31st of July of the following year.

During this period, hereinafter referred to as the "attempt year", the competitor will be allowed to return to the starting line as many times as he wishes without having to re-pay the entry fee.

http://www.tropheejulesverne.org/reglement/ 

So, Pit Stop? The rudder/ steering systems still needs fixing anyway unless Guichard decides to totally write her off.

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24 minutes ago, stief said:

The rudder/ steering stems still needs fixing unless Guichard decides to totally write her off.

Given their stand-by ends on December the 15th because after that, they prefer to train on the tf35 on the Léman lake, I doubt they will go again this year. 

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Just now, Ahstom said:

Given their stand-by ends on December the 15th because after that, they prefer to train on the tf35 on the Léman lake, I doubt they will go again this year. 

Yeah, I doubt they'll go too, but if he wanted to try for the Atlantic record, the Spindrift systems need the fix anyway. 

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1 hour ago, Ahstom said:

The boat is ready, so is the crew they said ! No need to train and test the machine.

I think rudder stall is typically something you can detect and solve beforehand !

Sure (at least for detecting),  they didn't push hard enough, but I forgot when they got the boat back in the water after they abandoned their last year tentative around Australia (they started in January  so in fact this year), and redid the rudder Shafts (maybe the complete rudders) at Persico.

In the end clearly not enough commitment on this project, but they didn't have that much time either probably (also due to the issue with the new rudders during their stand by).

In any case too bad, nothing to follow now ! :(

 

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They got the boat back in the water on Sept 16 :

Quote

Spindrift 2 was put back in the water on Monday 16th September in the presence of Dona Bertarelli, Yann Guichard and the Spindrift racing team.

The world’s largest racing maxi trimaran has spent the past few months being further optimised, as well as being fitted with new load bearing rudder plates, following the structural failure of the starboard rudder plate during the Jules Verne Trophy record attempt last winter. The whole team was onsite at the Multiplast boatyard in Vannes this morning to help with the launch operation; this required careful attention down to the smallest detail, as the 40m trimaran was gently lifted into the water.The operation was overseen by team co-founder Yann Guichard and Spindrift 2’s boat captain, Erwan Le Roux, who had also ensured that each stage of the refit went smoothly. “We carried out a complete structural study of the T-rudders and worked on the aerodynamics, saved some weight and also did a complete check-up of the boat’s structure,” explained Erwan Le Roux.

Once its 38m tall mast is fitted, the trimaran will sail to its home port of La Trinité-sur-Mer.  There, the technical team will finish configuring the maxi trimaran for record mode, before the Jules Verne Trophy squad begins a series of ‘inshore' and 'offshore' training sessions during September.

The Jules Verne Trophy remains the team’s goal, with the two-month stand-by period starting on the 1st October.

The challenge is to beat the record time of 40 days 23 hours 30 minutes and 30 seconds set by Francis Joyon on Idec in 2017. Alongside the new racing season and the team’s future challenges, Yann Guichard and Dona Bertarelli are also delighted to announce changes to the management team at Spindrift racing. Léo Lucet, who, as Executive Director, has been one of the pillars of Spindrift racing since its creation in 2011, has taken over the management of all of Dona Bertarelli and Yann Guichard’s private affairs in Switzerland, of which Spindrift racing is a part. 

"This represents a new challenge for him and is a development of the role he has had alongside us while managing Spindrift racing.  Léo will remain in his capacity as Executive Director until the end of the Jules Verne Trophy attempt,” explains Dona Bertarelli.

Lucet will be succeeded as Executive Director of the Spindrift racing by Jean-Sebastien Chénier Proteau, who will be joining the team at its Saint-Philibert base in mid-October. A key player in the industry for several years, the 36-year-old Canadian has worked on major international projects such as the America’s Cup with Groupama Team France, the victorious Dongfeng Race Team in the Volvo Ocean Race, as well as Oman Sail and SailGP. Chénier Proteau, who has a Master’s in Business and Administration, will be in charge of organising the administrative, technical and sports teams.

"We warmly welcome Jean Sebastien and are delighted that he is joining the team. He will continue Léo’s work and use his broad international and managerial experience to continue developing our sports programme, both for the Jules Verne Trophy attempt this autumn, and also for the arrival of the TF35 in 2020,” concludes Yann Guichard.

http://www.spindrift-racing.com/news/launch-spindrift-2-and-new-appointment

(some very "corporate" talk there ...)

So indeed not that much time, but could it have been quicker ? Most probably ...

Previous news is on the M32 program :

http://www.spindrift-racing.com/news/m32-world-championship-starts-lake-garda

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Sad.  

Quote

SPINDRIFT 2 STOPS ITS ATTEMPT ON THE JULES VERNE TROPHY: YANN GUICHARD EXPLAINS 

December 5, 2019

  

At about 19:00 (French time) on Thursday, December 4, Spindrift 2 lost control of its steering.  The windward rudder was unable to operate correctly once the boat speed went beyond 35-40 knots, resulting in the black and gold trimaran being unable to stay on course.  These issues are in line with problems detected a few weeks ago, which had resulted in erratic performance of the appendages.

“We seem to have had rudder issues for a year now.  We broke one in the Indian Ocean last February and, as a result,  decided to build two new ones. We had delivery of them in late September, and have carried out several sea trials with them. We thought we had sorted the issue when we left La Trinité-sur-Mer on Tuesday, however these rudders are like a 'sword of Damocles’.  The favourable weather conditions around the start at Ushant, gave us the opportunity to check their reliability one last time, before heading into the Southern Ocean,” report Yann Guichard on the phone from Spindrift 2 this afternoon. 

"We tried a number of  times to solve the problem, but it keeps reappearing at high speeds and we can not control Spindrift 2, even with two crew on the helm. It is not prudent to continue like this, because there is a risk of total loss of the trimaran at high speed, which in turn is a not only a risk to the crew but the steering system could become severely compromised.  Though we have managed to regain control of the boat now, we cannot race around the world with this technical problem ... "

The reality is that if Spindrift 2 cannot sail with confidence above 35 knots of speed, there is little chance of improving on the existing reference time for the Jules Verne Trophy, which stands at 40d 23h 30 '30’.

Spindrift 2 had already hooked into the Portuguese trade winds and was in manageable seas with about 25 knots of wind further underlining that, even in benign the conditions, the situation would not improve, however much the crew intervened.

"We are now heading back towards La Trinité-sur-Mer in a moderate easterly wind, but will go through a ridge of depression tonight.  We will wait for the winds to abate before entering the channel and we should be back on the pontoon on Friday evening. Given the problems we have to solve, at the moment, I do not think it is realistic to leave this year for an attempt on the Jules Verne Trophy. This is a massive disappointment for the whole team because we had found a good weather window to leave." Concluded the skipper of Spindrift 2.

Fundamental design flaw?

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48 minutes ago, stief said:

Sad.  

Fundamental design flaw?

Yes looks like it, maybe also due to the T foils ? But obviously others know how to make them work. ... Or a too thin cord ?

As BP V it didn't have T foils (at least at the beginning) :

14176.jpg

Also quite strange that it is the windward rudder causing the issue 

 

Edit : windward is a translation mistake , in the French version it says leeward

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17 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Also quite strange that it is the windward rudder causing the issue 

Went back to the French article : le safran sous le vent.  That leeward yes?

So translation glitch ?

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16 hours ago, yl75 said:

 

In the end clearly not enough commitment on this project, but they didn't have that much time either probably (also due to the issue with the new rudders during their stand by).

 

 

I also sense a lack of commitment in this project.  Seems like they spent X millions on the boat and updates. Success didn't come easily. Now just trying to make something out of it but not really all that keen anymore.

When BP did their all their records with this boat they had the old taller, heavier mast and associated larger sails, no T rudders and probably more other weight that has subsequently been removed.

On the record BP RTW run they at one point looked on for a possible 40, even sub 40, day finish but, as I recall, the North Atlantic didn't play ball and they had to make a pretty full circuit to get to the finish.  Even at the finish I recall that they ran down the line toward France before crossing, because BP is of course French, and they had the record easily.

All those modifications Spindrift made which have not delivered when maybe all that was really needed was just to keep trying and hopefully find a extra bit of good weather.

So I'm guessing 'for sale' ads next but I wonder who, if anyone, will ever buy it now.  Sad, it is a great boat but now very quickly becoming out dated and of course not 32/23 class compliant.  Hopefully Gitana will try for the record next year.

Photo of how I like to remember that boat, taken when they sailed past me in NY Harbor in 09 while on standby for their still standing Atlantic and 24 hour record runs.  Wish I had a better camera back then.

41dvKa8K3l51x6mMXT3X50g-sAIDEJfP_k_SY-Hb3OcCsvk0OwfvRYSdhBNdr9LVbHhqqpI4wXin6y3Q21p3aldBtVKwxrk3K915duq-zg3KIrF1YzcXgE3fyBp01FIfU1IcONkq6cVtKK4ruQUi3eCZuD2TA7NWTFi6OanWEucEpTR-9rKHDXwbR4HhONRGoHNa04p17-z2OUbzCpm4Rni925HUvNj1hTo7InGghR57d4IXeU4n7vR7WHMtGgF7rkLqzuTOJkqoY__kqpxcvvSxLr4YFyOaoX-LK2VaUrL17tWru5T5UfxmxL8p7t30FhpE-BET5mjuQaxNiosj4DqYUvplpeUh8BEbFpNU8EwskbixsCjxwJKp_MB1xvPozHk_KOQurvMBCTJduOe-MtZNTEQ2RXvInaCyYZErHwWAcsoxzgXCm7dsMKMj9suybmzWe4oI3U7CTq0X8cUuPoU42mRoeZxapkgjEEGBtoP-WaGxjGPm7DPUyblipOFXfgNdPCLq5126cGHeMvuvuWjuJu8VzkwTmiVKZUMymjyEWVpNVFXBHDwk7kCCJD1lDYuV4XLSZk2qncaAuPjr1dSH4geVYhgefFGYesFm6fGu3MHNb8tMABDYzX21fm_ke-d5q7tYTII6aRgK7rgcbnU8zAmWLT7ZOzgc0ZKHAuWWCi-u3gEkBQ=w1188-h891-no

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They're lucky to own the boat without any sponsor, some would have slam the door / fire some people for a long time !

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3 minutes ago, jb5 said:

So I'm guessing 'for sale' ads next but I wonder who, if anyone, will ever buy it now.  Sad, it is a great boat but now very quickly becoming out dated and of course not 32/23 class compliant.  Hopefully Gitana will try for the record next year. 

Luckily for them, 32/23 class RTW race during 2020/2021 winter could start from mediterranean coast (said the speaker at the arrival of Gitana) so they should have an other "peacefull" try next year.

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59 minutes ago, Laser1 said:

Went back to the French article : le safran sous le vent.  That leeward yes?

So translation glitch ?

Yes indeed.

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30 minutes ago, Ahstom said:

Luckily for them, 32/23 class RTW race during 2020/2021 winter could start from mediterranean coast (said the speaker at the arrival of Gitana) so they should have an other "peacefull" try next year.

Isn't that 32/23 RTW race winter 21/22? BP and Macif launching early 21 around the time when the VG finishes I thought. 

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16 minutes ago, jb5 said:

Isn't that 32/23 RTW race winter 21/22? BP and Macif launching early 21 around the time when the VG finishes I thought.  

True (cf: press conference from april 2019), not enough fact checking. Winter 2020 is dedicated to RTW record, solo or crewed.

programme-ultimes.jpg

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Posted this morning

 

 

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