Bugsy

3,000 mile rowing race

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These guys (and girls) are all in. 

https://www.taliskerwhiskyatlanticchallenge.com/2019-race-tracking/

From the website:

The premier event in ocean rowing – A challenge that will take you more than 3000 Miles west from San Sebastian in La Gomera, Canary Islands, Spain (28oN 18oW) to Nelson’s Dockyard, English Harbour, Antigua & Barbuda (17oN 61oW). The annual race begins in early December, with up to 30 teams participating from around the world. The race structure brings together an environment where teams from across the globe gather in the race village San Sebastian in La Gomera, Canary Islands. The atmosphere is electric as people help each other prepare for the challenge of the mighty Atlantic Ocean. All with the same objective – to take on the unique experience of crossing an ocean in a rowing boat.

 

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7 hours ago, bugger said:

These guys (and girls) are all in. 

https://www.taliskerwhiskyatlanticchallenge.com/2019-race-tracking/

From the website:

The premier event in ocean rowing – A challenge that will take you more than 3000 Miles west from San Sebastian in La Gomera, Canary Islands, Spain (28oN 18oW) to Nelson’s Dockyard, English Harbour, Antigua & Barbuda (17oN 61oW). The annual race begins in early December, with up to 30 teams participating from around the world. The race structure brings together an environment where teams from across the globe gather in the race village San Sebastian in La Gomera, Canary Islands. The atmosphere is electric as people help each other prepare for the challenge of the mighty Atlantic Ocean. All with the same objective – to take on the unique experience of crossing an ocean in a rowing boat.

 

Sounds like a Monty Python bit.

 

"I can row across the ocean farster than you!"

 

"No you can't"

 "Yes I can!"

 "Don't be silly! No one can row across the ocean farster than I can!"

"I'll prove it! 1,000 Quid up front!"

 "OK.... And I'll give you a day's head start....Tata!"

 

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Jeezuss - I was in my last year of high school when John Fairfax rowed across - the first person to do it.

Now it's a fuckin' race? :wacko:

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3 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Jeezuss - I was in my last year of high school when John Fairfax rowed across - the first person to do it.

Now it's a fuckin' race? :wacko:

Next they'll be doing something really stupid, like trying to get sailboats to do it.

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While it is an amazing achievement to traverse an ocean in a vessel that can be rowed, its a stretch to say that anyone has rowed across an ocean... drifted with oars would be more accurate, no?

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11 minutes ago, Weyalan said:

While it is an amazing achievement to traverse an ocean in a vessel that can be rowed, its a stretch to say that anyone has rowed across an ocean... drifted with oars would be more accurate, no?

Oh boy.

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Don't get me wrong, having read a couple of books about such transoceanic "rows" I am amazed by the tenacity and courage of the people that undertake such voyages, but still... 

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12 minutes ago, Weyalan said:

While it is an amazing achievement to traverse an ocean in a vessel that can be rowed, its a stretch to say that anyone has rowed across an ocean... drifted with oars would be more accurate, no?

Say that to John Ridgeway and Chay Blyth - to their faces.

Go on - I dare you.

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I knew this was opening a can of worms, and I probably should have kept my big trap shut (story of my life), I just recall finishing reading one of the abovementioned novels about rowing across an ocean (I can't even recall which one) and thinking that for significant portions of the crossings the vagaries of current and wind seemed to be having more effect on their progress than their (heroic) efforts with the oars

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9 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Say that to John Ridgeway and Chay Blyth - to their faces.

Go on - I dare you.

Lia ditton

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10 hours ago, Weyalan said:

While it is an amazing achievement to traverse an ocean in a vessel that can be rowed, its a stretch to say that anyone has rowed across an ocean... drifted with oars would be more accurate, no?

I read Rowing Across The Atlantic by Roz Savage and what you said has a lot of truth to it.  Any kind of heavy headwind resulted in negative miles.  Often times, the author could gain more distance not rowing than rowing.  All you need is the wind and currents in your favor.

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We were anchored at the Dockyard quite a few years ago and there was an announcement on the VHF that the first boat in this race was approaching. It was a singlehanded, a Brit naturally, and he landed to quite a bit of applause. Someone handed him a beer and he casually carried on a conversation as if he had been out for a day trip. He looked somewhere between very fit and emaciated. The next boat was doublehander and he beat it by four days or something.

The boats are quite impressive looking. A couple have been abandoned there, I assume because they are shot to hell and obsolete for the next race. I can see the appeal and I am not even English, but too old to consider it now.

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13 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

Sounds like a Monty Python bit.

 

"I can row across the ocean farster than you!"

 

"No you can't"

 "Yes I can!"

 "Don't be silly! No one can row across the ocean farster than I can!"

"I'll prove it! 1,000 Quid up front!"

 "OK.... And I'll give you a day's head start....Tata!"

 

"Spam!"

Related image

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3 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

 I can see the appeal and I am not even English

You can?

I can see the appeal of most insanely stupid human activities - free climbing, polar treks etc. but I fail to see that one - sailing across an ocean is plenty for an endurance challenge IMO - even that is a lot more than I ever wanted to do.

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8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

You can?

I can see the appeal of most insanely stupid human activities - free climbing, polar treks etc. but I fail to see that one - sailing across an ocean is plenty for an endurance challenge IMO - even that is a lot more than I ever wanted to do.

Having sailed across for oceans I don't view such an endeavour as much of an endurance challenge. Mostly just a very pleasant experience with the odd 'interesting' event. I am sort of inclined to endurance things rather than short, exciting things like rock climbing and the like. I am at least 30 years past my best before date for doing something like rowing the Atlantic but I could see myself doing it.

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2 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Having sailed across for oceans I don't view such an endeavour as much of an endurance challenge. Mostly just a very pleasant experience with the odd 'interesting' event. I am sort of inclined to endurance things rather than short, exciting things like rock climbing and the like. I am at least 30 years past my best before date for doing something like rowing the Atlantic but I could see myself doing it.

Yes, I didn't think crossing from Hawaii to BC was much of an endurance thing. It was mostly very relaxed, with moments.

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ex-Gurkha brother-in-law did this a few years ago on a double-hander.

Brutal, as you'd imagine.

full 360 rolls in big swells, locked down in the tiny cabin - not fun!

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Bump.

While everyone else was having Christmas, New Year's and getting back to work, these guys and girls are *still* out rowing. 

The first boat is expected to finish today.  

My hat is off to all competitors in this race.  

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On 12/12/2019 at 10:23 PM, SloopJonB said:
On 12/12/2019 at 10:05 PM, Weyalan said:

While it is an amazing achievement to traverse an ocean in a vessel that can be rowed, its a stretch to say that anyone has rowed across an ocean... drifted with oars would be more accurate, no?

Say that to John Ridgeway and Chay Blyth - to their faces.

Go on - I dare you.

I dunno, they're getting pretty old for fisticuffs... still, it wouldn't be very nice

How about saying it to one of the several women who have done it?

Also, isn't this thread kosher for Sailing Anarchy??

- DSK

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3 hours ago, bugger said:

Bump.

While everyone else was having Christmas, New Year's and getting back to work, these guys and girls are *still* out rowing. 

The first boat is expected to finish today.  

My hat is off to all competitors in this race.  

That's a pretty spread out fleet.  1st place at 12 NM DTF and last place at 1713 NM DTF:blink:

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On 12/12/2019 at 9:23 PM, SloopJonB said:

Say that to John Ridgeway and Chay Blyth - to their faces.

Go on - I dare you.

I'd be more intimidated by Lia Dutton than those old guys...

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I'd be doing steroids for the first half. Wouldn't be in the system by the time you arrive.

Seriously hard core.

What are the limits on boats having a very big fwd superstructure that just happens to catch the wind better? Oh its mostly to provided inverted buoyancy...

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One of the wife's colleagues from the hospital is in it with her mother and one other girl, 3 up, so she's following this a bit.

Lots of seasickness due to the constant rolling of the boat, no doubt a few personal/physical issues and sea-anchors deployed to stem the loss when the wind is not cooperating.

Everybody has their own 'Everest' but you have to ask why somebody chooses to go through all that hardship.

 

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16 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:
On 12/12/2019 at 10:23 PM, SloopJonB said:

Say that to John Ridgeway and Chay Blyth - to their faces.

Go on - I dare you.

I'd be more intimidated by Lia Dutton than those old guys...

It would be a poor choice of pick-up lines if you were hitting on her

- DSK

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On 1/14/2020 at 12:51 AM, Zonker said:

I'd be doing steroids for the first half. Wouldn't be in the system by the time you arrive.

Seriously hard core.

What are the limits on boats having a very big fwd superstructure that just happens to catch the wind better? Oh its mostly to provided inverted buoyancy...

The boats seem to be versions of this. The company lists fully equipped ones for about 50 000 pounds which seems pretty high since there is no engine, rigging etc.

image.png.6802c416ac2d577480fca49095de5675.png

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On 12/13/2019 at 7:11 AM, Jules said:

I read Rowing Across The Atlantic by Roz Savage and what you said has a lot of truth to it.  Any kind of heavy headwind resulted in negative miles.  Often times, the author could gain more distance not rowing than rowing.  All you need is the wind and currents in your favor.

What a gorgeous, incredibly awesome rower she is. We spoke once a long time ago, eventually she was like (and I'm paraphrasing since she's British and said it much more delicately); "enough of the flattery, just try to speak to me the way you would speak to a male rower."

Uh, yeah, kind of hard, Roz ...

6026030.jpg

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On 1/13/2020 at 10:51 PM, Zonker said:

What are the limits on boats having a very big fwd superstructure that just happens to catch the wind better?

It's likely the same argument to why a lot of sea kayak rowers won't feather their paddles ... downwind, they get the benefit of exposed paddle, in a cross-wind they don't have the stability problems from catching the wind on the exposed face, and yes, the  feathered paddles do have an advantage in the headwind. But that's about 1/4 of the time advantage, versus 3/4 of the time advantage for the unfeathered paddles.

Ocean rowing is so much more difficult than regular flat-water rowing because a hull that long sets up its own linear wave system, with the induced bow wake, and the stern trough and the both the hull and the induced wave system need to harmonize with the ocean wave system to keep the rower's strokes from canceling themselves out somewhat.

On a regular flatwater scull, you really don't need to be terribly intelligent to win races. You need to have a power output like a tick of a clock, and the ability cross the finish line a tenth of a second away from cardiac arrest. But ocean rowing requires nearly constant recalculation of stroke length, power output stroke shape, these rowers probably don't even notice making those adjustments eventually. There is no other way to do it though, lest those powerful strokes end up slowing down the boat more than propelling the boat.

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Not ocean rowing, but flat water rowing, anyone seen this new thing, the Hydrow? It's apparently the Peloton of rowing ... like a Concept II with a tv screen and an internet connection shoved into it.

You supposedly get on this thing and row against others, or as a team. I guess that part might be a little fun, but who rows indoors like that?

Properly done, indoor rowing isn't something where you usually want to listen to someone in the internets give you encouragement and critiques. There are no unexpected hills and valleys in rowing, it's flat. Properly done, indoor rowing is you getting on a regular old Concept II, and then briefly turning your body into a motor. All of your human complexity, communication and imagination, collapses into you trying to be the most perfectly paced, strongest motor you can cajole your cardiopulmonary system into being without killing the host organism that they call "Dave" or "Julie" or "Eddie" or whomever is in the seat.

Rick Yukon himself taught me to row, literally one day before he infamously crashed that bread truck into his own loading dock. I didn't realize it at the time, but he had already been awake for three days at that point, four days when he finally passed out and crashed that truck. He didn't mention anything to me about the "sound in his head" when he was rowing, probably because he had taken off those fucking boots and could no longer hear that 18,000 Hertz practical joke.

And then he crashed the bread truck into that loading dock, out of his mind from lack of sleep and unfiltered Gitanes, and suddenly the practical joke wasn't so funny anymore, huh fuckers?

Nobody ever fessed up to putting that piezo thing in his boot that kept him awake, but it was definitely someone who sailed with him, and might someday read this post. That was a funny joke, but it wasn't funny after Day One. You should have told him what you did so he could have taken it out of his boot and not drifted into emotional collapse for lack of sleep with hearing that sporadic beep. Slippery motherfucker even used gloves when he or she stuck it in there so Ricky couldn't dust for prints when he finally found it in his boot while recovering in the hospital. Yeah, fucking hilarious. He had no health insurance. Not so funny now, huh fucker? He was saving that money to give to his daughter for the down-payment on a house, not the hospital and the ambulance.

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