JoelGreatLakes

Shorthanded Offshore Trailerable Boat Suggestions: See Criteria

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Alright folks, I wanted to start a thread to see if anyone has recommendations for boats for the following criteria. 

What I will do with it. 

- Single and double-handed mid and long-distance offshore( 30 miles to 200 miles). I will mostly do great lakes races but want to do a distance ocean race every other year with Transpac being my solo bucket list race. 

- Fun boat to buoy bash in with 3 to 5 crew. We want to do Chicago Noods, and travel to Charleston Race(example) week or others but I have no desire to juggle a crew of 6 or more. 

What I wont do with it.

-This is not a boat to go cruising in for even a weekend. We will enjoy it for some fun day sails, but mainly it's a racing machine for myself offshore, my wife on the buoy races. Luxuries are not a necessity here. Luxuries are nice but I care more about sailing fast. 

Criteria(Always happy to hear someone fight back on this)

- $20k to $50k purchase used. 

- 27ft to 33ft (preferably 30ft)

- PHRF of 120 or less(faster is generally always better)

- Lifting keel: I want a boat I can trailer launch. No desire to play the game of deliveries from long races. Get it on the trailer at the nearest boat launch and drive it home. No finding cranes or lifts either. Keep it as simple as possible. 

- Beam under 10ft: Want to keep trailering as simple as possible. Storing this at my house in the offseason and planning to drive this to a lot of the races or drive it home. 

Preferences

- Asymmetrical kite. 

- Prefer standing headroom(5' 11") at the companionway but I know this is likely going to be something I won't get. 

- Shorter mast with flat top main. 

- No running backstays

- Open stern for clear drainage and easier access back into the boat from the water

- Have a one design class exist somewhere to go race against every year or so. 

No Opinion(happy to have you give me one)

- Inboard or Outboard... I have had both on boats and I can tell you why I do and don't like each. 

 

So far boats that have come up in my search and discussions are as follows. I have gotten opinions for owners and non-owners on most but I'll list them, some saying to avoid for various reasons but I wanted to list them anyway.  Henderson 30, Columbia 32 or 30, Flying Tiger 10, Tripp 33, C&C SR33, Elliot 770, First 27.7, Tripp 26. 

New designs that are exciting to me but unaffordable are: L30, Bente 28, and First 27. 

If you have opinions on any of the boats I am happy to hear them! 

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Antrim 27

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39 minutes ago, solosailor said:

None of those even come close to having standing headroom.

Hense me saying its an item in the preference column. Haven't found one yet that that meets that item. L30 is the closest but that is in the far to expensive category....

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Andrews 28.  Good luck finding one though.

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45 minutes ago, Roleur said:

Andrews 28.  Good luck finding one though.

Thats the problem with most of them on the list... Andrews 28 looks like a nice interior compared to most of the others on the list. The Tripp 26 is one I am very interested in but have only seen one ad up all year. Maybe my googling skills need improving. I did an 8 day 200mile cruise in college on Lake Superior in a Catalina 25 I owned with 2 other guys. Was one of the best trips I have ever done. Hit some storms and big seas and never felt uneasy about that size of boat. But it sailed terribly.... haha

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4 hours ago, Varan said:

J90 if you can find one, otherwise H33, Express 27, Moore 24.

H33 and Express 27 will work. Cant believe I missed the H33 in my researching. Seems like a fun sled that checks almost every box. Moore 24 is crazy to me that so many do the Pac in that thing.... Wild! I need a bit more boat.

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I'd scratch the SR33 from your list.  It is a fun boat to sail, but it is NOT one to sail short handed (single handed spin gybes with runners at night is a handful...trust me!) and it is not trailerable without pulling permits (and probably a pilot car) for every jurisdiction you go through.  An SR27 may be an option, but there are only a handful of them around and you still get to deal with runners.

Ross 930 ticks some of your boxes.  As mentioned above, Hobie 33 ticks more of your boxes.

 

 

1524355348003.jpg

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53 minutes ago, Que said:

I'd scratch the SR33 from your list.  It is a fun boat to sail, but it is NOT one to sail short handed (single handed spin gybes with runners at night is a handful...trust me!) and it is not trailerable without pulling permits (and probably a pilot car) for every jurisdiction you go through.  An SR27 may be an option, but there are only a handful of them around and you still get to deal with runners.

Ross 930 ticks some of your boxes.  As mentioned above, Hobie 33 ticks more of your boxes.

 

 

1524355348003.jpg

Good call, replacing the SR 33 for the SR 27 on my list. The beam is a deal breaker for sure! The SR 27 looks like a great fit for the most part. Know of any hiding around looking for a new owner?

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with the exception of being NOOD capable (since there isn't an active class), find a Columbia 30 or 30-2. It's easily set up for shorthanded sailing, lifting keel, weighs in around 5500 lbs so doesn't require a beast to tow, deck stepped mast that can be lowered without a crane, reasonably well built, decent head room down below, and pretty fast. Generally rates 69 - 75 in PHRF depending on region, doesn't get too spanked under ORR-ez. I've enjoyed mine since 2014 and I'm still learning a lot about it.

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1 hour ago, ryley said:

with the exception of being NOOD capable (since there isn't an active class), find a Columbia 30 or 30-2. It's easily set up for shorthanded sailing, lifting keel, weighs in around 5500 lbs so doesn't require a beast to tow, deck stepped mast that can be lowered without a crane, reasonably well built, decent head room down below, and pretty fast. Generally rates 69 - 75 in PHRF depending on region, doesn't get too spanked under ORR-ez. I've enjoyed mine since 2014 and I'm still learning a lot about it.

Any good recommendations on where to find them @ryley? They look like a really comfortable boat and with that PHRF, fast. 

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7 minutes ago, SuddenlyBrown said:

@SuddenlyBrown where did you find that?... I am supposed to be in LA in about 3 weeks.... Maybe Ill drive?

 By the way, UP, where at? I am from Marquette, went to tech, and worked in Iron Mountain for a while and still own apartments in town there. 

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The boat is on YachtWorld as well.
 

I’m located in Escanaba. Maybe you can keep your future boat down here. Would fit right in with my Antrim ha.

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@ryley I just read through that actually. Apparently their keel was wabbling on his solo Bermuda race and he abandoned it. The boat floated around for 23 days and then they were able to go and get the thing and get her home. The pin for the keel was badly bent. They talk highly of the boat other than that small detail. I didn't see any info on whether they followed through on the mods they had in mind to strengthen the keel for offshore work again. I reached out though and hope to hear back. They seem like a fun couple in all their adventures. Pretty nice to be able to have a trailerable racer and a J120 to go back to for cruising and larger crewed offshore events. 

 

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4 hours ago, SuddenlyBrown said:

Nice find!  This would seem to tick a lot of buyers boxes and good looking boat to boot (doubt Schumacher ever penned anything but good looking).  Looks very similar to Synergy 1000 with added bonus of lifting keel, hardly surprising since both designed by him. 

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@SuddenlyBrown @ryley Just spoke with the broker and going to take a look at the boat while I am out in LA for a conference in a few weeks. Looking forward to checking this out in person. Supposedly this owner has done some additional improvements to the boat to make it more seaworthy including beefing up the keel trunk and the bow including some flotation. 

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Transpac requires outboards to be in a well if equipped. So the h33 fits that requirements as does a melgas 32. Or a shock 40 

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That is correct re: Transpac.   I think he was referring to the Singlehanded Transpacific Yacht Race?   If so, a motor is not even required for that race.

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I would say the boat to fit the bill ... than the 33 ft criteria is the Fast 40.   I know that Lawndart/Narrow Escape has already done a number of Transpacs.  Easy to trailer.   8.5 beam.  Lifting keel.   If it hasn't been done - turf the pole and the symmetrical and put a tackline on the bow which is 4 feet ahead of the forestay.  No pole required or sprit required for the asymmetrical.  You can keep the pole in the case that you might want to run extremely deep; but, not required.   FAST 40 photo 

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25 minutes ago, dilligaf said:

I would say the boat to fit the bill ... than the 33 ft criteria is the Fast 40.   I know that Lawndart/Narrow Escape has already done a number of Transpacs.  Easy to trailer.   8.5 beam.  Lifting keel.   If it hasn't been done - turf the pole and the symmetrical and put a tackline on the bow which is 4 feet ahead of the forestay.  No pole required or sprit required for the asymmetrical.  You can keep the pole in the case that you might want to run extremely deep; but, not required.   FAST 40 photo 

Interesting thought. I am looking to stick to the length requirement. Bigger boat, bigger loads, more canvas, more expenses. Interesting that it could fit into the mix though. The more it costs to upkeep a boat the less I can afford to get out and use it. I would rather sail more than work more! 

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13 hours ago, Matagi said:

You mean this?

29570602_187457768539253_770785778018055

@Matagi Yeah that's now in the Beneteau line as the First 27. Haven't found any affordable seascape 27 boats for sale in the US used. Most are overseas, unfortunately. Seems like a cool concept and many of these get out for ocean racing in Europe. 

 

Generally, it seems like the European designers come up with more concepts that fit the bill in today's era.  

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17 hours ago, solosailor said:

That is correct re: Transpac.   I think he was referring to the Singlehanded Transpacific Yacht Race?   If so, a motor is not even required for that race.

You are correct in calling me out on the Transpac. As someone who hasn't made it out for West Coast racing all races to Hawaii are the Transpac in my mind. Looking forward to the Solo Transpacific Yacht Race and the Pacific Cup DH. 

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41 minutes ago, JoelGreatLakes said:

You are correct in calling me out on the Transpac. As someone who hasn't made it out for West Coast racing all races to Hawaii are the Transpac in my mind. Looking forward to the Solo Transpacific Yacht Race and the Pacific Cup DH. 

When you say you want a trailerable boat does that mean something you can (relatively) easily tow or are you looking to be able to ramp launch the boat too? 

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@ctutmark Looking to ramp launch. Great to have the option of crane launch(single point lift) as well but not necessary. Will likely pull in and out 8 to 10 times a year so I won't tolerate paying for a lift and dealing with logistics of that mess. 

Great example being the Chicago to Mac. I dont want to deliver home 3 days. I want to do the race and my wife will meet me at the finish with my daughter towing the trailer. We will have fun at the party together, enjoy the island, stay a night in a hotel together, toss the boat on the trailer and then drive home. Travel time home being 8hrs to pack up the boat and get home vs 3 days. 

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This Elliot 770 looks like a great looking boat and a nice sail inventory. 

https://sailinganarchy.com/advert/elliott-770-9/

Minor(major) concern being the photo and reports of keel bulbs falling off.... Not really interested in playing roulette every time I go out on the big water! Read the thread and take a look at the photos if you havent seent it. Sent an email to the Elliot group assuming the email listed in the form is still active. 

 

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Refer to 5.1, Most of the boats recommended seem to have an opening into the boat interior even if they can be locked down.

Maybe someone else can interpret better.


C9E3A597-4356-402E-80A3-132E648979A4.thumb.png.472c406645e6e36ef3fb668e184e64fe.png

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1 hour ago, JoelGreatLakes said:

This Elliot 770 looks like a great looking boat and a nice sail inventory. 

https://sailinganarchy.com/advert/elliott-770-9/

Minor(major) concern being the photo and reports of keel bulbs falling off.... Not really interested in playing roulette every time I go out on the big water! Read the thread and take a look at the photos if you havent seent it. Sent an email to the Elliot group assuming the email listed in the form is still active. 

 

Can we please stop the talk about bulbs falling off Elliott 770s? I only know of one bulb and one keel that broke where it came out of the bottom of the boat. The bulb loss was because of how the owner maintained the boat, the broken keel had to do with unauthorized mods done to the stub of the keel that weakened it. I sailed mine offshore quite a lot, including once in the Greenport Ocean Race. There was keel work that needed to be done that had to do with how it was built in the first place, but it was not a huge deal. The bulb is encapsulated in the two halves of the keel, so when people over-sand (by fairing) the joint between the shaft and the bulb, it *can* weaken that joint. 

There were about 14 of the boats built in the state with the last hull number being 15 (no hull 13 I believe). I had 11. I think something like the first 6 were built in Florida and the last 8 were (over)built by Holby Marine in Rhode Island. They are all good boats, each with strengths and weaknesses, but my personal choice would be to buy (again) one of the Holby boats. Hull 15 was modified to have masthead kites (and I think running backstays), and I think most of us had finally gotten good squaretop main designs as well.

Elliott 770s are fun boats. They have a few minor design flaws as far as I'm concerned - for one thing I don't like the fractional chute, but there are some good shapes for them so it's not a terrible shortcoming. I didn't like the rudder design, so Jim Taylor designed a new, fixed rudder for the boat. This only slightly complicates ramp launches, but if your outboard rotates, then it's not a problem getting to deep enough water to put the rudder on.

It takes 2 people about an hour to rig or derig an Elliott. If you go this way, I can send you details about how to not have a heart attack every time you try to raise or lower the mast. One very cool thing is that since the mast hinges backward and has swept spreaders, you only need to detach the head stay (which is also the only variable rig tension adjustment on the boat) and the shrouds can stay attached. I used to lower my rig in our slip and drive the boat over to charlestown under a bridge to haul it out. 

I had mine for 6 years, won a lot of races with it, and really enjoyed the boat. rates around the same as a J/70, planes in about 13 knots, is "campable" but not what I'd call a family cruiser, but for a 25' boat it has decent room down below (except the keel trunk necessarily bifurcates the cabin). If you're looking at that boat then also look for a Bull 7000, but these are definitely heading in a different direction from your original RFP ;)

BTW, they are decent shorthanded boats. we raced ours short-handed when BIRW still had a division, and we were either 3rd or 4th on the week. No autopilot, just a lot of steering with the tiller between my knees so I could help with other lines.

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@ryley Thanks for the input. Searching around in other forums I am catching some other comments you have regarding your experience. Very helpful! And hopefully you get that if someone is looking at a boat and they see the first few images on Google with a flipped over boat and half a keel bulb your going to raise a red flag and go searching for answers for due diligence. 

You think the Holby models need any particular mods or beefing up?

If you had to choose between the Schumacher 28 and the Elliot 770 which would you likely go with and why? Do your best to make your choice based on what I am looking to do with the boat. Assume both could be had for $20k. See two options currently on the market. 

https://sailinganarchy.com/advert/elliott-770-9/

https://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1997-schumacher-schumacher-28-7142433/

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I saw those pictures too and we had a conversation about it when it happened. tragic, yes, but also completely avoidable.

The only thing I would change on the holby model is that there is a plywood bulkhead underneath the cockpit that can show signs of rot. I'd either glass it or replace it entirely with one of glass or G10. On mine, I also reinforced the forward bulkhead where the headstay adjuster attaches, and I put a piece of G10 on the cabin top on the side where the winch raises the keel, since it does cause the cabin top to flex. I replaced the two cabin top winches (one was single speed, the other was two-speed non-tailing) with 2 speed tailing lewmars. And as I said I replaced the lifting rudder and its under-engineered stainless tiller and box assembly with a carbon rudder with a higher aspect ratio and a carbon tiller.

As to which I would buy... that would really depend on what my requirements were. the Schumacher is really intriguing to me, and it is roomier down below. as you know, roleur was able to outfit his to do the TP and the Bermuda 1-2. I don't think I'd attempt anything that audacious in an Elliott. The 85 mile Greenport Ocean Race was challenge enough for the E. So if you're aspiring to do more ocean races, then between the two, I'd take the Schumacher. That said I don't know how to get it on a trailer.

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Like this:

7142433_0_090720191425_3.jpg?t=156267543

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Sorry Roleur, I meant more about how to lower the mast, etc. Clearly can be done, but I figured with your experience, you're a better person to ask ;)

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On 12/29/2019 at 3:29 PM, JoelGreatLakes said:

 

Of all the boats on your list that you are considering, Fling Tiger 10M by far satisfies all of your realistic requirements including  5'-11" standing height at the companionway.

 

 

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@marcus brutus It seems like they are great boats. Have seen a few while at regattas but non in my local fleets I race with so I havent gotten a chance to get in one yet and see what they feel like getting on the boat. I havent heard/seen these as being raced shorthanded very often. A few owners have even suggested not to try. Obviously everyone has their opinions so you have to make your own opinion. Curious to hear your thoughts on shorthanded sailing offshore with the boat.

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13 hours ago, JoelGreatLakes said:

@marcus brutus It seems like they are great boats. Have seen a few while at regattas but non in my local fleets I race with so I havent gotten a chance to get in one yet and see what they feel like getting on the boat. I havent heard/seen these as being raced shorthanded very often. A few owners have even suggested not to try. Obviously everyone has their opinions so you have to make your own opinion. Curious to hear your thoughts on shorthanded sailing offshore with the boat.

Go back and look at that video. He's close reaching single-handed in less than 10 knots. I know he says it gusted to 18 but not in the first minute of that video. What I see is a boat whose form stability is dependent on putting people on the rail. I haven't raced on one but I've raced against them, and because they're built to be delivered in a container, they are very slab-sided. They're very stable when they are sailed flat, and they lose their stability quickly. Fun boats no doubt, fast boats for sure, but I think you can find a better boat for shorthanded offshore sailing.

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5 hours ago, ryley said:

Go back and look at that video. He's close reaching single-handed in less than 10 knots. I know he says it gusted to 18 but not in the first minute of that video. What I see is a boat whose form stability is dependent on putting people on the rail. I haven't raced on one but I've raced against them, and because they're built to be delivered in a container, they are very slab-sided. They're very stable when they are sailed flat, and they lose their stability quickly. Fun boats no doubt, fast boats for sure, but I think you can find a better boat for shorthanded offshore sailing.

I hate to disagree with a fellow sport boat enthusiast, but throughout the entire  66 second on the water sequence, from 0:00 to 0:41 and from 1:47 to 2:12, there are whitecaps on the water.

 

 

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On 1/2/2020 at 6:57 PM, JoelGreatLakes said:

@ryley Thanks for the input. Searching around in other forums I am catching some other comments you have regarding your experience. Very helpful! And hopefully you get that if someone is looking at a boat and they see the first few images on Google with a flipped over boat and half a keel bulb your going to raise a red flag and go searching for answers for due diligence. 

You think the Holby models need any particular mods or beefing up?

If you had to choose between the Schumacher 28 and the Elliot 770 which would you likely go with and why? Do your best to make your choice based on what I am looking to do with the boat. Assume both could be had for $20k. See two options currently on the market. 

https://sailinganarchy.com/advert/elliott-770-9/

https://www.boats.com/sailing-boats/1997-schumacher-schumacher-28-7142433/

The 28 cannot be had for $20k, but would likely go for 23-25k - I flew to SD a couple months back to check it out.

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11 hours ago, marcus brutus said:

I hate to disagree with a fellow sport boat enthusiast, but throughout the entire  66 second on the water sequence, from 0:00 to 0:41 and from 1:47 to 2:12, there are whitecaps on the water.

Scattered whitecaps.. barely.. on the Beaufort scale that's a 3, or around 7-10 knots. I see a couple of cats paws come through that are probably higher gusts. But even if you're right, then let's move it to a 4 and make it 11-16. It doesn't really matter; my point about the RM on an FT10 is still relevant.

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17 hours ago, ryley said:

Scattered whitecaps.. barely.. on the Beaufort scale that's a 3, or around 7-10 knots. I see a couple of cats paws come through that are probably higher gusts. But even if you're right, then let's move it to a 4 and make it 11-16. It doesn't really matter; my point about the RM on an FT10 is still relevant.

From your comments about FT10 it appears that you have never sailed on one.

If so, may I respectfully suggest that you go sailing on a FT10 ASAP and then post your on water impressions; life is too short to miss good experiences because of uninformed opinions.

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As I said before, I've raced against them several times. I went over them with a fine tooth comb when they were new, at the St. Pete NOODs. Since I was around for the whole WLYDO design process, I've loved the concept since it came out. I've watched the debates over the rudder designs, was there for the fights over fairing the bomb bay doors,  and watched them slip out of OD configuration and into the realm of fast, fun, sport boats competing in a variety of ways. So I don't actually need to sail one to know how much fun they are - they're a blast downwind, they need to be held down going upwind, and the build quality is decent. In 2008 there was a whole thread about the suitability of the FT10 for shorthanded sailing and the general consensus by people like solosailor, cazza randa, and clewless - FT10 owners and also shorthanded sailors - was that the FT10 was *probably* ok for shorthanded sailing in up to around 15 knots and then it got to be a handful, even reefed, and even with full sails it suffered upwind against other boats because of its form stability and its waterline length. Even the class president said the boat was a handful in 18 knots with a full crew. Bob Perry wouldn't endorse the boat for a fully crewed transpac, so if races like that are on the OP's agenda (they are), then maybe the FT10 isn't the boat for him. If my opinion, shaped by owners and the boat's designer is uninformed, so be it.

But I can't disagree that life is too short to miss good experiences. That's why I and 7 of my closest friends (including my Dad) were out on Boston Harbor racing on NYD, why I'm doing at least 4 of the 5 shorthanded events in Mass Bay in my Columbia, and spending a couple of weeks cruising Maine with my wife on the Freedom this year. 

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On 1/6/2020 at 1:48 PM, ryley said:

...  a boat whose form stability is dependent on putting people on the rail. 

The solution to keeping control whether there are 2 or 12 crew is to judicially depower the rig, and the FT10 was designed to do that well.

In addition, it would be easy to mount a removable inner stay for a solent and a fractional spinnaker halyard just above the hounds much like on Seascape 27.

With reduced weight of just 2 crew, the FT10 would get on a plane quicker.

 

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2 hours ago, marcus brutus said:

The solution to keeping control whether there are 2 or 12 crew is to judicially depower the rig, and the FT10 was designed to do that well.

In addition, it would be easy to mount a removable inner stay for a solent and a fractional spinnaker halyard just above the hounds much like on Seascape 27.

With reduced weight of just 2 crew, the FT10 would get on a plane quicker.

 

So, have you sailed the FT10 single-handed? Because, you know, uninformed opinions don't count and so on and so forth, especially not on the internet ;)

Judicially depowering a rig to keep control works until it doesn't. The question is, what happens after that?

I think Bob Perry is one of the best at turning a briefing into a drawing. Soloing (or even double-handed sailing) the FT10 was certainly not part of the briefing. You can even solo a Farr 280, but from the account of the skipper / survivor: it was part successful, part scary, but certainly not fun.

ulrichrungstednielsen_006-e1569502585263

 

 

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Leftcoast dart if you can find one.  Also Elliott 770 , seascape 27/24 would be ultimate but still very expensive 

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56 minutes ago, 44forty said:

Everyone knows that those can grow to 30 feet easily, if you splash some magic potion on them. So no problem matching the brief.

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2 hours ago, Matagi said:

So, have you sailed the FT10 single-handed? Because, you know, uninformed opinions don't count and so on and so forth, especially not on the internet ;)

Judicially depowering a rig to keep control works until it doesn't. The question is, what happens after that?

I sailed FT10s, but only since 2007.

The answer to your second paragraph is that I do not know since I never had the boat in >40kts conditions, but reefing the main and changing to a storm jib works wonders in the big breeze.

In one race where all the Farr 40 ODs that rounded the top mark shreded their chutes we had spreaders in the water, but once we turned the corner the front 50% of the hull was out of the water and a J/125  crew that had taken their chute down gave us a standing ovation as we planed by.

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On 1/7/2020 at 3:39 AM, M26 said:

mini :P

@M26 is that what you've got on the FB profile? Ive followed a lot of the class over the years and really love what they are doing. Wish there were more of them in the states. 

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On 1/7/2020 at 1:39 AM, M26 said:

mini :P

For offshore racing, absolutely! For the other part of his brief;

"...but mainly it's a racing machine for myself offshore, my wife on the buoy races ."

Mini's, like gentlemen, don't really like to go to windward (very well...).

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No-one has mentioned an Olson 30. Headroom an issue but lots of other upsides. Very good boat for two and people singlehand them all the time, SHTP etc. Capable offshore. Old design but very hard to beat in terms of price to performance ratio. Can be had for way under your top $. No A-kite standard but people add sprits. No flat top main. Might not meet stability rules for the Chicago-Mac. 

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11 hours ago, JoelGreatLakes said:

@M26 is that what you've got on the FB profile? Ive followed a lot of the class over the years and really love what they are doing. Wish there were more of them in the states. 

we just recently bought a mini. the one on the fb profile is a 26ft buoy racer that we raced here and there doublehanded, but it was a boat that required people on the rail to sail to it's potential. 

Yeah I guess a mini is a pain in the ass on short buoy courses. But at the end of the day for me are the long downwind runs that counts and make me sleep good at night :D

 

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Just bought a Henderson 30 from Seattle in September. Our new Hendo will be on Lake Michigan for 2020, dry sailed. Looking forward to some killer downwind rides on the high rollers! 

Planning on the Queens Cup, The Hook, 100 miler, Red Fox Regatta and a few others...

New 3di’s are on the way. 

Can’t wait!! 

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Sadly, no boat exists that will fit all of your criteria especially the under $50k part.

Don't expect one design either. For your budget, get yourself a reasonably priced older 30 footer with the SA/Displ ratio that will be kind to a light crew.

Even then you may need some water ballast in order to be competitive , so include that in your budget.

You should also include non-overlapping head sails in your criteria since that's a must for any shorthanded sailing.

You can upgrade almost any decent platform to your requirements if you've got the skills and no how.

 

 

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Soloing (or even double-handed sailing) the FT10 was certainly not part of the briefing. You can even solo a Farr 280, but from the account of the skipper / survivor: it was part successful, part scary, but certainly not fun.

I singlehand a boat similar to those all the time....   yes challenging, can be scary, but certainly gratifying.  

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You could turbo an Int 210, like this turboed Int 110, might be in your price range too 
 

linky- 

- good thread

here is the turboed 110 & the thread on it

image.jpeg.04011a80f839b0d1f668be44188f48fa.jpeg

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Admiralty 30 (ex-JS9000) is a great singlehanded but doesn't meet most ocean race rules.   Has no interior, squeeze-in kneeling room.   

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On 1/15/2020 at 5:01 PM, Hendo30 said:

Just bought a Henderson 30 from Seattle in September. Our new Hendo will be on Lake Michigan for 2020, dry sailed. Looking forward to some killer downwind rides on the high rollers! 

Planning on the Queens Cup, The Hook, 100 miler, Red Fox Regatta and a few others...

New 3di’s are on the way. 

Can’t wait!! 

awesome boat, another one hard to shorthand sail especially due to the runners. There's a good hendo 30 thread over in sportboat anarchy you should definitely check out if you haven't already.

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3 hours ago, ryley said:

awesome boat, another one hard to shorthand sail especially due to the runners. There's a good hendo 30 thread over in sportboat anarchy you should definitely check out if you haven't already.

Having 2 sets of runners myself, you do get used to it, but there are moments where planning ahead just isn’t in the cards.  (Like when tight runners and the boom get intimate, or the batten ends get caught in a loop of a loose leeward runner :lol: - trim the batten ends so they stick out as little as possible! ) Make sure you coil your tails religiously, and if you haven’t already, go to blocks with cam cleats instead of winches.  Quickness is more important than power, most of the time.  I have some fancy French (?) HUGE blocks that are da bomb, and if you’re interested, I can take a pic.  It’s rope floor for sure, but I’ve done it now for 20 years on a 40er, and the mast is still up, but there are times when it is really tiring. On the other hand, when they’re right, it’s really cool, but you have to look ahead a lot.  Like an hour.  I do dream about an unstayed rig more that I should admit.

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Feel like idiot, I singlehand the boat all against these criteria except PHRF 96.

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On 1/2/2020 at 11:01 AM, dilligaf said:

I would say the boat to fit the bill ... than the 33 ft criteria is the Fast 40.   I know that Lawndart/Narrow Escape has already done a number of Transpacs.  Easy to trailer.   8.5 beam.  Lifting keel.   If it hasn't been done - turf the pole and the symmetrical and put a tackline on the bow which is 4 feet ahead of the forestay.  No pole required or sprit required for the asymmetrical.  You can keep the pole in the case that you might want to run extremely deep; but, not required.   FAST 40 photo 

We have pretty much the same setup on Amati- never feel like we need a prod or a pole. (We use a snuffer, but a deck sock with a scoop would be nicer, at least that’s what I think, but not gotten around to it.)   We’ve never had more than a bit of spray over the bow, though. On the other hand, our U 20 needed a prod.....

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Nice Elliott 770 for sale in the Classifieds. Not mine, but used to be - I put her together and successfully raced a lot.

Cheers, Greg

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