Sign in to follow this  
scribe

water from air

Recommended Posts

FWIW ..As well as the Genny system featured on the SA home page there is the US Source solar powered water generator which is generating world wide interest.. there's 300 units in Australia.. helping out in regional and remote communities whose local water had dried up .. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-23/murrurundi-water-hydropanels-solar-technology/10836638

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Better get @mikewof in here stat.

 

AAAAARRRRRRGGGGGHHHH.....Now you've done it, Ed!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Water from air"?   Using the sun?

Sounds like some solar panels coupled with a dehumidifier.

There have been a few questionable efforts to make "Water from air".  Thunderf00t on Youtube likes to bust them:

Warning:  Thunderf00t tends to ramble.  A lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moisture farming is so hot right now.

moisture farming.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't this some pitch on Dragons Den or some show that was looking for investors?  They got pretty much laughed off stage if I recall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Better get @mikewof in here stat.

If you want stat, you got to say it 3 times. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, scribe said:

FWIW ..As well as the Genny system featured on the SA home page there is the US Source solar powered water generator which is generating world wide interest.. there's 300 units in Australia.. helping out in regional and remote communities whose local water had dried up .. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-23/murrurundi-water-hydropanels-solar-technology/10836638

 

Doubters gonna doubt, and haters gonna hate, but from your link, this is legit..

A critically dry town's 'magical, otherworldly' solution to sustainable clean drinking water

By Donal Sheil

Posted 22 Feb 2019, 2:30pm

<snip>.....

With the 10-panel system capable of producing 3,000 bottles of water per month, hydropanels use solar power to produce large-scale condensation.

Water is then mineralised and placed in an ozonator, where it can be channelled to a nearby tap.

Zero Mass Water Asia Pacific Vice President James Symons said despite the technology's farfetched elevator pitch, it could soon become pedestrian in drought-affected communities.

"A lot of innovations seem too good to be true when they set out and then they become commonplace, and that's the definition of technological disruption," he said.

"We're here to complement traditional infrastructure and say to these communities even when times are at their worst in times of drought, at least you can always have fresh drinking water."

After gaining clearance from the NSW Department of Education, Zero Mass Water was authorised to install NSW's first school-based hydropanels.

Mr Symons said schools were the perfect place to position panels within towns.

"Whenever you have problems with drought and water shortages we always think about our most vulnerable community members," he said.

"That's obviously children in many cases."

As off-grid, modular systems that scale as needed, Mr Symonds said the potential for hydropanels was still yet to be seen.

"Our vision is to make these units deliverable at a community-scale," he said.

Community rallies to keep hope flowing

Murrurundi's local swimming pool has become a beacon of hope in the town.

Entering a sweltering 2018 summer without it was almost a reality, though.

Unable to pay the freight for water, the Upper Hunter council was assisted by local pub, The Royal Hotel.

After hosting various fundraising events raising $1,700 in donations, the driver, truck and fuel were paid for.

By the first week of December, the Murrurundi War Memorial Swimming Pool was open, requiring 990,000 litres of water to clean and fill.

"You can imagine the joy that they get from swimming, that's what they look forward to," local school principal Ms Hopkins said.

"It would've had a very negative impact on the mental health of not just the adults in the family, but particularly the children."

'They're doing as much as they can'

Sophie Luscombe and Rachel Brown are Murrurundi Public School's co-school captains.

After practising her backstroke under the pool's blue canopy, Ms Brown said long-term water restrictions had taken both a visual and emotional toll on the town.

"We can't have vegetables, we can't have gardens because we can't water them," she said.

Grateful for the generosity her town had enjoyed, Ms Luscombe said she was excited to have sustainable clean drinking water.

"The town is really asking for more help, but we're getting as much as we can," she said.

"The technology is great because it is helping our town out and we're getting yummy water, and clean water."

Are hydropanels the sustainable solution?

Professor Michael Roderick, a researcher at the Australian National University's School of Earth Sciences, said hydropanels could potentially provide a creative counter to the greenhouse effect.

Dr Roderick said CO2 created by land clearing, cars and industrial works warms the atmosphere, which in-turn allows it to hold more water.

"Water by itself is a very strong greenhouse gas, so it multiplies the CO2 effect," he said.

Grateful for the generosity her town had enjoyed, Ms Luscombe said she was excited to have sustainable clean drinking water.

"The town is really asking for more help, but we're getting as much as we can," she said.

"The technology is great because it is helping our town out and we're getting yummy water, and clean water."

Are hydropanels the sustainable solution?

Professor Michael Roderick, a researcher at the Australian National University's School of Earth Sciences, said hydropanels could potentially provide a creative counter to the greenhouse effect.

Dr Roderick said CO2 created by land clearing, cars and industrial works warms the atmosphere, which in-turn allows it to hold more water.

"Water by itself is a very strong greenhouse gas, so it multiplies the CO2 effect," he said."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not like water is a rare commodity on earth. Is this cheaper than trucking it in?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Energetically, it's one of the most expensive ways to make water that exists. But in the magical world of finance, sure, why not.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cmilliken said:

Energetically, it's one of the most expensive ways to make water that exists. 

How do you believe it operates?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cmilliken said:

Energetically, it's one of the most expensive ways to make water that exists. But in the magical world of finance, sure, why not.   

 

With solar energy?  If you have no other more cost effective source, then it's a no-brainer.  The alternative, is to move to somewhere else....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

12 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

How do you believe it operates?

CM nailed it. It's just a dehumidifier. Ten-to-one that little water fountain in the picture is probably the only output from that thing. It might make a few gallons per day when the air is especially dry, or maybe less than a cubic meter if they have a giant PV field next to it.

There isn't anything revolutionary about it, it's been around inadvertently since the early 1900s when Willis Carrier invented the air conditioner. But like someone said once a really long time ago "... but in the magical world of finance, sure, why not?"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Technically it does dehumidify, but I'm not sure if any type of  refrigerant is a part of the process...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

Technically it does dehumidify, but I'm not sure if any type of  refrigerant is a part of the process...

Yes, it'll probably use a refrigerant and some sort of simple compression/expansion heat pump although it could use ammonia/water absorption chilling.  No need for butane or the more exotic versions.  The size of an absorption chiller to handle that much airflow would be pretty ridiculous so i REALLY doubt that's in the plan although it would be 'cool' because no moving parts :) Pun intended!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, cmilliken said:

...probably...

So you're unsure, yes?

Me too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

So you're unsure, yes?

Me too.

There's only so many options.   Could be a $100 compression/expansion heat pump.  Could be a $500+ thermoelectric cooler.  Could be a $1000+ dollar absorption cooler.  Could be a $5000 geothermal system.  So yes, probably :)

Now you have me curious - why does the presence or absence of refrigerant matter? 

There are some desiccant based systems that can also absorb moisture and then boil it off but those are generally even less efficient than the dehumidifier versions.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, mikewof said:

Man, screw that water-from-air machine, this is way, way better ...

 

Very cool video :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, cmilliken said:

Now you have me curious - why does the presence or absence of refrigerant matter? 

Someone upthread mentioned Willis Carrier. 

 I couldn't find any technical information regarding its function, so I couldn't commit to saying "Oh, that's what it is".

IOW, I wasn't cocksure. ;)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Consider for a moment the logistics of this, where a majority of those whom don't have access to water don't have the necessary humidity level for it to work properly. Yes perhaps in India where energy is cheap (fossil fuel argument aside) and the humidity is high however Africa and other impoverished areas don't have the environment for it to work. Heck making a device to drill water wells would be a better investment of ones time/resources. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A by product of such an arrangement is the ability to chill your beer .  But why waste so much energy and resources making an uninhabitable place habitable? Civilizations that migrated to water supplies have flourished, others, not so much. WHY challenge Darwin?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, warbird said:

But why waste so much energy and resources making an uninhabitable place habitable? Civilizations that migrated to water supplies have flourished, others, not so much. WHY challenge Darwin?

Because people aren't permitted to migrate anymore. Or maybe your plan is to have some of them migrate to your area so that you can share your abundance of water. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, inneedofadvice said:

Because people aren't permitted to migrate anymore. Or maybe your plan is to have some of them migrate to your area so that you can share your abundance of water. 

Migrate to the first body of water.  Oh shit,  Canadians coming!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, warbird said:

Migrate to the first body of water.  Oh shit,  Canadians coming!

They are here... they live amongst us as ordinary citizens.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Windward said:

They are here... they live amongst us as ordinary citizens.  

 

Sleepers? I will know we are trully fucked when I see Labatts at every MiniMart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, warbird said:

Sleepers? I will know we are trully fucked when I see Labatts at every MiniMart.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this