mikewof

What happened to all the dump trucks?

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I did look for this answer on the interwebs, couldn't find an answer. So I did try. Failed. But y'all never disappoint. So here are the questions ...

Over the last twenty-some years, I've noticed more of of those side-dumper trucks, and the live-bottom trucks. And then, without really realizing it, I almost never see any more standard dump trucks. Just today, I noticed a standard dump-on-frame truck, and it looked like it fell out of Central Casting, first standard dump truck I have seen in well over a month, with lots of lots of trailer dump trucks.

1. What are the economics of these new side and bottom trailer dump trucks that they have appeared to have taken over the industry? Does it have something to do with the versatility of the rig? Is it a road tax issue? The new ones seem to carry about the same amount of gravel to my eye, they are very long, but the box has that bottom taper.

2. Are there any major job site advantages of the live bottom and side dump trailers? Was there any major issue with the good 'ol fashioned box-on-frame dump trucks?

3. Were did all the standard dump trucks go? Somewhere else in the USA? Mexico? South America? Back in the day, I would see fifty a day or more. Do they disassemble them and turn them into something else?

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I was in Loving County, Texas, yesterday, around Mentone and Orla. All of the dumptrucks in the entire world, of all kinds, are there for a world dirt moving convention. 

The bottom dumpers have a much lower center of gravity, especially laden, are safer on the highway, have built in covers to keep sand and gravel from breaking your windshield, and when building plant pads or drilling locations, can far more accurately position the loads as needed. All of the major dirt contractors have moved to them. The conventional dumptrucks are usually older and are now owned by mom and pop contractors, usually Hispanic owned and giving those families a step into the entrepreneurial class. 

At least that's the report from the oil patch. 

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Sheeeeit. Ya mus be some kinda city feller.

We got plenty here in the sticks where we all spek Mercan.

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Still mostly old fashioned dump trucks in New England as far as I can see?  Rarely see the ones you describe?  At the large manufacturing plant here, where I work, they have a couple of very large Euclid type site dumps for massive snow removal after a storm. The area where they dump the snow must dead earth being so loaded with salt after the snow melts....

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Bottom dumps are good at delivering to a drive over hopper. Think remote redimix plant. Sand on one hopper,  stone in another hopper and cement in a silo.  Similar for asphalt.

A dump box wears out and needs relining. The truck  is out  of commission. A tractor hooks up to a different trailer.  Maybe a lowboy or flatbed for a different job.

A straight truck  is limited to 72 or 74000 lbs gross. A semi to 80000 because of the greater axle span. IIRC. Building light a straight truck can haul ~25tons IIRC , A light tractor trailer combo ups it to 26 or 27.

Independents often contract "tons delivered "

 

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Most local jobs use the tandem 10-12 yd ones - the trailers (18 wheelers) can carry twice as much except - if loaded to the front they are very unstable when unloading, doesn't take much to topple so you wind up with 16-18 yards (at most) and they take much longer to dump so only useful for longer hauls. Typically the rounded bottom ones are used for rock/gravel - bottoms are much stronger.  As CL noted the standard ones are owned/operated by individuals - pretty expensive to upgrade that type of equipment. In these parts the dirt/clay is often wet thus sticky and the older ones easier to dump.  Onsite it's now common to have tractors with multiple pans doing the pickup and dumping using lasers to get it to grade.  All my experience is in the gulf coast area, I know that dry/sandy/rocky areas differ as even tracks are narrower on equipment. In these parts not getting stuck is important.

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They must have all moved here.

I've never seen the side & bottom dumpers you describe around here.

The big innovation in dumpers around here was putting those roller blinds over the bed to keep the contents from blowing away.:D

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Apparently there all being used to build roads and housing In South Carolina because the quantity is mind boggling 

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As an aside, Is it nationwide or just so cal that concrete cutting companies keep all their trucks in full pimp condition?  

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1 hour ago, Owen said:

As an aside, Is it nationwide or just so cal that concrete cutting companies keep all their trucks in full pimp condition?  

Many local outfits are pretty fastidious. I remember guys from one company waiting to get loaded would pull out rattail hand brooms and sweep out the cab. I had Ford Tractor blue and white paint scheme on my trucks with black frames. Touch up with a stock color from fleet farm in a rattle can to keep the trucks presentable from 30 feet. Spare tires in the shop were mounted on rims with a fresh coat of white. One  day Fritz finished doing 8 rims that came back from the tire shop. I wondered in and complimented his work. He replied, "just call me Rimbrandt". Law enforcement is less likely to pull over a truck that looks well cared for. When you NEED $60/hr (or whatever it is in your area) billable on your truck, a 20-60 minute stop by LE fucks up your day even when weights, brakes, tires, safety equip, lights, license,  permits, are current.

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I live in Cali for Nigh yay (along with Jed Clampett).  They sent those trucks away decades ago because they were fixin the infrastructure the government decided wasn’t needing fixin. 

Enjoy the  cheap low mileage trucks.

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2 hours ago, Owen said:

As an aside, Is it nationwide or just so cal that concrete cutting companies keep all their trucks in full pimp condition?  

Around here dump trucks age like cars - the cosmetics just fade over time. They do seem to generally be cleaner than in days of yore - maybe there's a jumbo car wash somewhere.

The pimpin' trucks here are the dairy haulers - polished S/S everything. Gorgeous things. Concrete haulers are usually well kept too.

Here's a question for those who know truckin' - what happens when a guy hauling a load of concrete gets stuck in one of those impossible traffic jams - like hours in a tunnel or something with no way out?

What happens to the load? How long can they keep it soft by adding water?

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6 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I was in Loving County, Texas, yesterday, around Mentone and Orla. All of the dumptrucks in the entire world, of all kinds, are there for a world dirt moving convention. 

The bottom dumpers have a much lower center of gravity, especially laden, are safer on the highway, have built in covers to keep sand and gravel from breaking your windshield, and when building plant pads or drilling locations, can far more accurately position the loads as needed. All of the major dirt contractors have moved to them. The conventional dumptrucks are usually older and are now owned by mom and pop contractors, usually Hispanic owned and giving those families a step into the entrepreneurial class. 

At least that's the report from the oil patch. 

Orla?  Get a beater boat for red bluff lake...great place to camp and sail.

Last time I sailed there it was daylight at midnight due to all the gas flares around the lake.  Kinda hard to sleep though!  I'll be in Van Horn next week and may stop by up there

KB

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43 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Around here dump trucks age like cars - the cosmetics just fade over time. They do seem to generally be cleaner than in days of yore - maybe there's a jumbo car wash somewhere.

The pimpin' trucks here are the dairy haulers - polished S/S everything. Gorgeous things. Concrete haulers are usually well kept too.

Here's a question for those who know truckin' - what happens when a guy hauling a load of concrete gets stuck in one of those impossible traffic jams - like hours in a tunnel or something with no way out?

What happens to the load? How long can they keep it soft by adding water?

ASTM calls for 90 minutes from mix to discharge max. Can be waived with a passing “slump test”.  For any commercial job, a slump test followed by a core sample and testing after initial cure is required. Adding water is a trick that compromises the strength and the core sample will fail, requiring the defective material to be removed and replaced.   Some  operators will push the time and adding water isn’t unknown but can lead to a structurally deficient pour.  I watched two aircraft ramps get jackhammered up and replaced in the last 18 months because of underspec concrete. 

Quality GC’s will check the mix time of any load, even on a residential job because big claims after a failure start with a core sample and testing. Liability gets established pretty quickly if the concrete isn’t as specified in the order. 

I’m not a concrete geek but have been my own GC for a few jobs and my son interned for a civil engineering firm while he was in college.  He took the samples and conducted the tests for commercial buildings, runways and the like.  

 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Around here dump trucks age like cars - the cosmetics just fade over time. They do seem to generally be cleaner than in days of yore - maybe there's a jumbo car wash somewhere.

The pimpin' trucks here are the dairy haulers - polished S/S everything. Gorgeous things. Concrete haulers are usually well kept too.

Here's a question for those who know truckin' - what happens when a guy hauling a load of concrete gets stuck in one of those impossible traffic jams - like hours in a tunnel or something with no way out?

What happens to the load? How long can they keep it soft by adding water?

 

50 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

ASTM calls for 90 minutes from mix to discharge max. Can be waived with a passing “slump test”.  For any commercial job, a slump test followed by a core sample and testing after initial cure is required. Adding water is a trick that compromises the strength and the core sample will fail, requiring the defective material to be removed and replaced.   Some  operators will push the time and adding water isn’t unknown but can lead to a structurally deficient pour.  I watched two aircraft ramps get jackhammered up and replaced in the last 18 months because of underspec concrete. 

Quality GC’s will check the mix time of any load, even on a residential job because big claims after a failure start with a core sample and testing. Liability gets established pretty quickly if the concrete isn’t as specified in the order. 

I’m not a concrete geek but have been my own GC for a few jobs and my son interned for a civil engineering firm while he was in college.  He took the samples and conducted the tests for commercial buildings, runways and the like.  

 

The drums pile up on the back 40. Most concrete places I have been to have a drum or two filled with cured concrete setting off in the corner. 

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1 hour ago, warbird said:

The drums pile up on the back 40. Most concrete places I have been to have a drum or two filled with cured concrete setting off in the corner. 

Is it better to let them cure completely before the chipping company comes out to clean them out? Why not spray out what they can with water and lower the chipping costs to reclaim the drum?

Do they ever not reclaim the drums? If so, what does someone do with a several tons of concrete dried into a giant fucking steel drum? Sell it as a mooring?

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2 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

ASTM calls for 90 minutes from mix to discharge max. Can be waived with a passing “slump test”.  For any commercial job, a slump test followed by a core sample and testing after initial cure is required. Adding water is a trick that compromises the strength and the core sample will fail, requiring the defective material to be removed and replaced.   Some  operators will push the time and adding water isn’t unknown but can lead to a structurally deficient pour.  I watched two aircraft ramps get jackhammered up and replaced in the last 18 months because of underspec concrete. 

Quality GC’s will check the mix time of any load, even on a residential job because big claims after a failure start with a core sample and testing. Liability gets established pretty quickly if the concrete isn’t as specified in the order. 

I’m not a concrete geek but have been my own GC for a few jobs and my son interned for a civil engineering firm while he was in college.  He took the samples and conducted the tests for commercial buildings, runways and the like.  

 

I was thinking more about just getting the stuff out of the drum before it hardened, not delivering it.

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The plants are usually close to the jobs and dispatchers monitor this as ambient temperature affects how long before it fails- in worst case drivers are supposed to spin out the load and the company will send equipment to clean and haul it off. I was on a job when the driver got lost (on the job site), was supposed to be a kicker with 3 yds, turns out he had 6 to 7 and managed to turn it over driving off road. Owner came out and fired him on the spot. Pretty sure he was going to hit me until I explained  I was just trying to find the guy.  Something I learned that day is sugar will retard the curing but doesn't work when the truck is no longer vertical.  Supposedly a 2 liter bottle of coke will do it.  Can't verify if that actually works. 

Concrete hardens with age so the new stuff that is not poured on site is made into crushed concrete for driveways etc - for fun try sawing some 50+ year old concrete, I think it hardens forever.  A friend was attempting to cut across a driveway poured in the early 50's and managed to burn up a couple of saws before I got there. Big saw, good blade, lots of water and patience. Come to think of it wood is similar, fun driving nails in really old wood.

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3 hours ago, Crump's Brother said:

Orla?  Get a beater boat for red bluff lake...great place to camp and sail.

Last time I sailed there it was daylight at midnight due to all the gas flares around the lake.  Kinda hard to sleep though!  I'll be in Van Horn next week and may stop by up there

KB

I windsurfed there in the 1980's. We had a beater boat, a Boston Whaler, gave it away for a donation to a favored charity. Easier to fly to Maine and sail the cruiser.

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999533536_Dumptruck.jpg.83826c0cb6e3a2aacaa2ffbad627cfb4.jpg

I have often wondered where this Dump Truck ended up. Green Marine build Dubois 54 from early in the IMS era. Sailed on her the first season. Never figured out whether she was a dog or we didn't know what we were doing. Probably the latter.

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Probably the name cursed the boat.

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8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Around here dump trucks age like cars - the cosmetics just fade over time. They do seem to generally be cleaner than in days of yore - maybe there's a jumbo car wash somewhere.

The pimpin' trucks here are the dairy haulers - polished S/S everything. Gorgeous things. Concrete haulers are usually well kept too.

Here's a question for those who know truckin' - what happens when a guy hauling a load of concrete gets stuck in one of those impossible traffic jams - like hours in a tunnel or something with no way out?

What happens to the load? How long can they keep it soft by adding water?

Nobody can pimp a truck like the Japanese.

 

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14 hours ago, Blue Crab said:

Sheeeeit. Ya mus be some kinda city feller.

We got plenty here in the sticks where we all spek Mercan.

Agreed.  However, in our area the old style dump-trucks are pretty much gone in favor of gravel-hauler style dumpers where any big rig can hall the dump-trailer. More versatile that way.

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7 hours ago, warbird said:

 

The drums pile up on the back 40. Most concrete places I have been to have a drum or two filled with cured concrete setting off in the corner. 

 

6 hours ago, mikewof said:

Is it better to let them cure completely before the chipping company comes out to clean them out? Why not spray out what they can with water and lower the chipping costs to reclaim the drum?

Do they ever not reclaim the drums? If so, what does someone do with a several tons of concrete dried into a giant fucking steel drum? Sell it as a mooring?

 

5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I was thinking more about just getting the stuff out of the drum before it hardened, not delivering it.

I think the cured on the drum relics are driver error, traffic jam or total power loss.   We had an accident in town last year where a redimix truck ended up on it's side. On coming car crossed center lane and hit a car ahead of the ready mix truck, truck swerved and tipped. At least the two injured victims didnt get smushed by a 70000 pound truck. 

A driver doesn't always have a place to off load 6 yards of concrete when the water tank goes empty.

All sorts of scenarios occur to piss off the boss. 

Chipping out a drum might be a nonstarter.  OSHA work place rules: confined space,  particulate, noise exposure,  air circulation......

I never worked in the industry except to supply material.

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Just now, warbird said:

 

 

I think the cured on the drum relics are driver error, traffic jam or total power loss.   We had an accident in town last year where a redimix truck ended up on it's side. On coming car crossed center lane and hit a car ahead of the ready mix truck, truck swerved and tipped. At least the two injured victims didnt get smushed by a 70000 pound truck. 

A driver doesn't always have a place to off load 6 yards of concrete when the water tank goes empty.

All sorts of scenarios occur to piss off the boss. 

Chipping out a drum might be a nonstarter.  OSHA work place rules: confined space,  particulate, noise exposure,  air circulation......

I never worked in the industry except to supply material.

My brother was the CFO for a big concrete company in New Jersey for quite a few years.  He said if a driver returned with a cured load that was his fault, it was the poor driver's job to chip it out.  My brother said they rarely made the same mistake again.

That was some years ago, I don't know if things have changed due to the reasons you mentioned.

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5 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

My brother was the CFO for a big concrete company in New Jersey for quite a few years.  He said if a driver returned with a cured load that was his fault, it was the poor driver's job to chip it out.  My brother said they rarely made the same mistake again.

That was some years ago, I don't know if things have changed due to the reasons you mentioned.

I have had redimix delivered for home and club projects. The drivers have always done anything and everything to get the pour going and keep it going:lol:

I cannot imagine the job of chipping out a drum.

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12 minutes ago, warbird said:

I have had redimix delivered for home and club projects. The drivers have always done anything and everything to get the pour going and keep it going:lol:

I cannot imagine the job of chipping out a drum.

I've heard it isn't fun.

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27 minutes ago, warbird said:

I have had redimix delivered for home and club projects. The drivers have always done anything and everything to get the pour going and keep it going:lol:

I cannot imagine the job of chipping out a drum.

 

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6 hours ago, d'ranger said:

The plants are usually close to the jobs and dispatchers monitor this as ambient temperature affects how long before it fails- in worst case drivers are supposed to spin out the load and the company will send equipment to clean and haul it off. I was on a job when the driver got lost (on the job site), was supposed to be a kicker with 3 yds, turns out he had 6 to 7 and managed to turn it over driving off road. Owner came out and fired him on the spot. Pretty sure he was going to hit me until I explained  I was just trying to find the guy.  Something I learned that day is sugar will retard the curing but doesn't work when the truck is no longer vertical.  Supposedly a 2 liter bottle of coke will do it.  Can't verify if that actually works. 

Concrete hardens with age so the new stuff that is not poured on site is made into crushed concrete for driveways etc - for fun try sawing some 50+ year old concrete, I think it hardens forever.  A friend was attempting to cut across a driveway poured in the early 50's and managed to burn up a couple of saws before I got there. Big saw, good blade, lots of water and patience. Come to think of it wood is similar, fun driving nails in really old wood.

I had a house built in 1890, all heart pine.  I broke many a drill bit trying to get a nail into that petrified wood.

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I hardly ever see dump trucks around here. I saw 3 in a row last week. I don't think I'd seen another one previous to that in about a year. I asked someone about getting a dump truck load of manure, and was told that I needed to find someone with a dump trailer. Why no dump trucks? Very little actual building, and no excavation around here.

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Another use for the standard trucks? Building highways - a temporary concrete plant built close by, when pouring loaded into the trucks which back up to the machines laying down the pavement. Faster and cheaper. Grand Parkway around Houston (latest big loop) = 1 million yds concrete. Concrete truck can carry 10 yds = 40,000 lbs.  Smaller dump trucks carry less but still much quicker turnaround.  Only works doing big pours. 

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1 hour ago, hasher said:

I had a house built in 1890.

It's all in the punctuation :lol:

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2 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

I've heard it isn't fun.

Mike Rowe did it on dirty jobs I think.  Evil work....  

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5 hours ago, Chimp too said:

999533536_Dumptruck.jpg.83826c0cb6e3a2aacaa2ffbad627cfb4.jpg

I have often wondered where this Dump Truck ended up. Green Marine build Dubois 54 from early in the IMS era. Sailed on her the first season. Never figured out whether she was a dog or we didn't know what we were doing. Probably the latter.

She spent some time in Dun Laoghaire, renamed Stormbird. After that? No idea.

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3 hours ago, warbird said:

At least the two injured victims didnt get smushed by a 70000 pound truck. 

 

I would take that over those two poor guys in Michigan who were hit back in the 1980s by a truck carrying molten aluminum.

Tons of molten metal poured over the car completely encasing it. Cripes, how would they even get out the remains of the victims?

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16 minutes ago, mikewof said:

I would take that over those two poor guys in Michigan who were hit back in the 1980s by a truck carrying molten aluminum.

Tons of molten metal poured over the car completely encasing it. Cripes, how would they even get out the remains of the victims?

Hoffa?

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53 minutes ago, shaggy said:

Mike Rowe did it on dirty jobs I think.  Evil work....  

It looks pretty simple in the computer animation ...

But I can't imagine the job of climbing into dark, dusty drums several times a day to do that. Fuck, worst job ever.

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10 hours ago, warbird said:

I cannot imagine the job of chipping out a drum.

Why? Just take a jackhammer and climb inside.

What could go wrong?

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I found them, down here in Costa Rica. Well suited to narrow winding mountain roads.

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I see an endless barrage of dump trucks on the last mile of my commute to work every day. Oddly, they’re always painted tan and empty, often in convoy with shiny fire trucks. (Oshkosh Truck test drives all their military vehicles and fire trucks on the same stretch of highway I use). It makes for amusing scenery. 

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16 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Nobody can pimp a truck like the Japanese.

 

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GRUMPY hit the LOTTO ??

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On 1/23/2020 at 4:00 AM, Ed Lada said:

Nobody can pimp a truck like the Japanese.

 

Related image

I would have guessed that was Filipino - looks like a mega-Jeepny.

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On 1/23/2020 at 7:47 AM, warbird said:

 

 

I think the cured on the drum relics are driver error, traffic jam or total power loss.   We had an accident in town last year where a redimix truck ended up on it's side. On coming car crossed center lane and hit a car ahead of the ready mix truck, truck swerved and tipped. At least the two injured victims didnt get smushed by a 70000 pound truck. 

A driver doesn't always have a place to off load 6 yards of concrete when the water tank goes empty.

All sorts of scenarios occur to piss off the boss. 

Chipping out a drum might be a nonstarter.  OSHA work place rules: confined space,  particulate, noise exposure,  air circulation......

I never worked in the industry except to supply material.

NOTE: There is a significant difference between a dump truck, and a concrete truck.

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image.png.38df1168a1378cf0c31828442c7e5597.png

 

image.png.cf0a94048997e96bc804f798f6c14f42.png

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6 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

image.png.38df1168a1378cf0c31828442c7e5597.png

You halve nice truckes Merle                              :)

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8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I would have guessed that was Filipino - looks like a mega-Jeepny.

Definitely Japanese.  While some of the trucks are pimped out strictly for show, there are many that are used daily for their intended purpose.  It's called 'dekotora', and they spend a lot of money on them.  In the video below, you can see these are working trucks transporting stuff, not at some show.  Here is an interesting article about it, which includes the video.  From the article:

"Owners range from young guys, those who typically use their trucks to earn their daily rice, to mature business owners. The younger crowd typically owns smaller trucks and as their income and stature in the world of Truck Guys grows they move on to bigger and more lavishly decorated trucks. Several of the owners I met are also independent business owners like roofing contractors or house construction company owners."

 

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On 1/23/2020 at 7:36 AM, hasher said:

Come to think of it wood is similar, fun driving nails in really old wood.

Yeah, nail guns don't work on the farmhouse. 1851.

3058865093_164ebe6f9e_b.jpg

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Really old fir gets like steel - you have to pre-drill to drive a nail.

Drilling & tapping would probably be practical. :D

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3 hours ago, austin1972 said:

That's what it is - shipboarded fir.

"Shipboarded"?.... Do you mean "ship lapped"?

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Must be a regional colloquialism... Around here "Shipboard" means something happening aboard a ship.

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Ahh, I see how it's going to be now.  Nautical pedantry!

This is the 21st century.  Words can mean whatever people want them to mean!  Feelings and opinions are facts!  To disagree with someone, no matter how respectful is disrespectful!  Delusional fantasies are the same as reality! 

Welcome to the new world order.

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I find it quite helpful to shiplap repeatedly before shipboarding.  Your experiences may differ.

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7 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

I find it quite helpful to shiplap repeatedly before shipboarding.  Your experiences may differ.

I usually prep by drinking heavily first and continue to do so after boarding.  By the time I come back on land, I am usually shipfaced.

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4 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

 Nautical pedantry!

Best kind of pedantry there is. :D

And by the way, it's saloon, not salon - which is where you get your hair cut.

Nor is there such a thing as a cutter/ketch - it's a double heads'l ketch.

Get it right FFS - lives could depend on it.

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7 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Best kind of pedantry there is. :D

And by the way, it's saloon, not salon - which is where you get your hair cut.

Nor is there such a thing as a cutter/ketch - it's a double heads'l ketch.

Get it right FFS - lives could depend on it.

You talking to me?  

I remember writing salon instead saloon years ago.  I never wrote anything about a cutter/ketch, I don't know one from the other without looking it up when I need to know.

Lives without Depends could be a problem, I agree.

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Nope - just taking advantage of an opportunity.

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We had a small batch plant on St John when we were building the Virgin Grand Resort (Now the Hyatt or Westin or whatever). Big improvement over the time it took a concrete truck to pick up a load on St Thomas and catch a barge/vehicle ferry in Red Hook then unload and hightail it out of Cruz Bay to a construction site usually up a narrow steep mountain dirt road/trail. It was almost impossible to get a truck all the way out to Coral Bay or the East End before the load cooked off. You would see drums from trucks that had overturned that had just been unbolted from their journal bearings just off the side of the road. Some local artist started painting the forelorne drums to look like bright turquoise and blue Parrot Fish!

    Even with our own batch plant on the resort site we had a couple of drums between it and my cabinet shop that were rusting away in the gut (island term for deep gully). They must have been rollover victims and had big 4'x4' holes torch cut in the sides to facilitate jack hammer and chipping out the dried concrete. I think they kept the just to threaten the help with threats such as, "if you don't get off your ass and get your work done, I'll send you to the batch plant to chip out drums for a week!"

    I noticed one of the big Rasta groundskeepers coming across the road from the resort proper to the long abandoned construction area where my shop was and he would furtively head for the rusting drums which were nearly grown over by the bush by then. Groundsmen always wear their machetes in a scabbard and I would hear him chopping away for a bit and then silence for a while and he would slink back to the grounds building on the resort proper. He was a very likeable guy and I got along with him well and I couldn't help go take a look and see what he was up to. Two Love was his name (older brother was One Love and little sister was Baby Love...) and was about 6'10" and could crush you if you ever riled him but I snuck up to a drum that I had heard him landscaping and lo and behold he had an excellent garden of herb hidden inside! You had to jump up and pull yourself to the rim of the hole to even see the flowering buds at the tops so it was a pretty clever use of the ruined drums. I kind of wondered how the relatively small hole let in enough rain for his crop and then recalled having seen him coming out from behind my shop building. The shop was a quick and dirty tin roofed with partial walls and chainlink fencing that made it moderately thief proof. I had been allowed to keep the construction company cabinet shop up and running long after the last phase of construction had ended which was great for me. I went around to the back into the narrow gap between the bldg and the cut into the rock hillside and was surprised to see a row of Two Love's prize plants directly under the drip edge of the tin roof awaiting the nurturing rains. He also had run a gutter of sorts along the other edge of the shed and was filling jerry jugs with rainwater which he must have been hauling over to the thirsty drum plantation nearby. 

    I really didn't have a problem with his endeavours other than not leaving me a baggie every harvest for 'rent' or hush money but I knew that if the construction company people still around or even the hotel management ever saw what he was up to I would be the first suspect. Next time he came over to do the water run and pinch some buds back I waited until he came out of the bush with the water cans and told him he was going to get us both busted. He told me he had started off small with his first crop behind the shop but things had expanded quickly and he was making a fortune selling to the tourist at the resort! He agreed to harvest the shop plants and not plant anymore there as the drums grew better product but he still needed the water source from the shop roof. We walked over to the drums and he have me the tour and the guy really knew his shit about his shit! I was pretty impressed and he was pretty generous with his 'sampler' and then I walked over to the batch plant itself and the manifold where the mix is controlled and spun a spigot valve and we both rejoiced to see that the plumbing was still hooked up to the resort R/O unit across the street! Fields of Plenty and unlimited sun and rain and you never saw a happier Rasta!

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22 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Ahh, I see how it's going to be now.  Nautical pedantry!

This is the 21st century.  Words can mean whatever people want them to mean!  Feelings and opinions are facts!  To disagree with someone, no matter how respectful is disrespectful!  Delusional fantasies are the same as reality! 

Welcome to the new world order.

May I quote you?

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9 minutes ago, 4ktsb said:

May I quote you?

Be my guest.  :)

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