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Zonker

Oopsie

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oops.jpg.b397879f243e59e5144f582fa0f9d01b.jpg

Stolen from my wife's Facebook page. No idea of the circumstances. But nice to see it still afloat.

 

 

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For those who still doubt that a catamaran can be secure, I attach some pictures to you that prove the opposite.
I don't have too much information, just that the boat is called Mona, that he is German and that he would have managed to return to the port on his own.

https://www.hisse-et-oh.com/sailing/catamaran-ces-bateaux-qui-ne-coulent-pas

5e32d98439819f2a4fef2bea.jpg.5f3aabff6be4d846157ca215b3bef346.jpg

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On 1/31/2020 at 4:19 AM, Zonker said:

oops.jpg.b397879f243e59e5144f582fa0f9d01b.jpg

Stolen from my wife's Facebook page. No idea of the circumstances. But nice to see it still afloat.

 

 

Iroquois. Same as in the inexperienced couple thread. This one ripped off the center board. 

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Not sure the designer ever intended the iroquois to cross oceans? I think other similar major failures have happened. Pretty sure Charles Dennis (with wife, Sue (?) and newly born infant) lost their iroquois in the Indian Ocean somewhere, perhaps in the1970's? They spent a very long time in a liferaft and were lucky to be picked up by a freighter way outside any known shipping lane. All pre GPS & satellite days.

I think they were on route Whitby, UK, Pacific, NZ, UK; boat might have been called "Snoopy & the Whitby to Tonga Express" but my memory might be a little faulty. I do clearly remember saying that the Iroquois was wholly unsuitable for such a voyage....

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Oh, forgot to say their Iroquis sank; that's why they were in the raft.

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The Mk 1 had aluminium plate - maybe 3/4" thick - tilting centerboards. They were faired out on the leading and trailing edges with a 1" diameter pin upon which they rotated at the bottom of a slot which extended from top to bottom of the front of the case. The boards vibrated like hell over 6 or 7 knots.

I thought the Mk 2 - pictured - had thicker, better shaped wooden boards?

So the damage we see in the picture shows the centerboard case split in half and the board has carried away the hull section outboard of the case with that half the case?

Sail Craft used beautiful birds eye maple for the rudder blades. Did they make the boards out of the same material?

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On 2/2/2020 at 8:52 PM, Chapter Four said:

The middle fell off!

He he!  I think technically the side fell off.  

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Duh! 

But why? Still plenty of Iroquois out there - damn fine boats and years ahead of their time.

Anybody with something helpful for current owners? More details would be beneficial to them.

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My recollection was that the Charles Dennis Iroquios was a Mk2 (did it have the fatter sterns with engines) and that the failure was not caused by it hitting something. So failure due to fatigue/previous damage/repair or.....

It was on route back to the UK from NZ so had seen some pretty rough conditions. Perhaps an extra thorough inspection of that area of the hull when next hauled out if you worry about this sort of thing?

Pretty tough well built boats I thought, just not the obvious choice for a "Round the World" trip.

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Where was the photo taken? NZ, UK, or somewhere in between, I guess.

They are pretty cool boats.

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I guess the case would have split first and the resultant sideways slamming went to work on the hull with the, apparently, strong board pivoting on the deck slot.

My Dad bought a Mk 1 in late August 1966. After she was launched, during the acceptance trial sail, a leak showed up at the bottom front of the port centerboard case. The boat was hauled and the area prepped and reinforced that night, the starboard side was not reinforced. We left Brightlingsea two days later and on the 5th of September we survived a force ten storm in the straights of Dover. Never had any issues with the boards and cases in the eleven years we tried to bust that boat! Her second owner, Paul Smedley, circumnavigated in her. She was called Alleda and, to my knowledge, was the only Mk 1 to do so. Wonderful little boat.

 

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I think I first saw this photo in the first page of inexperienced couple buy a  pos catamaran thread

 

A little tracing backwards gets to the following from 2009

Which google translates to: "On August 30th the German yacht "Mona" got into big trouble in the North Sea. Parts of the outer skin on starboard were torn off in heavy seas. The ship stayed but buoyant and could reach a port."

A bit more digging produces the following link with a bit more info and additional photos.

Google translate offers the following: "Around half past six the lifeboat Koopmansdank was called up for the report. The 9.5 meter long catamaran with cabin was en route from Harich to Brouwershaven. Near a buoy, the boat hit something hard. Because of this a large piece of one of the floats tore off the boat. A leak occurred and the rescuers from the Neeltje Jans KNRM station were called in to help the boat, called the 'Mona'. A pilot boat provided assistance until the lifeboat arrived. The Koopmansdank has accompanied the yacht to the outer harbor of the Roompot lock. It is moored there. According to a KNRM spokesperson, there was a serious damage."

and offers the additional images:

20147.jpg

20148.jpg

20149.jpg

 

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Well played KC375! Thanks.

So the deck slot for the board is intact looking like the board (a streamlined alloy sheet like the Mk 1) fell out with the case.

The shot above “at sea” clearly shows the beautiful sapele faced interior cabinetry confirming the entire case blew out.

Looks like an example of making the board TOO strong for the surrounding structure.

Check out the jib - must have been a lively day!

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2 hours ago, boardhead said:

Well played KC375! Thanks.

So the deck slot for the board is intact looking like the board (a streamlined alloy sheet like the Mk 1) fell out with the case.

The shot above “at sea” clearly shows the beautiful sapele faced interior cabinetry confirming the entire case blew out.

Looks like an example of making the board TOO strong for the surrounding structure.

Check out the jib - must have been a lively day!

Yes, a lively day on the water sums it up well.

And absolutely you want the board to fail before the case.

But I would not have thought that than an issue with a center board as opposed to dagger board.

Given a pivoting center board...it might be enough for the cleat on the down haul (if there is one) to fail first.

I’m intrigued by the mod of failure. It looks like there might have been a lot of lateral force involved...if lateral blow then even more challenging to engineer as I would think you want to engineer the board for lateral loading...

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If the boards were the same on the Mk 2 as the Mk1 (what’s left looks the same) the uphaul/downhaul lines could be cleated to position the boards in any position from full down to fully retracted. We tore one of those cleats out once when the board hit something and the board retracted, no case damage.

The boards were unusual in as much as the shape beneath the boat was like an 80 degree segment of a circle and the shape in the case was essentially a triangle where the board was fully down when the triangle top tip was hauled to the aft end of the deck slot and fully retracted when the tip was hauled foreword.

The opening underwater was full length like the deck.

I think the damage must have been caused by a severe lateral blow - but from inboard outwards, below water!  On the Mk1 the draft was 11” - 4’ 6” so only 3’ 7” of board projected out of the bottom of the case.

Big fish (whale) or a sub periscope!!! Who knows.

 

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6 hours ago, KC375 said:

I think I first saw this photo in the first page of inexperienced couple buy a  pos catamaran thread

 

A little tracing backwards gets to the following from 2009

Which google translates to: "On August 30th the German yacht "Mona" got into big trouble in the North Sea. Parts of the outer skin on starboard were torn off in heavy seas. The ship stayed but buoyant and could reach a port."

A bit more digging produces the following link with a bit more info and additional photos.

Google translate offers the following: "Around half past six the lifeboat Koopmansdank was called up for the report. The 9.5 meter long catamaran with cabin was en route from Harich to Brouwershaven. Near a buoy, the boat hit something hard. Because of this a large piece of one of the floats tore off the boat. A leak occurred and the rescuers from the Neeltje Jans KNRM station were called in to help the boat, called the 'Mona'. A pilot boat provided assistance until the lifeboat arrived. The Koopmansdank has accompanied the yacht to the outer harbor of the Roompot lock. It is moored there. According to a KNRM spokesperson, there was a serious damage."

and offers the additional images:

20147.jpg

20148.jpg

20149.jpg

 

i think i first saw this here.... in this thread. funny how things run full circle.

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On 2/15/2020 at 6:59 AM, KC375 said:

I think I first saw this photo in the first page of inexperienced couple buy a  pos catamaran thread

 

This thread got a mention in the most recent video.  Another circle.

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Pretty sure that’s a different Mk 2 Iroquois.

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