squiby

J/122 clutch upgrades

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I picked up used J/122e last summer and am slowly addressing some of the problems. The boat came with Antal V-Grip 10-12 clutches and they don’t cut it. I have to leave the main and jib halyards on winches as soon as the wind is over 8kts. The cams are clean and not worn out with properly sized lines. The Antals are rated at only 500kg holding power which is less than half of the load rating for the Spinlock XCS or XTS that seem to have come standard on most J/122s. But I’ve seen pics of some raced 122s with upgraded Spinlock XXA or XXB clutches on the cabin top. Anyone know if the XXA will handle the halyard loads? Or should I step all the way up to XXB?

I’m adding a code zero to the inventory so I may also need a high load clutch for one of my spin halyards and the tack line. For the other cabin top lines I’ve been considering the newer XTR clutches. Like the XX but unlike the older XTS/XCS, the XTRs don’t have to be removed from the cabin top to remove the cams for service or replacement. Anyone go through the upgrade process and able to share some feedback?

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For the main halyard consider a 2:1 it cuts the load in half. I would also move away from a clutch on the main halyard and go with a jammer. 

For the jib and spin they need to live on a winch or they are going to slip. 

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Went to Ronstan constrictors on the halyards  had brand new slipping spinlocks and we never have slipping halyard now and they don't eat the line

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+1 on the constrictors, I’ve raced many 122s and the clutches never hold but to be fair they very rarely do on any production cruiser racer. Spinlock XX clutches should do the trick but make sure your halyards are also not worn out. The constrictors will hold and not let go whatever and for the holding power they should be a fraction of the weight of a spinlock XX and also cheaper, your crew would need an education in how to use them because they’re not as intuitive to begin with as a standard clutch with handle. We also race a SF3600 and switched every pit line to a constrictor, we run the spinnaker halyard 1:1 and fly a code 0 from that, we do the back stay eased clip the tack down, wind the halyard until barely able to wind anymore tension on and then pull the backstay on tight and the constrictor takes the load and doesn’t creep

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The Antal V Cams that J/Boats are using now are fully a cost-saving measure and they're truly not effective.

XX Clutches for the Main and Jib halyards. XC Spinlocks should be pretty good for all the control lines and kite halyards.

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On 2/6/2020 at 11:52 PM, IMR said:

For the main halyard consider a 2:1 it cuts the load in half. I would also move away from a clutch on the main halyard and go with a jammer. 

For the jib and spin they need to live on a winch or they are going to slip. 

I've never used jammers. Why do you prefer it over a clutch? Is there a brand or model you like?

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On 2/7/2020 at 9:54 AM, JL92S said:

+1 on the constrictors, I’ve raced many 122s and the clutches never hold but to be fair they very rarely do on any production cruiser racer. Spinlock XX clutches should do the trick but make sure your halyards are also not worn out. The constrictors will hold and not let go whatever and for the holding power they should be a fraction of the weight of a spinlock XX and also cheaper, your crew would need an education in how to use them because they’re not as intuitive to begin with as a standard clutch with handle. We also race a SF3600 and switched every pit line to a constrictor, we run the spinnaker halyard 1:1 and fly a code 0 from that, we do the back stay eased clip the tack down, wind the halyard until barely able to wind anymore tension on and then pull the backstay on tight and the constrictor takes the load and doesn’t creep

I used the ronstan constrictors briefly on a Black Pepper Code 2 for a delivery from Brittany to the Canaries last year but found them problematic. They were slipping but the loads were much higher on that boat than on my 122. I'm also a bit concerned about the constrictors as they're sold for a particular line diameter in millimeters and there's a lot of potential for variation in line diameters, especially as they age. The lines on my boat are a variety of vintage and manufacturer so sizing doesn't perfectly match the ronstan specs. But it looks like you can swap out the socks once worn or incorrectly sized? If a line was slipping with one diameter sock, can you step down to the next size smaller sock to solve it? What other tweaking or maintenance is required?

If the price wasn't so prohibitive I'd lean towards a bunch of XXB clutches for simplicity and forgiveness of line diameter variation. But considering the weight and price savings, maybe the constrictors are worth learning.

J92S, your dad came up to say hello in Vineyard Haven harbor last summer while cruising the US east coast. The boat still had evidence of it's Scottish provenance on the transom. Your parents then came out for a fun sail. I'd only had the boat for a few weeks at that point so it was good to have some experienced 122 sailors aboard. Hopefully they're enjoying some warm weather sailing in the Caribbean for the winter.

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Main Halyard, 2:1 as IMR said.  Then Double Clutch it, or tie it off to a cleat or leave it on a Self Tailing Winch.  

Genoa Halyard has to be left on Self Tailing Winch, or it WILL slip!

Kite Halyards, add Core Insert at Clutch area and be prepared to place on Self Tailing Winch when in breeze!

Tack Line, same as Main Halyard!

 

 

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23 hours ago, squiby said:

I've never used jammers. Why do you prefer it over a clutch? Is there a brand or model you like?

I have had good results with the zs jammers. The difference between a jammer and a clutch is a jammer can not be opened under load. A clutch should not be opened under load but it can be. With a jammer you have to take up on the winch first before you can open it. 

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23 hours ago, squiby said:

I used the ronstan constrictors briefly on a Black Pepper Code 2 for a delivery from Brittany to the Canaries last year but found them problematic. They were slipping but the loads were much higher on that boat than on my 122. I'm also a bit concerned about the constrictors as they're sold for a particular line diameter in millimeters and there's a lot of potential for variation in line diameters, especially as they age. The lines on my boat are a variety of vintage and manufacturer so sizing doesn't perfectly match the ronstan specs. But it looks like you can swap out the socks once worn or incorrectly sized? If a line was slipping with one diameter sock, can you step down to the next size smaller sock to solve it? What other tweaking or maintenance is required?

If the price wasn't so prohibitive I'd lean towards a bunch of XXB clutches for simplicity and forgiveness of line diameter variation. But considering the weight and price savings, maybe the constrictors are worth learning.

J92S, your dad came up to say hello in Vineyard Haven harbor last summer while cruising the US east coast. The boat still had evidence of it's Scottish provenance on the transom. Your parents then came out for a fun sail. I'd only had the boat for a few weeks at that point so it was good to have some experienced 122 sailors aboard. Hopefully they're enjoying some warm weather sailing in the Caribbean for the winter.

They enjoyed their sail on your boat very much and have made it down to the Bahamas! Our lines are all technora/polyester braid covers so not sure if that adds to their grip but the diameter of the constrictor is specific to the nearest 1mm but no finer. They can be changed out if worn or if you wanted to change line diameter you can swap them out. You could maybe trial a single constrictor in your pit area and see if it works for you on your boat, if you don’t think it will work for your setup then at least you haven’t invested too heavily.

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