FinnFish

I'd like to thank the previous owner for...

Recommended Posts

Protecting all the winches from corrosion by carefully packing each one with the three types of grease known to man. 

Brown heavy duty machine grease, over laid by blue trailer bearing grease, topped off with some form of white grease.

Love ya work. 

20200216_143943.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

did he drill and tap a zirc fitting into the body?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a cheesecake with a bombe Alaska on top 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the PO put 90W in the engine too? Higher number = more better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you're welcome ;-) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd prefer corrosion maybe?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Move yo ass to the Sweetwater Seas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're going to need a bigger brush.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is so wrong.  A light lithium grease (Barlube, Harken) sparingly applied to the gears, shafts and bearing cages is all that is needed.  DO NOT apply grease to the pawls/springs , only a light machine oil.

When the time comes the key to winch maintenance is to clean the old oxidized grease & crud from all parts in a pan of diesel with a scrub brush, dry and reassemble per above using your cleaned fingers, just a thin film on all parts.  I shudder when I see a "winch expert" pack the winch completely full  of trailer bearing grease because "more is better."  Essentially, winches are overgrown watches, not axle bearings running under high load at 60mph for thousands of miles.

Free bonus advice.  Cover your winches when not in use to reduce crud entry & temperature extremes, and after a lively day where lines are salt encrusted or the winch is briefly submerged hose them down with fresh water before putting them to bed with a cover to get the salt out just like you do with deck blocks, etc.

BTW, the winch in the picture looks to be destroyed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel like the rest of us are supposed to join in?

I'd like to thank the previous owner for this wiring job:
DSC_0002.thumb.JPG.cb7eb57f3b7145869e773d7be809930f.JPG

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

I feel like the rest of us are supposed to join in?

I'd like to thank the previous owner for this wiring job:
DSC_0002.thumb.JPG.cb7eb57f3b7145869e773d7be809930f.JPG

 

 

 

 I would... it has labels and no rusty choc-blocks! If I could get mine to that state it would be a significant improvement...

 I need to sort mine out but am wary of where to start- suggestions on good practice would be welcome!

Cheers,

               W.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, WGWarburton said:

 I would... it has labels and no rusty choc-blocks! If I could get mine to that state it would be a significant improvement...

 I need to sort mine out but am wary of where to start- suggestions on good practice would be welcome!

Cheers,

               W.

I'd actually already got rid of the choc blocks, in the background you can see an Earthing Bus Bar I put in to last me to the end of the season. Labels were on masking tape and the ink was mostly illegible.

Theres tons of info online on how to do stuff like this & it helps to look at photos of other peoples work for inspiration, this is what mine looks like now, not shown but done after are removing the old water filler. (Last place I need leaks) & improving the power feeds.

IMG_20180625_154717.thumb.jpg.8e39139d97f19f1654f17c8feea2695f.jpg

 

It still needs work though, I don't like the way the wires have to bend to go into the top entry connectors. I'll probably space out the organiser conduit to help it.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume that deck fill is for diesel rather than water. ABYC frowns on filling your electrical cabinet with water but diesel's okay.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, IStream said:

I assume that deck fill is for diesel rather than water. ABYC frowns on filling your electrical cabinet with water but diesel's okay.

The deck fill is gone. But it was originally water. European boat so ABYC standards don't apply, in fact at the time of contruction I'm not sure if any standards at all existed for boats this size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that I'd necessarily blame the PO - That OP looks like most factory electrical installations to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

IMG_20180625_154717.thumb.jpg.8e39139d97f19f1654f17c8feea2695f.jpg

 

 

It still needs work though, I don't like the way the wires have to bend to go into the top entry connectors. I'll probably space out the organiser conduit to help it.

I'd recommend Prozac or Zoloft instead. ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

The deck fill is gone. But it was originally water. European boat so ABYC standards don't apply, in fact at the time of contruction I'm not sure if any standards at all existed for boats this size.

I should've used the sarcasm font. I was referring to the fact that the hose was gone in the second picture, presumably because you intended to multipurpose the electrical cabinet into a small tank. See? Funny!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@IStream Maybe I should put a glass front on it & fill it with oil? I've seen people do that with computer cases. 
 

@SloopJonB I always let perfect get in the way of good enough. Which is probably why my refit will never be 'finished'. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/17/2020 at 6:10 AM, ropetrick said:

That is such a cute little baby winch.

I think its a bearing buddy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

@IStream Maybe I should put a glass front on it & fill it with oil? I've seen people do that with computer cases. 

Even if you don't fill it with oil, I love the idea of the glass front. Gotta show off all that pretty work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MiddayGun said:

I feel like the rest of us are supposed to join in?

I'd like to thank the previous owner for this wiring job:
DSC_0002.thumb.JPG.cb7eb57f3b7145869e773d7be809930f.JPG

 

 

 

the one on our boat was much worse when we bought it. I'm slowly trying to improve it, but I don't know if I'll ever get to the level of your after picture. Working in there while  leaning over the chart table isn't much fun either. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

 

@SloopJonB I always let perfect get in the way of good enough. Which is probably why my refit will never be 'finished'. 

Well then you should have painted the board that stuff is mounted to.

Now you have to pull it all off so you can paint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/16/2020 at 8:53 PM, FinnFish said:

Protecting all the winches from corrosion by carefully packing each one with the three types of grease known to man. 

Brown heavy duty machine grease, over laid by blue trailer bearing grease, topped off with some form of white grease.

Love ya work. 

 

That reminds me of a thank you I never gave the previous owner of the wooden schooner I ran for a couple years.  

I'd like to thank that owner for:

-Making sure there were three different DC systems for the boat so I never had to worry about having enough electricity.

-Mixing and matching 12v, 24v, and 36v accessories, bulbs, and appropriate wiring to ensure that there was always something easy to do for new crew initiation tasks

-Setting up the 240 and 120 circuits similarly carefully; who says Home Depot isn't good for high voltage marine electronics?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

That reminds me of a thank you I never gave the previous owner of the wooden schooner I ran for a couple years.  

I'd like to thank that owner for:

-Making sure there were three different DC systems for the boat so I never had to worry about having enough electricity.

-Mixing and matching 12v, 24v, and 36v accessories, bulbs, and appropriate wiring to ensure that there was always something easy to do for new crew initiation tasks

-Setting up the 240 and 120 circuits similarly carefully; who says Home Depot isn't good for high voltage marine electronics?

 

 

No three phase? Damn.. seems a pity to go to all that effort and not complete the set...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Well then you should have painted the board that stuff is mounted to.

Now you have to pull it all off so you can paint.

Yeah, that was my first thought. And refinish the overhead in there.

However, @MiddayGun that there is sweet wiring. Anyone have a favorite USA online source for that type of kit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Well then you should have painted the board that stuff is mounted to.

Now you have to pull it all off so you can paint.

you Sir are a bastard :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, MiddayGun said:

I'd actually already got rid of the choc blocks, in the background you can see an Earthing Bus Bar I put in to last me to the end of the season. Labels were on masking tape and the ink was mostly illegible.

Theres tons of info online on how to do stuff like this & it helps to look at photos of other peoples work for inspiration, this is what mine looks like now, not shown but done after are removing the old water filler. (Last place I need leaks) & improving the power feeds.

IMG_20180625_154717.thumb.jpg.8e39139d97f19f1654f17c8feea2695f.jpg

 

It still needs work though, I don't like the way the wires have to bend to go into the top entry connectors. I'll probably space out the organiser conduit to help it.

likey, what components are those?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mid said:

you Sir are a bastard :)

Nope - an enabler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@SloopJonB I was thinking maybe some teak veeer & several coats of varnish? Nah I'm going to satisfy myself with some heat shrink labelling on the wires & calling it quits.

@Grande Mastere Dreade & @El Boracho
The kit I used is WAGO kit, I got the idea of a photo I saw of a Hallberg Rassy installation, but the phoenix kit that they used was a little too pricy for me.

The range is this stuff:
https://www.wago.com/global/c/rail-mount-terminal-blocks
These were the fuse holders, the take mini blade fuses the same as modern cars. I bought the none LED version.
https://www.wago.com/global/rail-mount-terminal-blocks/2-conductor-fuse-terminal-block/p/282-698_281-413

All DIN mounted, I can't find the receipts in my inbox so I can't remember exactly where I bought then from, probably RS Components.
The rest of the stuff like the slotted conduit & wire tidy's were all from RS components as well, as usual when ordering from industrial suppliers you need to sit down with pen & paper and work out exactly what you need as its not done for you.

They do terminal blocks in blue also which I used for the negatives.
In this current setup the blocks with fuses at the bottom are always live when then the power is on, I use these for stuff like lights, the gas alarm and the 12v sockets around the cabin.  The switch panel has a power feed running from the main power in fuse block which is then distributed to each of the switches. From there they run to the top fused block & finally to wherever they are going. So I uses switches not breakers.

The cool part about these terminal blocks is that you can buy bridging connectors to daisy chain them together, so you can run multiple circuits of one switch / fuse, say all the nav equipment, or all the cabin lights. They are a spring release system for the wire that takes either single or multi strand wire with no chance of vibration loosening them.
The blue earth connectors are all bridged to common them & I used a couple of wires to the DC - at each end which should be more than adequate for the current that they see.

I changed the power feed to a standard distribution post.

I feel like a salesman now. Sorry to hijack your thread FinnFish

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that info @MiddayGun 

I noticed that bridging solution. That was exactly an issue I was having with other kits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

@SloopJonB I was thinking maybe some teak veeer & several coats of varnish? Nah I'm going to satisfy myself with some heat shrink labelling on the wires & calling it quits.

 

That Prozac is effective stuff isn't it. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

No three phase? Damn.. seems a pity to go to all that effort and not complete the set...

Shut up - I'm seriously thinking of installing a 3 phase motor for an anchor winch, fed via VFD from my 240V single phase inverter.

But if you buy one of these AND ACTUALLY USE IT at least you (and subsequent owners) will know what does what....

https://www.ecotechprintsolutions.com.au/catalog/product/view/id/5841/?SID=kpmddstc6oia11bbke9gs0ifru&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIiarz-7Df5wIVE66WCh0xGQHuEAQYAiABEgLT2vD_BwE

FKT

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smashed hull, panic attack, wife, exactly where she sat on her trailer, dirty pool, much suffering to fix properly.  Rotten.  Etc.  Fuck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For fixing snapped battens with scotch tape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

for not sealing all the holes when he added / replaced the deck hardware ...  

This. Also, for using a different random fastener size and head pattern for every single repair including, I shit you not, a flat head machine screw he/she turned into a "Philips head" using a Dremel.

Just rebuilt the deck and there are now only three different size fasteners, and all screws are Philips head. I don't want the next skipper coming to murder me in my sleep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, green03 said:

For fixing a hole below the waterline with caulk.

I think we have a winner.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to thank the PO for using bolts 2" too long to mount some turning blocks on the deck, which coincidentally happened to be just above the entrance to the head. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, CyberBOB said:

I would like to thank the PO for using bolts 2" too long to mount some turning blocks on the deck, which coincidentally happened to be just above the entrance to the head. 

angle grinder with a cutoff wheel would have taken care of that after the first time..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

angle grinder with a cutoff wheel would have taken care of that after the first time..

That is exactly what happened.  But I did bark my head on it once before I cut those suckers off.

I wonder if the PO replaced it just before I bought it, or if he had it like that for a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I confess. I sold my boat that used a lot of Robertson screws to an American. But just for fun, because I was sometimes in places where there were not an abundance of s.s. screws for sale, I'd throw a Phillips in just because I could. Or use 2 different size Robertson heads (#6 and #8 use different size screwdrivers) on the same fitting.

The previous owner plumbed the toilet to flush with fresh water. From a fresh water tank that was at best 40 gallons. And the water tanks didn't have vents. They just sucked air in through the fill cap!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to thank the previous owner(s) of several boats I've purchased for spending a butt load of money for a new boat, using it for a couple years and then selling it to me for pennies on the dollar.:D

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Zonker said:

I confess. I sold my boat that used a lot of Robertson screws to an American. But just for fun, because I was sometimes in places where there were not an abundance of s.s. screws for sale, I'd throw a Phillips in just because I could. Or use 2 different size Robertson heads (#6 and #8 use different size screwdrivers) on the same fitting.

I use a ton of countersunk socket head cap screws because I like them way better than Philips heads. And every one of them is metric, which is fine for the 98% of the world in the 21st Century WRT measurement & fastener systems, but is guaranteed to cause USA heads to explode...

FKT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, J24TrickBag said:

This. Also, for using a different random fastener size and head pattern for every single repair including, I shit you not, a flat head machine screw he/she turned into a "Philips head" using a Dremel.

Just rebuilt the deck and there are now only three different size fasteners, and all screws are Philips head. I don't want the next skipper coming to murder me in my sleep.

I'm in the middle of a complete refastening job - my second on a fiberglass boat. :D

I end up with 2 styles - Phillips if they show, because they look better and Robertson if they don't because they are a much better head.

I like to have the lengths exact so I can use acorn nuts on all exposed fasteners - looks much better and they don't rip your scalp open.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I use a ton of countersunk socket head cap screws because I like them way better than Philips heads. And every one of them is metric, which is fine for the 98% of the world in the 21st Century WRT measurement & fastener systems, but is guaranteed to cause USA heads to explode...

FKT

A win/win practice. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I use a ton of countersunk socket head cap screws because I like them way better than Philips heads. And every one of them is metric, which is fine for the 98% of the world in the 21st Century WRT measurement & fastener systems, but is guaranteed to cause USA heads to explode...

FKT

Nah. Metric's fine for many of us 'mercans. What makes our heads explode is mixing metric and imperial on the same boat/car/machine.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, IStream said:

Nah. Metric's fine for many of us 'mercans. What makes our heads explode is mixing metric and imperial on the same boat/car/machine.

Bingo. I couldn't give a crap about what head types are used (except flat heads), so long as they're all the same (and preferably easy to source spares for- I don't know where I would find Robertson fasteners near me... Maybe Fastenal.).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, IStream said:

Nah. Metric's fine for many of us 'mercans. What makes our heads explode is mixing metric and imperial on the same boat/car/machine.

That makes everyone's head explode.

Another forum, an American who'd got a job to supply an item of equipment to a metric country, where the PO said all fasteners had to be metric, seriously asked if it'd be OK to mill the hex heads of UNF/UNC bolts to the nearest metric size because he didn't want to invest in the necessary metric sized drills & taps for the job.

He got told in no uncertain terms that the answer was NO.....

FKT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to thank the PO for installing the cheap ass car stereo speakers into the nice mahogany bulkheads with a firkin hatchet!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

That makes everyone's head explode.

Another forum, an American who'd got a job to supply an item of equipment to a metric country, where the PO said all fasteners had to be metric, seriously asked if it'd be OK to mill the hex heads of UNF/UNC bolts to the nearest metric size because he didn't want to invest in the necessary metric sized drills & taps for the job.

He got told in no uncertain terms that the answer was NO.....

FKT

Jesus. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I use a ton of countersunk socket head cap screws because I like them way better than Philips heads. And every one of them is metric, which is fine for the 98% of the world in the 21st Century WRT measurement & fastener systems, but is guaranteed to cause USA heads to explode...

FKT

not really, for about $4 we can go to harbor freight and buy a bit set with about 40 different bits...  and if you own a foreign branded car, you end up with a metric set of tools anyway...   what i hate are the old slotted screws,  never have a screwdriver that fits the slot properly...  when one of those comes out, it gets tossed in the water, for some future archeologist to find..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, IStream said:

Nah. Metric's fine for many of us 'mercans. What makes our heads explode is mixing metric and imperial on the same boat/car/machine.

what makes my head explode is using the same diameter screw, but alternating with either coarse or fine thread  and having to put that shit back together..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

what makes my head explode is using the same diameter screw, but alternating with either coarse or fine thread  and having to put that shit back together..

That's grounds for justifiable homicide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to thank the PO for building the boat to a fine standard, then never trying to maintain anything on the boat himself, leaving it to the pros at one of the best, maybe THE best yard, in New England. Boat came with basically no issues.

He even left Bermuda and NS/Newfie charts aboard.

Thanks George!

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, J24TrickBag said:

Bingo. I couldn't give a crap about what head types are used (except flat heads), so long as they're all the same (and preferably easy to source spares for- I don't know where I would find Robertson fasteners near me... Maybe Fastenal.).

They're called "Square Drive" in the States.

Name had to be changed because of NIH.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My PO and his wife ran a skippered charter service with my boat and, like CL, paid pros to do most of the systems installs and maintenance. With very few exceptions, I've been pleasantly surprised when digging into most dark corners of the boat.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Triple spreader Painted carbon rig ...one of the POs glassed the spreaders on AFTER undercoating the spar . As a consequence the spreaders peel off after a sporty Gybe or if the main gets dumped too far . Have peeled two off so far in 2 months ... only 4 to go and it’s fixed ! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, 44forty said:

Triple spreader Painted carbon rig ...one of the POs glassed the spreaders on AFTER undercoating the spar . As a consequence the spreaders peel off after a sporty Gybe or if the main gets dumped too far . Have peeled two off so far in 2 months ... only 4 to go and it’s fixed ! 

Sounds like a sports boat.. which one?  (I am hoping it isn’t yellow)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2020 at 9:40 AM, IStream said:

I assume that deck fill is for diesel rather than water. ABYC frowns on filling your electrical cabinet with water but diesel's okay.

Where I work, we actually drilled drain holes in the electrical cabinets to solve the water problem. Worked great, for a little while!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2020 at 10:41 PM, MiddayGun said:

@SloopJonB I was thinking maybe some teak veeer & several coats of varnish? Nah I'm going to satisfy myself with some heat shrink labelling on the wires & calling it quits.

@Grande Mastere Dreade & @El Boracho
The kit I used is WAGO kit, I got the idea of a photo I saw of a Hallberg Rassy installation, but the phoenix kit that they used was a little too pricy for me.

The range is this stuff:
https://www.wago.com/global/c/rail-mount-terminal-blocks
These were the fuse holders, the take mini blade fuses the same as modern cars. I bought the none LED version.
https://www.wago.com/global/rail-mount-terminal-blocks/2-conductor-fuse-terminal-block/p/282-698_281-413

All DIN mounted, I can't find the receipts in my inbox so I can't remember exactly where I bought then from, probably RS Components.
The rest of the stuff like the slotted conduit & wire tidy's were all from RS components as well, as usual when ordering from industrial suppliers you need to sit down with pen & paper and work out exactly what you need as its not done for you.

They do terminal blocks in blue also which I used for the negatives.
In this current setup the blocks with fuses at the bottom are always live when then the power is on, I use these for stuff like lights, the gas alarm and the 12v sockets around the cabin.  The switch panel has a power feed running from the main power in fuse block which is then distributed to each of the switches. From there they run to the top fused block & finally to wherever they are going. So I uses switches not breakers.

The cool part about these terminal blocks is that you can buy bridging connectors to daisy chain them together, so you can run multiple circuits of one switch / fuse, say all the nav equipment, or all the cabin lights. They are a spring release system for the wire that takes either single or multi strand wire with no chance of vibration loosening them.
The blue earth connectors are all bridged to common them & I used a couple of wires to the DC - at each end which should be more than adequate for the current that they see.

I changed the power feed to a standard distribution post.

I feel like a salesman now. Sorry to hijack your thread FinnFish

Just a head’s up, don’t buy the marketing nonsense about the spring terminals not vibrating loose. We’ve had far more issues with that style than the old school screw terminals. This is based on a sample size of a million square foot factory full of electrical cabinets. I really like Wago, but just don’t trust those terminal strips anymore. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn’t the owner, just a lowly boat nanny, but I bet the next owners loved us. We bedded EVERY SINGLE bolt throughout an entire GL70 in 5200!  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

That makes everyone's head explode.

Another forum, an American who'd got a job to supply an item of equipment to a metric country, where the PO said all fasteners had to be metric, seriously asked if it'd be OK to mill the hex heads of UNF/UNC bolts to the nearest metric size because he didn't want to invest in the necessary metric sized drills & taps for the job.

He got told in no uncertain terms that the answer was NO.....

FKT

That idea is so fucked up that Ford used it during their transition to Metric. They knew the fuckwit shadetree buyers of their crap would be confounded by the wrenches not fitting right. So the put non-standard metric heads on metric bolts so the good old boys could hammer on US sockets .... or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

not really, for about $4 we can go to harbor freight and buy a bit set with about 40 different bits...  and if you own a foreign branded car, you end up with a metric set of tools anyway...   what i hate are the old slotted screws,  never have a screwdriver that fits the slot properly...  when one of those comes out, it gets tossed in the water, for some future archeologist to find..

Never been in a Harbor Freight, and never plan to either. And I prefer slotted screws over philips. More bearing surface with the blade

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

 I prefer slotted screws over philips. More bearing surface with the blade

If that was intended to be purple font you can ignore the following;

You are a severely disturbed person and should seek counselling before you stab yourself with a screwdriver.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2020 at 11:53 AM, SloopJonB said:

Well then you should have painted the board that stuff is mounted to.

Now you have to pull it all off so you can paint.

Those raceway caps need a little filing on the ends too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

not really, for about $4 we can go to harbor freight and buy a bit set with about 40 different bits...  and if you own a foreign branded car, you end up with a metric set of tools anyway...   what i hate are the old slotted screws,  never have a screwdriver that fits the slot properly...  when one of those comes out, it gets tossed in the water, for some future archeologist to find..

Those cheap shit screwdriver heads don't fit anything properly.

OTOH there is a process called "dressing" a screwdriver, wherein the user takes a machine file (fine) and make the tip flat & straight & square. You need a vise to do this. Makes an amazing difference. Phillips screwdrivers can be "dressed" too but it's a little more involved.

- DSK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wrong on two counts - they should be bronze, not brass and they should be countersunk and plugged, not left showing.

You need to up your game - Your OCD is nowhere near needing medication.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/20/2020 at 3:45 PM, See Level said:

I'd like to thank the previous owner(s) of several boats I've purchased for spending a butt load of money for a new boat, using it for a couple years and then selling it to me for pennies on the dollar.:D

Agreed. That's my thanks. Lovely Swan I've sailed on for decades for an amazingly low sum. Told the owner I'd keep the name and the tradition going.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Those cheap shit screwdriver heads don't fit anything properly.

OTOH there is a process called "dressing" a screwdriver, wherein the user takes a machine file (fine) and make the tip flat & straight & square. You need a vise to do this. Makes an amazing difference. Phillips screwdrivers can be "dressed" too but it's a little more involved.

- DSK

Exactly. I do this often on a fine grinding wheel. In difficult situations one may also grind away the taper so as to put the torque into the bottom of the slot. Impact bits are often ground that way from the factory.

An advantage of Phillips over slots is they are simpler to drill out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/18/2020 at 3:39 PM, axolotl said:

This is so wrong.  A light lithium grease (Barlube, Harken) sparingly applied to the gears, shafts and bearing cages is all that is needed.  DO NOT apply grease to the pawls/springs , only a light machine oil.

I use a 3M grease made for the food industry that is water and temperature resistant. I can go from a freezer to the kitchen and still stay fluid. The big thing with winches when your boat is stored near the beach is, the grit that the winds whip up and get in the device. You gotta clean them all the time.

I recently found a Silicone Oil that my son got with his Shoei Helmet. OMG, I need to get a small can of this stuff. I bet the pawls would love this stuff.

I used to work at a company that made silicon products, stuff they use in Hollywood special effects and some extreme products... They produced a Silicone Grease that was real sticky. They use in in outer space (ISS) and on air craft that go through extreme temperature change. About 1 oz went for about $100 20 years ago. I have a small canister and am not sure where to use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I figure winch grease fails due to salt. Saltwater enters the winch, the water component evaporates leaving a salty mush which gets ground into the grease. Eventually turning it hard. Doesn’t matter what type of grease.

Maybe a fresh water sailor can comment? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

These will bring you much Karma for using.

1660-69-250.png

 

8MG.jpg?1565225202

27330-27334_12_1.jpg

F0251508-01.jpg

 

imagehandler.ashx?t=sh&id=1004856&s=n&in

:P

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mid said:

8MG.jpg?1565225202

 

 

When I was in the Islands, we used to call these "Puerto Rican Socket Sets".

  • Like 3
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/20/2020 at 12:42 PM, J24TrickBag said:

This. Also, for using a different random fastener size and head pattern for every single repair including, I shit you not, a flat head machine screw he/she turned into a "Philips head" using a Dremel.

Just rebuilt the deck and there are now only three different size fasteners, and all screws are Philips head. I don't want the next skipper coming to murder me in my sleep.

I'm just finishing up a complete overhaul of a race boat where the previous owner - a very good sailor and total butcher of a craftsman - never used matched fasteners on any single item.  For example, the barrel bolt latch on the companionway hatchboard.  It was "installed" with a philips head flathead screw (not countersunk), a robertson panhead screw, a slot round head screw, and a hex head bolt. 

This is on a fitting you see every time you enter the boat.  I'm leaving that one for now, just to remind myself of the holy mess there used to be. 

I swear he had a quart jar of random, salvaged bolts and fasteners and every time he need to attach something he just reached in and used the first one he touched.  Every time.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/22/2020 at 12:53 PM, SloopJonB said:

If that was intended to be purple font you can ignore the following;

You are a severely disturbed person and should seek counselling before you stab yourself with a screwdriver.

Ever seen a piece of fine furniture put together with Phillips screws? Slotted heads were invented for a reason.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason was because they couldn't cut a different style screw head in those days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites