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Thought I'd start this to show a little history. Alan Gurney for a beginning point. The Wolverine, a 33 footer, Nepenthe, and WP.

The Wolverine design dates from about 1962. 

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The there is Bill Tripp (the Elder). Here is the old 57' Ondine from 1959, Columbia 50, and Mercer 44.

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Here are few designs from C&C; the old C&C. 

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And here are the 1969 Canada's Cup boats, Manitou and Niagara (from S&). These were published in the design section together, October 1969.Manitou is in the UK; Niagara has disappeared from history, last reported in Florida. These 2 boats were a leap in to the future with racing vs cruising features, but were very heavy vessels.

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And here are a couple from Charley Morgan, the 45 and custom 60' Maradea. The 45 is s striking looking boat, it is reported that about 12 were built by Morgan. He is still active, living near the Gulf Coast of Florida. And yes, he once bestowed a "God Bless You, Jeff" upon me as he did for Bob Perry. Although not at all religious, the way he stated it meant something deeper and I went away with a very appreciative feeling.

 

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Maradea.jpeg

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Are are a few from Bob Director, Salty Tiger (46'), Slaty Goose (54'), and an earlier boat Figaro IV (50'). All are very original in concept.

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And here is Gary Mull's Improbable, along with the first Dora

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The site stopped loading up images, so must wait until tomorrow. There are many more of these I have, and thought it would be interesting to post them. Hope there are a few yacht design history buffs out there!

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5 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Liked the wolverine, small alu...

Leo, you are in The Netherlands, where there seems to be a lot of interest in aluminum boats! Thanks, enjoy!

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If anyone would like more info, feel free to send questions. There is more than a single page on many of these designs.

Over next few weeks will be post many more. The files will be handed off to Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum later this year. They are building up a research library.

 

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 other Improbable pages:2

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And here is the 55' Dora from Mull:

Dora.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Crotalus46 said:

 other Improbable pages:2

Imprbbl4.jpeg

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Great story of Improbable's design evolution.

And who could forget Gary's, beautiful Chico 30 design?

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A couple of days ago, dug in to the files and scanned a few from German Frers and Scott Kaufmann. Frees produced some really elegant designs under IOR. Just as a historic note, German had a first cousin from Argentina named Ernesto Guevara, better known as Che. Yes, the revolutionary from Cuba.

Frers first:This 39 foster was from the early 1960s, and think it was Frers the elder, flooded by the 46 and 49 footers of the mid 1970s.

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Next is Scott Kaufmann's AJIII, which was a neat boat, saw it is Annapolis many years ago. It has since disappeared from any records.

AJIII.jpeg

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Here is a select from Britt Chance. First a 42 footer that he drew up, but was never informed if any were built. Then the famous Equation, at 68'). Britt would seek the most complicated systems for adjusting things; and constantly brought revisions while a boat was being built. In all honesty, I might have been one of the few people that got along with him, and can say that I was not always patient with some people.

Here they are:

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Chance:EQ.jpeg

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Thanks for the walk down memory lane, I was fortunate to sail on many of these.

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Bill Lapworth's Cal 40. These are still potent boats for racing or can be cruised without much change.

An attempt to load the Cal 48 did not work, so will try later. The 48 is a big sister, but not many were built. The Cal 40s production run went to around 200 boats.

Cal40.thumb.jpeg.72512fc9cdd3b36e6cf10d3dcbfe07c8.jpeg

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That's a pretty boat. Soon as we figure out why SA won't upload a .jpeg image, will be posting more.

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23 minutes ago, Crotalus46 said:

That's a pretty boat. Soon as we figure out why SA won't upload a .jpeg image, will be posting more.

open the image in paint then save as ......

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Trying to get some help with this from SA admin. This might take a while....

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Great thread but personally very scary.

I still have most of the mag's those came from. :wacko:

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Today, it's allowing the upload! Here is a really old one published in 1960. This little vessel became very well known, and fostered a number of sailors and designers.

Enjoy!

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That's kinda nice; agreed, some color is needed. But unless you have blueprints, can't furnish much.

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2 hours ago, Crotalus46 said:

That's kinda nice; agreed, some color is needed. But unless you have blueprints, can't furnish much.

See if this works

 

Screenshot_20200409-191304_Drive.jpg

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That's pretty nice! Looks like an original drawing from Ted Hood's shop. 

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On 2/24/2020 at 7:12 PM, Sailbydate said:

Great story of Improbable's design evolution.

And who could forget Gary's, beautiful Chico 30 design?

 

Improbable's older sister - Lively Lady  from 1966-7.  She set a new direction in boat design and with Allen's support of Mull changed yacht racing, facilitated lots of future great boat designers under his shingle and established a generation of yachtsman's careers. Built of finest mahogany and cedar, an incredible stainless and aluminum frame and a Boeing engineered keel she was light years ahead of her competitors.  In corrected time she dominated even Windward Passage in the most pivotal race of her career. If the rudder had not busted, she would have likely won the entire SORC series. Improbable and many other Mull boats had/has this boats DNA.  The best thing is she is nearly restored to original (rebuilding a palmer or may go electric to power her) and is actively sailed every week.

 

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Miss Gary from the IOR days and his foray into 6 metres.  Had some great times and his custom and production boats were innovative and fast.

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The famous S&S Running Tide. This is the Yachting magazine design section, dating from 1971. probably one of the best looking sailing vessels ever; nice sheer line, moderate overhangs (for the time), still very modern in appearance.

1969:yp copy.jpg

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On 4/24/2020 at 1:39 PM, Black Jack said:

 

 

Improbable's older sister - Lively Lady  from 1966-7.  She set a new direction in boat design and with Allen's support of Mull changed yacht racing, facilitated lots of future great boat designers under his shingle and established a generation of yachtsman's careers. Built of finest mahogany and cedar, an incredible stainless and aluminum frame and a Boeing engineered keel she was light years ahead of her competitors.  In corrected time she dominated even Windward Passage in the most pivotal race of her career. If the rudder had not busted, she would have likely won the entire SORC series. Improbable and many other Mull boats had/has this boats DNA.  The best thing is she is nearly restored to original (rebuilding a palmer or may go electric to power her) and is actively sailed every week.

 

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Passing Under my Lee.jpg

Here is an interesting clip from Warren Miller's Hot Yachts Cold Water where my boat Lively Lady tries to cover Hawkeye. Glad that Miller included it 

 

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OK, here is the C&C 61, including an ad, for a bit of color. The C&C 61 was probably a crowning design for C&C. Big, very fast, and given the big foretriangle, a bear to sail. The one here was named Sorcery, had a good race record, and was rolled over in the Pacific en route from Japan to the US. Made for an epic sea story.

Anyone looking for other designers? Post a request, there a many more.

Will be posting Charley Morgan's noted design Paper Tiger soon.

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Lydia, that is a neat boat! Is it yours?

Here is one of my favorites. It is not a sailboat; powered by some unknown type of fictional electric propulsion. Of course, if I could afford one of these, I'd have it powered with a small reactor, maybe surplus from USS Jimmy Carter.

 

The designer of this vessel is Harper Goff. He passed away many years ago, but if Disney ever does a re-make, they had better stick with the Steampunk Goth design theme.

Fun times....let's go sink a few warships.....just watch out for the giant squid.

Favorite boat.jpg

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SA allowed an upload this morning. Here is Chuck Burn's Topaz. I think Chuck worked at Gary Mull's office for a time.

The clipping came from Sail magazine. Does anyone know what became of this boat?

Topaz.jpg

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On 5/5/2020 at 11:54 AM, Crotalus46 said:

Lydia, that is a neat boat! Is it yours?

Here is one of my favorites. It is not a sailboat; powered by some unknown type of fictional electric propulsion. Of course, if I could afford one of these, I'd have it powered with a small reactor, maybe surplus from USS Jimmy Carter.

 

The designer of this vessel is Harper Goff. He passed away many years ago, but if Disney ever does a re-make, they had better stick with the Steampunk Goth design theme.

Fun times....let's go sink a few warships.....just watch out for the giant squid.

Favorite boat.jpg

Yep

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Love this thread and hope to keep it going.  Like SJB I have a library of these design clippings from about '68 thru '80.  Given the heavy C&C theme here, I thought I'd post one of my favorites, Bonaventure V, having logged over a thousand racing miles on her.  Anyone know her current status?  The drawings here show her initial configuration, and in spite of what the article says, the design was still pretty heavily CCA-influenced.  Sometime around '74, she came back into the shop for a new keel, a bum-tuck and some collagen injections for a more modern look.  

Bonaventure001.pdf

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would anybody know why they had those extremely swept-back-leading-edge keels & now not any more?

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Tradition, fashion and  hydrodynamics, Most of those boats were designed before there were the results of computers / hydrodynamic flow computation/ and testing. The designers were following on from long keeled boats, but with a fin, so a cutaway forward resulting in that swept back look.

More recently the results of all the tests and computations have shown better performance of a fin keel, with a more vertical look. IIRC the latest thinking  is for the leading edge for most cruising boats should be around 17 degrees of  sweep back and the aft end near vertical.

The faster the boat the more vertical the leading edge, hence very little sweep back if any on foilers.

Expect fashion following designers, to start adding all sorts of foils to boats that don't need it, like the fashion for winged keels a few years ago..

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I think that is a pretty good answer.  Computational Fluid Dynamics  were not available to designers in those days, and tank testing was/is very poor for evaluating keel performance because of the scale effects.  There was a whole generation of boats in the mid '70s that got shallow draft keels because tank testing suggested that the performance loss was less than the rating reduction (it wasn't).  There is another reason that keels are more vertical now and that is that if you want to maximize stability and minimize wetted surface, you will wind up with very little taper and very little sweep.  No surprise that Bonny's new keel was more upright.  The other change that was made was to a different foil section with a narrower drag bucket to gain some upwind performance at the expense of some speed on the reaches.  It seemed to work, but she was still pretty darned fast on a reach.

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Great Thread!

 

I have a C&C36R.

I think there are 2 hulls and both are sailing.

The boat is a absolutely a  blast t o sail, race and cruise.

Cheers

BobCandC36R_Picb_Portside.thumb.png.967033000c40a31f17d6e2687781eb41.png

 

 

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Wow! I was always curious about the 36R - never saw one in the flesh.  There was a half-hull model hanging in the design office and the standing joke was that there were more hull models around than actual boats.  I guess that was probably true and that the model was not a commercial success, but it looks like a neat boat though.  The business model at the time was to have a series of stock hulls that an owner could customize to a significant degree.  It seemed to work for the 43, 50 and 61, all of which have been featured above. I think the 36R was intended to extend that range downward a bit, but there didn't seem to be a lot of takers.  Since we are on the subject, the 50 was more or less replaced by the 48 which proved to be a bit of an embarrassment for the reason that I cited above - poor performance due to insufficient draft.  And, speaking of keels, Bonny wasn't the only "classic" C&C design to get a new keel, I did one for a 50 as well that was a cast iron carrier with a lead bulb (the owner owned an iron foundry).  I think it helped, but it's always hard to tell for sure.

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