Sign in to follow this  
lydia

Qld Night Race double MOB, one dead

Recommended Posts

Breaking news of a double MOB with one fatality in the very popular Kingfisher Bay night series in SE Qld.

Super experienced owner on a 44.7 it looks like.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's sad news...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such tragic news......thoughts are with families, crews and fellow sailors.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad...I'd hate to be the helmsmen , thinking he could have done something different...I've known two excellent mariners with MOB deaths  and it affected them greatly  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn.  Condolences to the family and friends of the deceased.  Fair winds ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Booms going boom, resulting in bad injury or death, must be the most common accident on sailing yachts.

I've said it before, but proper use of a preventer/kicking strap will prevent most accidents, but racing boats usually don't have time or inclination to bother.

RIP the victim, respect for his family, and mercy on the skipper/sailing master.

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Booms going boom, resulting in bad injury or death, must be the most common accident on sailing yachts.

I've said it before, but proper use of a preventer/kicking strap will prevent most accidents, but racing boats usually don't have time or inclination to bother.

RIP the victim, respect for his family, and mercy on the skipper/sailing master.

That's the big advantage to an old style tackle vang - a snap shackle on the base end lets you quickly move it to the rail to act as vang and preventer.

Saved my ass more than once when I accidentally got by the lee.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just read updated report in Courier M. sorry can’t download
One person hit ,other jumped in to save but could not keep hold in heavy seas .

one dead other with hypothermia. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That guy is an absolute hero!!!

So sorry he couldn't save his mate.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

That guy is an absolute hero!!!

So sorry he couldn't save his mate.

 

He is. Respect for trying!

I have been on races with fatal MOBs two or three times over the years. In all cases the MOB was injured in the process of going over. Something to think on: In a real MOB case you are likely going to be recovering someone who may not be able to climb back on the boat on their own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad news indeed.  

On 3/8/2020 at 2:26 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

He is. Respect for trying!

I have been on races with fatal MOBs two or three times over the years. In all cases the MOB was injured in the process of going over. Something to think on: In a real MOB case you are likely going to be recovering someone who may not be able to climb back on the boat on their own.

It is human nature to want to help others in an emergency situation.

Something to think about in any MOB scenario is the further risk of injury or loss of life when going over to help. 

Now instead of one crew in the water you have two.  Depending on the crew size, sea state, water temp, etc., this can create further problems and fatalities.  You have one less able bodied person on board to help in the recovery, and as KIS points out, getting a person back on board that is injured or unconscious isn't easy.  

It might seem callous not to jump in to assist but it usually isn't a good idea, even under ideal circumstances, i.e. calm seas, warm water, daylight, etc.  

One of the primary precepts in EMS is don't create more casualties than already exist, it makes for a far more complicated rescue, and it often doesn't end well.  It's a good policy.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Presuming enough crew, I would immediately assign someone to put a loop in a halyard to create a sling - then you could winch an unconscious (or weakened conscious) person back on board rather than trying to drag them over the side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sending a rescue swimmer in a HUGE *YMMV* situation. Best case, it is warm, there are plenty of competent crew, and the MOB is a small child or injured adult who absolutely needs help to survive and the person going in is trained in water rescue. Worst case is it is a cold, dark, and stormy night, the boat is shorthanded, and now you have a crew down 2 people to start with who may not find either one and the MOBs may never find each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Presuming enough crew, I would immediately assign someone to put a loop in a halyard to create a sling - then you could winch an unconscious (or weakened conscious) person back on board rather than trying to drag them over the side.

This is why we had 2 D rings fitted to our auto-inflate jackets, one in the chest area, the other at the nape of the neck. That one was for someone else to clip a line to if the MOB couldn't do it.

And the jackets were fitted with crotch straps so they didn't just slide up and over the head. All with the intent of recovering injured or unconscious people as easily as possible.

Most of us sail short-handed. There's no way my 58kg GF could hoist me aboard without mechanical advantage.

FKT

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Sad news indeed.  

It is human nature to want to help others in an emergency situation.

Something to think about in any MOB scenario is the further risk of injury or loss of life when going over to help. 

Now instead of one crew in the water you have two.  Depending on the crew size, sea state, water temp, etc., this can create further problems and fatalities.  You have one less able bodied person on board to help in the recovery, and as KIS points out, getting a person back on board that is injured or unconscious isn't easy.  

It might seem callous not to jump in to assist but it usually isn't a good idea, even under ideal circumstances, i.e. calm seas, warm water, daylight, etc.  

One of the primary precepts in EMS is don't create more casualties than already exist, it makes for a far more complicated rescue, and it often doesn't end well.  It's a good policy.

Reach, Throw, Row, GO.....Ancient Lifeguard rule...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/7/2020 at 5:47 PM, Fiji Bitter said:

Booms going boom, resulting in bad injury or death, must be the most common accident on sailing yachts.

I've said it before, but proper use of a preventer/kicking strap will prevent most accidents, but racing boats usually don't have time or inclination to bother.

RIP the victim, respect for his family, and mercy on the skipper/sailing master.

 

 

We keep one pre-rigged.  Seen too many accidents and Brenda and I are too old. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

There's no way my 58kg GF could hoist me aboard without mechanical advantage.

Is she named as the recipient of your life insurance policy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LB 15 said:

Is she named as the recipient of your life insurance policy?

It's all good - told her my first wife was still the beneficiary.

FKT

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/7/2020 at 6:47 PM, Fiji Bitter said:

Booms going boom, resulting in bad injury or death, must be the most common accident on sailing yachts.

I've said it before, but proper use of a preventer/kicking strap will prevent most accidents, but racing boats usually don't have time or inclination to bother.

RIP the victim, respect for his family, and mercy on the skipper/sailing master.

 

It was gusting to over 20 on Sundays Etchells OD Frostbite race.  I was in the middle working the traveller upwind and the guy down.  Got slightly whacked on the top of my head during one quick tack, and it sounded much worse than it was.   Left a small bump on the top of the head.  

Condolences to the crew and family of the deceased and injured!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this