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An older Polish couple invited my wife and I over for dinner when we were living in upstate NY. The wine we brought was politely set aside and instead the meal was accompanied with room temperature vodka served in water glasses. The vodka was homemade and came in plain unlabeled bottles. Each contained an added flavor such as a lemon rind, a hazelnut, but in particular one had a blade of “special” grass. All good. 

 

20 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

You can see a piece of the grass in the bottle, it has a nice flavor. 

 

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58 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I've found that Costco is extremely reliable with their house brands - is the vodka labelled Kirkland? (They can't sell liquor here).

I've never been disappointed with a Kirkland product. They obviously source their suppliers carefully.

Yes Kirkland. I’m pretty sure their Canadian whisky is Crown Royal. At pretty much the same price but for a 1750 ml bottle instead of 750. 

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On 5/17/2020 at 6:46 PM, SloopJonB said:

They are called SWMBO for a reason.

Many men never learn that simple fact. :D

Divorce was an easier option. :P 

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28 minutes ago, cyclone said:

 

An older Polish couple invited my wife and I over for dinner when we were living in upstate NY. The wine we brought was politely set aside and instead the meal was accompanied with room temperature vodka served in water glasses. The vodka was homemade and came in plain unlabeled bottles. Each contained an added flavor such as a lemon rind, a hazelnut, but in particular one had a blade of “special” grass. All good. 

 

 

Polish people like to make their own flavored vodkas.  Usually they start with 'spiritus' which is like Everclear.  Then they steep fruit, nuts, flowers, whatever and when it's been sufficiently infused, they water down to a little less volatility and bottle it.  I have had some really good ones.  

A Ukrainian couple we know go home now and then and bring back Ukrainian moonshine that's been aged in oak barrels, made by somebody in the family.  It has a mellow flavor and a beautiful golden color. They call it samogon which is Ukrainian for moonshine.  That shit is fantastic.

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59 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Bad vodka is about the worst alcohol there is followed by cheap brandy I think.

Polish vodka is pretty good and even the really expensive ones here are only about $25.00 a bottle.  Then there is the stuff that the guys in the park drink, a couple of bucks for a fifth.

I can't drink shots of it unless it's ice cold since any vodka tastes like alcohol, which to me tastes horrible.  Fortunately it's easy to hide the flavor.  Many people here mix it with coke!  (shudder)

I don't know if you've ever had Źubrówka.  It's named after the European bison, źubr is Polish for bison.  Apparently they like to eat this special grass that only grows in one part of Poland.  You can see a piece of the grass in the bottle, it has a nice flavor.  If you mix Źubrówka with apple juice it tastes just like mom's apple pie, in Polish they call the drink szarlotka which is Polish for apple pie.  Try it sometime if you like apple pie.

They make other kinds of Źubrówka, white, black, and some others.  The white is just normal vodka, I don't know what the others taste like, I've never tried them.

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There is also a Polish vodka that's aged in oak, it tastes better than normal vodka if you like oak.  It's called Dębowa because dęb is Polish for oak.

I just love this little coat to keep my vodka cold.  I got it years ago with a bottle of Źubrówka.

image.png.392a1e0919149392273401e30e428653.png

 

I think I have memories of drinking vodka with the Polish guys on contract in Germany....... I think? :wacko::P

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47 minutes ago, cyclone said:

An older Polish couple invited my wife and I over for dinner when we were living in upstate NY. The wine we brought was politely set aside and instead the meal was accompanied with room temperature vodka served in water glasses. The vodka was homemade and came in plain unlabeled bottles. Each contained an added flavor such as a lemon rind, a hazelnut, but in particular one had a blade of “special” grass. All good.

Here that is known as Moonshine, or just Shine. :D

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7 minutes ago, mad said:

I think I have memories of drinking vodka with the Polish guys on contract in Germany....... I think? :wacko::P

I had my first real vodka drinking experience at my first real Polish wedding.  It was in a small mountain village in the south part of Poland where my wife's family was from.  We weren't married yet.  Being an American, I was a bit of a celebrity in the village of about 800 people.

As is typical at these events, down each long table were pitchers of orange and apple juice as well as water.  In front of each place was a bottle of vodka and if it got emptied a new on would appear.  Platters of various kinds of food would appear about every hour.  Roast chicken, roast pork,gravy, potatoes, dumplings and on and on.

After midnight the party really gets started and in the little mountain villages, such as this one, they play games that can get rather risque.  I have a vague memory of this fine young Polish lady that nearly ended my newish relationship with the woman that eventually became my current wife. 

Everybody was on the dance floor in a big circle, boy, girl, boy girl, etc..  The newly wed couple was in the middle of the circle, each with a blanket.  They went around the inside of the circle as the band played.  When the music stopped the couple in the circle would throw their blanket down on the floor, grab the member of the opposite sex they were in front of, and throw them on the blanket.  As the 2 couples on the floor went at it, everybody would cheer and make off color remarks.  After a few moments, everybody would get up and the first couple would join the circle and the new couple would circle around with the music again.  This young lady stopped in front of me, threw down her blanket, shoved me on to it and jumped on top of me with a quite bit of enthusiasm and proceeded to writhe and grind all over me.  I wished I wasn't so drunk, I think I enjoyed it a lot. 

I also vaguely remember another game where a man was seated on a chair at either end of the dance floor with a fully inflated balloon in his lap.  A line of ladies formed in front of each man.  The ladies would run 20 or 30 feet toward the seated man and take a flying leap into his lap to try to break the balloon.  The lady would end up in the man's lap facing him, her arms draped over his neck, legs around his waist and they would grind their hips to try and break the balloon if it didn't break on the initial impact. Keep in mind, very, very few Polish ladies are overweight, and most of them are quite beautiful.  The groom was in one chair, and as the celebrity guest, I was in the other one.  As I fuzzily recollect, that was a fun game as well.

We finally made it to my wife's cousin's house, where we were staying, about 6 a.m. and then at noon we went back to the wedding hall for day 2 of the party.  Thankfully, because it was Sunday, the festivities ended about 3 a.m. on day 2.

Polish weddings require a strong liver, a healthy appetite, and a lot of stamina.  

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Here that is known as Moonshine, or just Shine. :D

good friend of mine from Walhalla, S.C., his dad was the only banker in town back in the 70's , the moonshiners would come over to his house and "gift" dad with their best moonshine, (got to keep the banker who holds your note happy)  my friend would grab a jar or two every so often and bring it to school... that shit was smoother than most over the counter stuff you could buy... it warmed you up fast...    as far as vodka goes, my wife insists on only rye vodka...   personally i go for Monopolowa  , always blended well and tastes good...   in dalas, the polish community makes their version of raki..   very high proof alcohol mixed with either honey or fruit,  i liked the raspberry , stuff was potent..

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21 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

I had my first real vodka drinking experience at my first real Polish wedding.  It was in a small mountain village in the south part of Poland where my wife's family was from.  We weren't married yet.  Being an American, I was a bit of a celebrity in the village of about 800 people.

As is typical at these events, down each long table were pitchers of orange and apple juice as well as water.  In front of each place was a bottle of vodka and if it got emptied a new on would appear.  Platters of various kinds of food would appear about every hour.  Roast chicken, roast pork,gravy, potatoes, dumplings and on and on.

After midnight the party really gets started and in the little mountain villages, such as this one, they play games that can get rather risque.  I have a vague memory of this fine young Polish lady that nearly ended my newish relationship with the woman that eventually became my current wife. 

Everybody was on the dance floor in a big circle, boy, girl, boy girl, etc..  The newly wed couple was in the middle of the circle, each with a blanket.  They went around the inside of the circle as the band played.  When the music stopped the couple in the circle would throw their blanket down on the floor, grab the member of the opposite sex they were in front of, and throw them on the blanket.  As the 2 couples on the floor went at it, everybody would cheer and make off color remarks.  After a few moments, everybody would get up and the first couple would join the circle and the new couple would circle around with the music again.  This young lady stopped in front of me, threw down her blanket, shoved me on to it and jumped on top of me with a quite bit of enthusiasm and proceeded to writhe and grind all over me.  I wished I wasn't so drunk, I think I enjoyed it a lot. 

I also vaguely remember another game where a man was seated on a chair at either end of the dance floor with a fully inflated balloon in his lap.  A line of ladies formed in front of each man.  The ladies would run 20 or 30 feet toward the seated man and take a flying leap into his lap to try to break the balloon.  The lady would end up in the man's lap facing him, her arms draped over his neck, legs around his waist and they would grind their hips to try and break the balloon if it didn't break on the initial impact. Keep in mind, very, very few Polish ladies are overweight, and most of them are quite beautiful.  The groom was in one chair, and as the celebrity guest, I was in the other one.  As I fuzzily recollect, that was a fun game as well.

We finally made it to my wife's cousin's house, where we were staying, about 6 a.m. and then at noon we went back to the wedding hall for day 2 of the party.  Thankfully, because it was Sunday, the festivities ended about 3 a.m. on day 2.

Polish weddings require a strong liver, a healthy appetite, and a lot of stamina.  

It wasn’t a wedding, just a normal monthly, weekend get together, starting on Friday evening and finishing around Sunday lunchtime.
Basically a meet-up of the Poles working in that area of Germany at the time, everyone was on a 6 month contract and nobody went home for breaks etc, so I think was just a way of getting together and relaxing.  
One other noticeable part was all the Germans leaving the crew house just before it started, leaving the token English guy there, with no warning of what was about to happen. There wasn’t a lot of love loss between them at the time anyway, thankfully the we all seemed to get on very well, especially as the vodka bottles rotated out of the freezer!   

The drinking till breakfast time, followed by making lunch sounds horribly familiar :lol:

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

good friend of mine from Walhalla, S.C., his dad was the only banker in town back in the 70's , the moonshiners would come over to his house and "gift" dad with their best moonshine, (got to keep the banker who holds your note happy)  my friend would grab a jar or two every so often and bring it to school... that shit was smoother than most over the counter stuff you could buy... it warmed you up fast...    as far as vodka goes, my wife insists on only rye vodka...   personally i go for Monopolowa  , always blended well and tastes good...   in dalas, the polish community makes their version of raki..   very high proof alcohol mixed with either honey or fruit,  i liked the raspberry , stuff was potent..

rye vodka?

I'm pretty sure that's called whisky

Vodka is spuds.

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37 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Vodka is spuds.

Titos is made withe corne.                                          :)

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15 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Titos is made withe corne.                                          :)

Never heard of it bit it sounds an awful lot like Bourbon.

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:
13 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Titos is made withe corne.                                          :)

Never heard of it bit it sounds an awful lot like Bourbon.

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Whearre halve oyu beene hidenge?                                                           :)

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20 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Titos is made withe corne.   

JFC Snaggs, with my eyes that looked like "Tito's is made with *come*".

Ew.

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15 minutes ago, bplipschitz said:

JFC Snaggs, with my eyes that looked like "Tito's is made with *come*".

Ew.

Sondes nastey!!                :) 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

rye vodka?

I'm pretty sure that's called whisky

Vodka is spuds.

It's alcohol.  People get all precious about their brands of white spirit, that's what 'Brands' plan to do, but it's just fucking alcohol.

Anyone who has ever ran a still understands that.

The only difference is what flavoring is chosen.

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3 minutes ago, astro said:

It's alcohol.  People get all precious about their brands of white spirit, that's what 'Brands' plan to do, but it's just fucking alcohol.

Anyone who has ever ran a still understands that.

The only difference is what flavoring is chosen.

I have done some research in this field.  I'd like to publish it but I lost the papers.  It happens.

Research has disclosed that all the many varieties of alcohol have molecules individual to the kind.

My research is still ongoing.

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2 minutes ago, hasher said:

I have done some research in this field.  I'd like to publish it but I lost the papers.  It happens.

Research has disclosed that all the many varieties of alcohol have molecules individual to the kind.

My research is still ongoing.

Really interested in any evidence you have of different types of Ethyl Alcohol molecules.  You will find that there is only one.  Everything else are impurities, accidental or deliberate.

Oh and  the label, that's really important!!!!  Must project the right image to my friends!!!!

image.png.d63053150148bd51171c2477fc0710ef.png

tumblr_inline_mqcr3b9enm1qz4rgp.gif

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11 hours ago, hasher said:

https://www.britannica.com/science/alcohol/Physical-properties-of-alcohols

I have a tie. It is one of my favorites.  Buying that tie included a donation to mothers against drunk driving.  I believe my tie is a beautiful view of amaretto.

That's a nice article on the different types of alcohol but as @astro said, ethanol is ethanol.  If it has different molecules, it isn't ethanol anymore.

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Every culture has their drug of choice.  Europeans traditionally use alcohol.

Some are distilled directly like potatoes others indirectly such as Italian wine distillation.  Grapes to spirits.

Many are very high percentage alcohol, not the 40% shit we think are strong.  I got stopped in my tracks once by Italian Grappa.  The one in question was aniseed flavoured.  Knocked it back disrespectfully and found it difficult to breath for a little while.

I make my own beer and prefer it to the 'dead' tasting factor stuff.

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Alcohol is fuel.

Fuel for what, you can decide.

If you can run a dragster on it, or cook with that horrible stove on the boat, I wouldn't drink it...  But have at it and enjoy!

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21 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

rye vodka?

I'm pretty sure that's called whisky

Vodka is spuds.

rye is a grain with which you can make a wort to make alcohol which can be distilled...  all you need is a starch that can be converted..

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20 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

c6da464d1930df1d131e44831eb0edb6_large.p

Whearre halve oyu beene hidenge?                                                           :)

tito's a product of austin...   i have a large bottle in the cabinet..

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Got the star 45 done last week and had sea trials today.  Spent about 90 minutes sailing.   It was the first time our club has gotten together in over 2 months.

Need to work on some sail trim,  but just wanted to make sure the the darn thing sailed straight more than anything.  

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E627DB19-BE4F-4BCA-B6C0-519B6F2508B1.jpeg

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On 5/21/2020 at 12:46 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

tito's a product of austin...   i have a large bottle in the cabinet..

What's it doing in the cabinet?

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1 hour ago, Jules said:
On 5/21/2020 at 11:46 AM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

tito's a product of austin...   i have a large bottle in the cabinet..

What's it doing in the cabinet? 

The *important* questions!

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2 hours ago, Jules said:

What's it doing in the cabinet?

cause that's where all the liquors hide out..   i'm a homebrewer and have been drinking that instead of the hard stuff....

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On 5/15/2020 at 9:50 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i haven't been making any songs or silly videos.. but i did get some potatoes going

 

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1a2bdf925252c41f5bc3dbd814b2aef6.jpg

 

potatoe update... going strong..

 

SAM_0292c.JPG

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We've had a few washouts on the steep parts of the driveway during the major cloudbursts this year. I got tired of shoveling gravel and sand only to have it wind up at the bottom or in the ditch so finally sucked it up, rented a skid steer and a plate compactor and had 32 yds of gravel delivered yesterday. The equipment rented for 24 hours and I really had to get the job done in one day so was up at the ungodly hour of 6:30 this AM running the compactor. Fortunately the weather was perfect, sunny, low sixties and breezy.

enhance

enhance

enhance

Because ski season is just around the corner

enhance

I'm thinking happy hour in the hot tub this afternoon.

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A friend had a similar problem with his drive,  trouble was when the driveway washed down, it closed a major road ( A90 south of Aberdeen).  He eventually solved it.. He moved house.. 

 

Just prior to that in a previous job,  another friend  married an Irish girl,  every time he came back he had several bottles of Potcheen ( Poitin)  . Apart from having lethal ABV,  some were wonderful, some were painted stripper. Being true west coast Potcheen theirs was mostly potato based.. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poitín

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6 hours ago, Willin' said:

We've had a few washouts on the steep parts of the driveway during the major cloudbursts this year. I got tired of shoveling gravel and sand only to have it wind up at the bottom or in the ditch so finally sucked it up, rented a skid steer and a plate compactor and had 32 yds of gravel delivered yesterday. The equipment rented for 24 hours and I really had to get the job done in one day so was up at the ungodly hour of 6:30 this AM running the compactor. Fortunately the weather was perfect, sunny, low sixties and breezy.

 

Sand ?  i'd think you'd want to use decomposed granite...  doesn't wash away as much..

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

Sand ?  i'd think you'd want to use decomposed granite...  doesn't wash away as much..

Oddly, there's plenty of granite hereabouts, but no DG. I just used salted sand from the town sand shed (because it's free) and some crushed gravel from a neighbor who had a pile leftover from a job, but it obviously wasn't very well mixed and compacted.

The  32 yds were really nice 3/4" crushed gravel from a local quarry. Hopefully, if I crowned the driveway properly, it'll be the last time I do this job.

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Starting a couple of end tables, one of them in a wedge shape to fit between the love seat and a recliner that's at an angle to the love seat.  I'm using flamewood - aka copperpod ( Peltophorum )  I bought a couple slabs in impulse about a year ago.

To flatten the wedge, I had to take about an 1/8" off the first side due to a bad gouge from skip planing.

TriTbl_002.jpg.0505074b043f1ff47ff42dcdced4e170.jpg

Sure adds up to a lot of chips and dust.  This is what the DC didn't pick up

TriTbl_003.jpg.e33a12e73b53a422475a6258ce550531.jpg

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3 hours ago, Jules said:

Starting a couple of end tables, one of them in a wedge shape to fit between the love seat and a recliner that's at an angle to the love seat.  I'm using flamewood - aka copperpod ( Peltophorum )  I bought a couple slabs in impulse about a year ago.

To flatten the wedge, I had to take about an 1/8" off the first side due to a bad gouge from skip planing.

TriTbl_002.jpg.0505074b043f1ff47ff42dcdced4e170.jpg

 

 

nice router jig..  the quick one i built for my rudder project wasn't quite as nice..

Quote

salted sand

i guess not much is going to grow alongside of the driveway for awhile..    no DG?  I'm surprised if they have the quaries around , would be a good way to get rid of waste...  you can get it mixed with a "binder" so it's a pretty firm surface,  the only disadvantage is you can pick up little rocks on the bottom of the shoes, have to be careful with wood floors..

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22 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

nice router jig..  the quick one i built for my rudder project wasn't quite as nice..

It's kind of cumbersome.  I modeled it on one I saw Nick Offerman use in his shop and then made modifications that it turned out didn't need to be made.  What I should have focused on is keeping the dust down.  Yesterday I looked like Pig Pen after he rolled in a pile of sawdust.  The dust collector picks up some of the fine dust but most escapes off to the sides.

But the flattening part is done now.  And now it's saving as much of this pricey wood as I can.  Epoxy time...

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The one on the right will be trimmed once the epoxy dries.  Then I round all the corners like on the wedge.  The slats at the end of the table are for side trim, nautical style.

TriTbl_004.jpg.d61953a1fb5f3d40ef1ba887858433f1.jpg

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That table is going to look very 1958.

image.thumb.png.8939f7acf5370e6d5e4efdf8b0da0987.png

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9 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

That table is going to look very 1958.

image.thumb.png.8939f7acf5370e6d5e4efdf8b0da0987.png

Belongs in the Jetson's house! Nice.

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On 6/20/2020 at 1:55 PM, SloopJonB said:

That table is going to look very 1958.

The plan is more nautical-like, with edging like you'd see on a galley countertop.

But first I had to build a steam box because I threw the other one away.  I think the edging strips are sapele but could be African mahogany.  Whatever the case, after 45 minutes in the steam box it came out almost dry.  Hope it maintains the curvature.

TriTbl_006.jpg.76760df45039f3145a47e77481ef44b1.jpg

TriTbl_007.jpg.9e81521e114451b3f3e5b3e231118fe1.jpg

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Don't bother "building" a steam box - use plastic pipe of large enough diameter with screw on caps.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Don't bother "building" a steam box - use plastic pipe of large enough diameter with screw on caps.

Been there, done that.  That was my first shot at a steam box.  The pipe (Sch 40) sagged from the heat.

The wood is AM.  And it springs back like nothing I've ever steamed.  Yesterday I steamed the piece for 30 minutes and clamped it overnight.  It sprung back about 50%.  So I ran it again today.  Put the curved piece in the steam box and left it for 45 minutes.  When I took it out, it was straight.  Clamped it up again  this morning.  Just took off the clamps - same spring back.

TriTbl_008.jpg.163d9eb5bdd37a00285f765cd26e2b4a.jpg

I planned to glue it on but I doubt glue would hold.  The wood is a little under 3/8" thick.  Screws and bungs are iffy.  I was thinking drive in maple dowels, split the ends and hammer in AM wedges.  Not sure how that would hold though.

I've got enough American walnut or sipo mahogany (African) in the shop.  I've also got enough Brazilian walnut but it's pecky.  Gotta do some thinking...

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2 hours ago, Jules said:

Been there, done that.  That was my first shot at a steam box.  The pipe (Sch 40) sagged from the heat.

The wood is AM.  And it springs back like nothing I've ever steamed.  Yesterday I steamed the piece for 30 minutes and clamped it overnight.  It sprung back about 50%.  So I ran it again today.  Put the curved piece in the steam box and left it for 45 minutes.  When I took it out, it was straight.  Clamped it up again  this morning.  Just took off the clamps - same spring back.

TriTbl_008.jpg.163d9eb5bdd37a00285f765cd26e2b4a.jpg

I planned to glue it on but I doubt glue would hold.  The wood is a little under 3/8" thick.  Screws and bungs are iffy.  I was thinking drive in maple dowels, split the ends and hammer in AM wedges.  Not sure how that would hold though.

I've got enough American walnut or sipo mahogany (African) in the shop.  I've also got enough Brazilian walnut but it's pecky.  Gotta do some thinking...

You could build up a curved laminate.

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2 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Howe thick is piece you bendeng?

A little less than 3/8".  I've bent 3/4" easier than this. 

2 hours ago, FoolOnTheHill said:

You could build up a curved laminate.

I looked at the slabs I had on hand and noticed the walnut had grain curvature close to that AM piece I bent.  I've never done the Leo Sampson thing but what the hell?  Why not try?  So I took the AM bent piece and traced it over the walnut slab, closely following the grain.  Then on to the bandsaw...  The walnut slab was about 36"x15"x10/4 when I started.

This is what's left after I resawed the other straight pieces

TriTbl_010.jpg.5032076733fff6177537b995769c803b.jpg

But the grain following piece came pretty close to the bent AM piece

TriTbl_009.jpg.5a67ebc74e8ab2c481718e88a7e2e13f.jpg

This is before steam bending.  So maybe this will shape better then the AM.  Never bent walnut before but I thing I remember reading it's pretty cooperative.  First I have to plane/scrape/sand the saw marks off the inside.  A compass plane would be nice.

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2 hours ago, FoolOnTheHill said:

You could build up a curved laminate.

Adgreede, x = numbere of laminattes, 1/x = amounte of springe backe.                                                           :)

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12 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

 

Adgreede, x = numbere of laminattes, 1/x = amounte of springe backe.                                                           :)

I thought about laminates but didn't want that one side to look different than the other 7 sides.

Today will be the experiment with bending walnut.  Fingers crossed.

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1 minute ago, Jules said:

Today will be the experiment with bending walnut. 

W bendes fine..........          :)

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On 6/20/2020 at 12:30 PM, Jules said:

It's kind of cumbersome.  I modeled it on one I saw Nick Offerman use in his shop and then made modifications that it turned out didn't need to be made.  What I should have focused on is keeping the dust down.  Yesterday I looked like Pig Pen after he rolled in a pile of sawdust.  The dust collector picks up some of the fine dust but most escapes off to the sides.

But the flattening part is done now.  And now it's saving as much of this pricey wood as I can.  Epoxy time...

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The one on the right will be trimmed once the epoxy dries.  Then I round all the corners like on the wedge.  The slats at the end of the table are for side trim, nautical style.

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Question for you woodworking artists, since I just went through a table top refinish myself.  Any advice on getting epoxy to level?  I know it really doesn't level like varnish or paint.

My process was to put a layer of epoxy down, sand down the high points, put another layer of epoxy down, sand down to as flat/even as I could get it, then on to the varnish.  Is there a better approach than this?

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33 minutes ago, bplipschitz said:

Question for you woodworking artists, since I just went through a table top refinish myself.  Any advice on getting epoxy to level?  I know it really doesn't level like varnish or paint.

My process was to put a layer of epoxy down, sand down the high points, put another layer of epoxy down, sand down to as flat/even as I could get it, then on to the varnish.  Is there a better approach than this?

Very thin layers.  Use a roller if you can.  You'll go through a lot of brushes or rollers but flattening it won't be such a chore.

I took a belt sander to the epoxy in this project because I wanted to take it down to bare wood, leaving the epoxy in only the voids.  A 6" RO sander barely made a dent in the epoxy.

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Got the walnut clamped up now.  It was MUCH easier to bend than the AM. 

Now I have to figure out how I'm going to do the legs, the drawers and the bottom shelves...

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43 minutes ago, Jules said:

Very thin layers.  Use a roller if you can.  You'll go through a lot of brushes or rollers but flattening it won't be such a chore.

I took a belt sander to the epoxy in this project because I wanted to take it down to bare wood, leaving the epoxy in only the voids.  A 6" RO sander barely made a dent in the epoxy.

Super -- thanks.  I tried to get the layers as thin as I could with brushes, but a roller might have been better.  Does thinning with acetone help?  My experience with that is that it seems to compromise the integrity of the epoxy, making it less stiff.

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The Gougeon's had a process they called Flow-Coat or Flo-Coat for that very thing.

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3 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

Super -- thanks.  I tried to get the layers as thin as I could with brushes, but a roller might have been better.  Does thinning with acetone help?  My experience with that is that it seems to compromise the integrity of the epoxy, making it less stiff.

If you go with a roller and lay it on thinly, you shouldn't need any kind of thinner.  But you could check on Sloop's suggestion.  West Systems has a lot of videos and, while long, they are very detailed.  There is one that is specifically for laying down coats of epoxy.

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21 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

Question for you woodworking artists, since I just went through a table top refinish myself.  Any advice on getting epoxy to level?  I know it really doesn't level like varnish or paint.

My process was to put a layer of epoxy down, sand down the high points, put another layer of epoxy down, sand down to as flat/even as I could get it, then on to the varnish.  Is there a better approach than this?

Cabinet scraper to get flat after sealing wood then heat gun the final coat.

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I know better.  I really do (I keep telling myself).  But I did it anyway.

Wood shrinks and swells the most perpendicular to the way the grain runs.  The wider the board, the more movement.  So if you're making a wide table and want breadboard ends, you have to allow for movement.

After working all day getting the curve in the table top to match the bent walnut, I glued it up perpendicular to the grain.  Then the above hit me. 

Wonder how long that strip of walnut is going to last.

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Over the weekend I made a 48" Roubo frame saw, meant for resawing wide boards.  My bandsaw only goes to 10" and I have a couple much wider pieces I need to resaw.  I fear this thing may be the death of me.  I have no idea how I'm going to hold the wood while I saw.

RFS_01.jpg.7e8ae819e1446d5066f8c860670fb2f9.jpg

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32 minutes ago, Jules said:

Over the weekend I made a 48" Roubo frame saw, meant for resawing wide boards.  My bandsaw only goes to 10" and I have a couple much wider pieces I need to resaw.  I fear this thing may be the death of me.  I have no idea how I'm going to hold the wood while I saw.

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:)

 

 

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On 6/29/2020 at 1:31 PM, Jules said:

I have no idea how I'm going to hold the wood while I saw.

With your feet, obviously.  That reminds me of my grandfather's ice saw, used for cutting the ice out of the pond, since he was an ice man.  There's a career you don't hear much about anymore. . .

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On 6/29/2020 at 1:31 PM, Jules said:

Over the weekend I made a 48" Roubo frame saw, meant for resawing wide boards.  My bandsaw only goes to 10" and I have a couple much wider pieces I need to resaw.  I fear this thing may be the death of me.  I have no idea how I'm going to hold the wood while I saw.

RFS_01.jpg.7e8ae819e1446d5066f8c860670fb2f9.jpg

i'd like to know where the hell did you find the blade?   and they make these tools called sabre and circular saws...

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11 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i'd like to know where the hell did you find the blade?   and they make these tools called sabre and circular saws...

Blackburn tools.  And they don't make sabre saw or circular saw blades big enough to resaw something 3' wide.

I've got a pruning blade for my sawzall that can go about 12" deep.  I used that to resaw some spalted sycamore that was 18" wide.  What a mess that was. 

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35 minutes ago, Jules said:

Blackburn tools.  And they don't make sabre saw or circular saw blades big enough to resaw something 3' wide.

I've got a pruning blade for my sawzall that can go about 12" deep.  I used that to resaw some spalted sycamore that was 18" wide.  What a mess that was. 

I'm just in awe.  That's all.

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Built a front bumper, rear bumper and spare tire carrier kit for a 4Runner. Broke in my brand spanking new Miller welder on this project. Got a couple hours of grinding in my immediate future.RIMG0194-X2.jpg

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Got a little warm working in the sun.

RIMG0195-X2.jpg

 

Ready for powder coat, or however he decides to finish it.

RIMG0196-X2.jpg

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Just now, bmiller said:

Got a little warm working in the sun.

RIMG0195-X2.jpg

 

Ready for powder coat, or however he decides to finish it.

RIMG0196-X2.jpg

How did you cut the plate ?

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 Finished my initial attempt to negotiate the riprap and the eleven foot tides. My hope is that the wheelbarrow boat will be easier to use than the plastic Old Town square stern canoe I’ve been dragging across the rocks for twenty five years.

659929B6-0AA1-4228-9D0A-382B923C4E10.thumb.jpeg.4e71368904482b13d63a0a1d43d46c7f.jpeg0F13BE79-ED73-4A6E-A68B-495CE9D43437.thumb.jpeg.5d4f0eb8ad527a241299d891b698f994.jpeg 

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Binnacle cover - After weeks of messing with the templates to get everything right, I started on making up the pieces (all cut with a hot knife).

Binn_02.jpg.847d0ec70a82c38bbae3fb85d71e2790.jpg

Yesterday I sewed on the zipper to one half.  That went pretty well.  Then I did the second half and first time put the material on the wrong side of the zipper.  Second attempt ended up with the end being an inch short of the other (didn't have the material tensioned right.)  It's a little hard sewing with this setup:

Binn_03.jpg.d368e2cc0ada04f6f36c6855e6998cea.jpg

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This is NOT fun!  I'd rather be bending pipe or making dust.

I finally got the two zippered halves sewn right.
Binn_04.jpg.b8da6d12ce51636ea72a7be0f4c037b9.jpg

Now I have to sew the wheel section to the that.  I need a drink!
Binn_05.jpg.26291753034a3f36d9340ca8119bea22.jpg

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