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Hawaiidart

Filler for lead-wood joint

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Back in the '30's, while in HS, my father built a scale model wooden sloop.  It looks somewhat like a J Boat, with long overhangs.  It was originally rigged to sail itself in circles.  I am trying to restore it and have a question.  The keel sump is wood, with a lead fin shaped shoe attached.  I need to fill the joint and fair but am unsure what to use.  Any ideas?

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A bit of epoxy with micro balloons is easy to sand, if you have those things lying around. After that, a small can of bondo would work and be inexpensive. You could also use any epoxy adhesive mixed with talc. Add talc until the mixture is like fluffy peanut butter and doesn't run. 

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Thanks- I wondered about the bondo.  Amazingly, the auto parts store is considered essential and still open, too.

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Bondo used to absorb water...don't know if it still does.  But as this is a model and will not "live" in the water, not sure its really an issue as long as you've got some paint over it.

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Bondo is mainly polyester resin with filler.  Yes, absorbs water, but slowly.

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Bondo can absorb moisture if it's left bare or only primered.

If you paint it, it will be fine - if it wasn't it wouldn't last on cars. Modern fillers ain't your fathers Bondo.

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4 hours ago, Crash said:

Bondo used to absorb water...don't know if it still does.  But as this is a model and will not "live" in the water, not sure its really an issue as long as you've got some paint over it.

This used to be a functioning model sailboat.  For the past 50 years it has lived on the shelf.  It won't see any water again; it's too meaningful to me. Once the keel is filled and faired, it will get painted, and the hull and topsides varnished.  Then it goes back on the shelf.

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Painters putty, should be able to find and oil based paint.  Once you go down the two part goo road no turning back. If you are anywhere around a woodboat yard and can steal a tiny bit of dolfinite use that for the keel.  

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honestly,  for a boat that is only going to see shelf service,  and if you are going to paint it,  drywall mud.  I have refurbed a fewr boats like yours  for display I went the extra step of removing the lead keel and making one out of wood.  Made for easier display.  Ie less weight to worry about on the shelf.

Show us some pics...  Im working on a plank on frame build of a star 45...

a12999637-73-8F2A2F55-64C6-4B51-B913-904a13026099-217-DBD08496-7511-413E-9EF4-43

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I'll try to post something.  Mine has much less- well, everything.  It was a HS wood shop project my dad completed in the '30s.  Nice kegerator by the way!

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IMG_2401.JPG.7ae3bd0e6acb1f611c7d45017acfcdf7.JPG

Here it is, sideways. I have no idea how it ended up that way or what to do about it.  Any, you can see that I'm not really restoring it as much as re-doing the paint and varnish.  The mast on the left is broken above the spreaders. You are seeing both sections plus the boom.  The flag staffs are for our trawlerl.  Sometime in the 60's, when I was a kid, I convinced my dad that it needed a cabin house, which he epoxied on the deck. I thought about removing it but then decided that (a) I could really mess up the deck and (b) he did it for me even though he probably didn't want to.  I'll leave it.  I made the stand in the 80s and it needs new cross supports once I can get some oak pieces.

IMG_2401.JPG

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Cool boat.  And a great backstory.  Would be really cool to make it seaworthy again and do some freesailing with it.   That would lead me down the road of epoxy and filler.  Provide of course that the keel is still very firmly attached

 

 

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Yeah, it would be fun to put it in a pond where I can fetch it if it goes down. You're right: the keel-stump joint looks suspect. To me, the hull also looks hogged, though it was shaped by hand so that might be how it was originally.  It's too much of a keepsake to risk.  When I shipped it here to Anacortes from our home in Hawaii, UPS asked me how much insurance I wanted to take out.  I told them it's has no value except to me. No money could replace it.  Anyway, it's not fine craftsmanship but it was made by a kid.  A kid who a few short years later would find himself part of the combat engineers in Patton's Third Army.

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