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Rushman

Work Bench for the Man Cave....

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After seeing the work spaces that others have, along with a little bit of spare time, I think it might be time to build a work bench for the man cave.

Nothing too big, the area I have is about 10 feet/3m wide along one side of a double garage

Movable would be nice, something about working outside appeals to me

Special features that make life easier

Easy to build, “rough as guts” is about the standard of my skills/tools

Links to websites that might be useful

Thanks in advance

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5 minutes ago, Rushman said:

After seeing the work spaces that others have, along with a little bit of spare time, I think it might be time to build a work bench for the man cave.

Nothing too big, the area I have is about 10 feet/3m wide along one side of a double garage

Movable would be nice, something about working outside appeals to me

Special features that make life easier

Easy to build, “rough as guts” is about the standard of my skills/tools

Links to websites that might be useful

Thanks in advance

Movable 

wheels on inside end of the two legs 

legs only on the outside end of bench

wheels don’t even have to rotate, probably more stable if they don’t
I would use 4x4 for legs and 3/4 plywood for top ... the rest is up to you 

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I built one may be 20 years ago.  The top is S4S  2"x4" douglas fir. I had a nice flat concrete floor and a bunch of bar clamps, and a couple bottles of titebond glue later I had a top. A couple bags of sand kept it all down on the concrete.

I used 4x4s for legs, just brackets at the top, and about 4" up from the ground I glued/bolted 2x12s as stringers, and a plywood shelf glued to the tops of the 2x12s.  I bought an after market wood vise as well.

Over the years I've had to hit the top with the belt sander a few times, and it's a little out of square now, if I cared, I could flatten with a router on rails. I've also bolted a jointer on one end. 

It's heavy, but movable. Heavy keeps it from moving when I hand plane something on it's surface.  I've thought about enclosing the legs as the shelf gets a little busy with all sorts of resins and paints, but haven't gotten around to it.

 

It's no maple top beauty, but it's 20 years old and will go another 20 for sure.

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I would do a strong built in place inside and use a couple saw horses with half a sheet of something outside.

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I was given a Simpson Strong Tie workbench kit some years ago.  This includes all the metal brackets and fasteners you will need, plus full instructions.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-Workbench-or-Shelving-Hardware-Kit-WBSK/205177374

I made a fine workbench  using a 8'x4' sheet of 3/4" ply cut in half lengthways.  This made a 2' wide top and a shelf about 1 foot off the ground, with corner notches cut into it for the legs.  Legs and shelf supports were all 2x4.  I screwed the top and shelf down to the 2x4s with flat-head deck screws.

I also attached a length of 1x8 along the back of the top and the shelf to stop things rolling off the back, and bolted a big bench vise to one corner.  Wheels on one end, 1/16" clear of the floor, and a handle on the other.  Tilt up a few inches, and away you go.

Magnificent piece of work, if I say so.  Took me 3 hours, most of which was spent charging the old weak battery in my drill.  I'll try to find pix.

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18 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

I was given a Simpson Strong Tie workbench kit some years ago.  This includes all the metal brackets and fasteners you will need.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-Workbench-or-Shelving-Hardware-Kit-WBSK/205177374

I made a fine workbench  using a 8'x4' sheet of 3/4" ply cut in half lengthways.  This made a 2' wide top and a shelf about 1 foot off the ground, with corner notches cut into it for the legs..  Legs and shelf supports were all 2x4.  I screwed the top and shelf down to the 2x4s with flat-head deck screws.

I also attached a length of 1x8 along the back of the top and the shelf to stop things rolling off the back, and bloted a big bench vise to one corner.  Wheels on one end, 1/16" clear of the floor, and a handle on the other.  Tilt up a few inches, and away you go.

Magnificent piece of work, if I say so.  Took me 3 hours, most of which was spent charging the old weak battery in my drill.  I'll try to find pix.

I have 4 just like that I made myself 30 years ago, with the bottom shelves, don’t know if it was necessary but in the upper corners I have 12” 45 degree braces... the 2 wheel lift and go is great in many ways, OP said he liked working outdoors which is always nice and it lets you clean under the bench area  before rolling back in where it lives most of the time. Mine are in a two car car below an apartment in the back of our property, 2 benches along the two walls, I’ve never used the space as a garage in 38 years. 

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50 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Over the years I've had to hit the top with the belt sander a few times, and it's a little out of square now, if I cared, I could flatten with a router on rails. I've also bolted a jointer on one end. 

Cover it with 3/4" MDF and round over the edges.

I had a built in bench much like yours that came with my first house. Rather than spend the time trying to level up the plank top I just screwed down the MDF - best workbench I ever had. When the MDF gets too ragged, unscrew it and put new down.

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48 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Cover it with 3/4" MDF and round over the edges.

I had a built in bench much like yours that came with my first house. Rather than spend the time trying to level up the plank top I just screwed down the MDF - best workbench I ever had. When the MDF gets too ragged, unscrew it and put new down.

I've considered it, and my side cabinets have a sacrificial ply top than can be swapped out, but I like the basic nature of this one. I can live with it's little imperfections, as I put most of them there. (all except for the time the wife was cutting holes in canvas for snaps, without putting down a sacrificial piece of ply. There's an area of the top that looks like it had chickenpox)

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I'd never use ply for that - MDF is way better and way cheaper.

Cheaper, heavier, flatter, smoother, doesn't splinter.

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One idea you might consider is a pivoting shelf in addition to your planned bench.  I built one on a 2 x  12 box mounted to the wall with a couple heavy duty barn door hinges, a swivel wheel supporting the free end.    It folds against the wall to occupy 12 inches space, or swings out as a peninsula when I needed the band saw mounted on it.   As long as the floor is flat it works great, with storage below.   I liked it enough to drag it to the next state.   The old shop was a double garage designed around model T sized cars and a couple feet extra in front where a wood stove sat when it was used as an apartment for a war bride.     The building was so small one car had to be backed in to open its door.   With space that tight I had to be creative so I could get two cars in during a snow.       

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Since permanent work benches tend to attract clutter, I get more use out of moveable surfaces. I have a set of 8’ by 18” melamine and 2x4 benches that get set up on saw horses as needed either side by side or end to end. A more elegant approach is Manning benches. Check The Workbench Book by Scott Landis.

https://www.offcenterharbor.com/videos/cool-shop-tips-part-1-manning-benches/

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Solid core fire rated wood doors make for a nice flat heavy work surface. The problem I would have with a movable bench would be that you’d have to have some way to stop it from moving around while you are using it.  Maybe only have wheels on one side. So you can move it around like a wheel barrow or some type of screw jack to retract the wheels or locking wheels...

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When I bought my first (and so far only) house ten years ago I signed on the dotted line, did the walk-through, and it was mine.  Dad was there, he says "So where do you want to start?"  I said "Let's build a workbench in the garage."  He was so happy I thought he was gonna cry!  Talk about a moment....  We had a ball.  And built a nice solid bench. I hadn't even moved in yet.   I think of that moment every time I use it, which is pretty much daily.

Anyway plenty of plans online-  pick a set that will be a bit more beefy than you think you need, and build the biggest one you can fit into your space.  Keep us all posted!

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This is what to do with fixed wheels at one end.  Sorry about the crappy MS Word drawing.

 

workbench_wheels.jpg

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25 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:

Solid core fire rated wood doors make for a nice flat heavy work surface. The problem I would have with a movable bench would be that you’d have to have some way to stop it from moving around while you are using it.  Maybe only have wheels on one side. So you can move it around like a wheel barrow or some type of screw jack to retract the wheels or locking wheels...

I have used doors many times. A set of fold up legs work great. Stand it up out of the way when not in use. You can pick up a used door for next to nothing.

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15851882075027641629524824707946.thumb.jpg.a60c2d54b74b79e9e54e16a3b9dc941d.jpg A pair of sawhorses is your friend. Inside , outside. These are getting new 36 inch legs this week.  Build them 18 - 24 wide so they are workbench width. They live in the garage but go out in driveway for sanding, routing and other dusty work. Short and long peices of plywood make a work surface, place 2x4s under the long plywood for support.

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I have taken a couple of photos of the existing mess, will post once the cloud transfers them to the iPad.

Lots of things to think about

Two things were in the garage when we moved in... a 6 foot workbench which is solid and a set of 4x5 drawers also 6 foot wide.  Perhaps I can utilise these with some minor adjustments...

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44 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

This is what to do with fixed wheels at one end.  Sorry about the crappy MS Word drawing.

 

workbench_wheels.jpg

That looks far easier then how I had imagined it. Thanks

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3 minutes ago, Rushman said:

That look far easier then how I had imagined it. Thanks

Make sure the wheels are on the outside!  You also might want to round off the back corners of those two legs to stop them scraping the floor and splintering.  And the handle the other end, a stout piece of 1½" dowel is also useful for hanging your cleaning cloths.

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15851894302544202331287721457302.thumb.jpg.5c22948ad051ab7f681795ccdb23fb11.jpg

A heavyduty shelf unit makes a good hobby surface. These from Menards  are 4 or 8 feet loong and 18 inches deep. The 3/4 particle shelf surface is adequate but easy to change.

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4 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Make sure the wheels are on the outside!  You also might want to round off the back corners of those two legs to stop them scraping the floor and splintering.  And the handle the other end, a stout piece of 1½" dowel is also useful for hanging your cleaning cloths.

Outside... dare I ask how you know this :lol:

Great tip on the back corners.

Do the wheels need to be so high above the floor? The closer they, the less you need to lift the other end

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1. It seems obvious, but I did see someone do it 100% wrong.  He wondered why it wasn't working, then gave himself a bit of flat-head syndrome.

2. Radiusing the aft corners really helps.

3. 1/16" is as close as I would go, to accommodate imperfections (ha!) in your garage floor when the wheels aren't in use. To help the lift, mount the dowel bar about a third or half way up the legs so your arms are straight when you''ve lifted the end..

Also, when you install a heavy bench vise it helps to put it at the wheel end.  Don't ask me how I know that one.

 

EDIT: the drawing says 1/6" or 1/8".  That should have been 1/16" or 1/8" of course.

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Did Tom ever finish his outside plywood work bench experiment?

We need to hear his results.

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1 minute ago, hobot said:

Did Tom ever finish his outside plywood work bench experiment?

We need to hear his results.

Wasn't that his bridge across his swampy creek?  Or was that someone else?

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1 hour ago, P_Wop said:

This is what to do with fixed wheels at one end.  Sorry about the crappy MS Word drawing.

 

workbench_wheels.jpg

I've done that with my stationary tools - works well.

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

I've considered it, and my side cabinets have a sacrificial ply top than can be swapped out, but I like the basic nature of this one. I can live with it's little imperfections, as I put most of them there. (all except for the time the wife was cutting holes in canvas for snaps, without putting down a sacrificial piece of ply. There's an area of the top that looks like it had chickenpox)

This is a good material for bench tops

https://sylvan-products.com/product/resin-form-film-faced-formply/

or you can use cheap white melamine. Get a pine core if they have it.

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

I've considered it, and my side cabinets have a sacrificial ply top than can be swapped out, but I like the basic nature of this one. I can live with it's little imperfections, as I put most of them there. (all except for the time the wife was cutting holes in canvas for snaps, without putting down a sacrificial piece of ply. There's an area of the top that looks like it had chickenpox)

Ok, my garage has been invaded by all my boat shit, since the boat is empty and in the yard. So I have no room for anything. The bench is in use for 2 things right now: Laying up some saddles for carrying the spin poles mounted to the deck, and the E-Rudder is in the vise (cant see the vise, the rudder is in the back) so that I can lay-up the rudder head for the tiller socket.  F-you guys with pristine work spaces...  B)IMG_1026.thumb.jpg.e4fb3253e230d8a0e43449d1791602f6.jpg

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14 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

F-you guys with pristine work spaces...  B)IMG_1026.thumb.jpg.e4fb3253e230d8a0e43449d1791602f6.jpg

I moved 2 years ago to a much smaller space. I bought some cheap furniture dollys and I put  2 totes on each. They roll out from under a benchtop amd give easy access. Thus i have auto lubes,  wax, etc in one place. Boat paint, wax, compound, supplies in another.  An epoxy and materials, etc all under  work surface.  I still get spread out and messy but I can stow it pretty quickly.15851943285194970478197302046053.thumb.jpg.4e95ab39d8d8fe0e91eb22281d405dc4.jpg

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Mine's not movable, by design.  Wanted a bench that was solid enough to do things on without worrying about wiggling.

10' on the long side, 6' on the "L", built with 2x6 legs 2x4 framing for the top and covered with 1" ply... and then lag-bolted into studs in the garage wall.  The height was set to be the same as the table for the radial-arm saw (out of view) at the left end.

There are a variety of machines mounted to the top of this thing and it is rock solid.  *IF* I wanted to move it, I could pull out a half-dozen lag bolts and drag it out into the other bay of the garage.... but have never yet felt the need.

 

done.JPG.7c11cec249eea77775c5fa4fcfb9ce4b.JPG

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9 minutes ago, warbird said:

I moved 2 years ago to a much smaller space. I bought some cheap furniture dollys and I put  2 totes on each. They roll out from under a benchtop amd give easy access. Thus i have auto lubes,  wax, etc in one place. Boat paint, wax, compound, supplies in another.  An epoxy and materials, etc all under  work surface.  I still get spread out and messy but I can stow it pretty quickly.15851943285194970478197302046053.thumb.jpg.4e95ab39d8d8fe0e91eb22281d405dc4.jpg

Nice

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Let the mocking begin

Note that a 6 x 4 trailer usually inhabits this area too

(hints on how to get the image the right way up would be good to)

4758BE1D-E515-4686-8687-1B1753A4FB44.jpeg

BD52B973-FA17-49C3-ADD7-3909E0583652.jpeg

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3 minutes ago, Rushman said:

 

(hints on how to get the image the right way up would be good to)

 

image0.jpeg.6b06541b49064fc507a75e57dcc63032.jpeg

Move to the other side of the world

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16 minutes ago, warbird said:

I moved 2 years ago to a much smaller space. I bought some cheap furniture dollys and I put  2 totes on each. They roll out from under a benchtop amd give easy access. Thus i have auto lubes,  wax, etc in one place. Boat paint, wax, compound, supplies in another.  An epoxy and materials, etc all under  work surface.  I still get spread out and messy but I can stow it pretty quickly.15851943285194970478197302046053.thumb.jpg.4e95ab39d8d8fe0e91eb22281d405dc4.jpg

 

6 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Nice

My goal , not yet realized, is to have no open dust collecting shelves. The cheap plastic totes keep the dust down, the furniture dollys make it all easy access.

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9 minutes ago, VWAP said:

Move to the other side of the world

Haha... hold iPhone/iPad with the home button to the right is the correct answer it seems

 

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I don't have much room so I have a smallish fixed bench then I built/building  the below.  A pair of modern builder saw horses that are collapsible. Fit a frame of 2x4to whatever length.  (Mine is 4' x 42" by choice) I was going to put a top on it but it is very useful with out the top.  

It stores flat, the open layout is great for clamping, bonus the saw horses are then useful for other projects anyways.

20200322_132034.jpg

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Here is my workbench. Very stable for those heavy duty projects but a bitch when it needs defrosting.

 

Workbench.jpg

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Ok, my garage has been invaded by all my boat shit, since the boat is empty and in the yard. So I have no room for anything. The bench is in use for 2 things right now: Laying up some saddles for carrying the spin poles mounted to the deck, and the E-Rudder is in the vise (cant see the vise, the rudder is in the back) so that I can lay-up the rudder head for the tiller socket.  F-you guys with pristine work spaces...  B)IMG_1026.thumb.jpg.e4fb3253e230d8a0e43449d1791602f6.jpg

what's that tool on the left, mini-planer ?

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1 hour ago, desprit said:

Here is my workbench. Very stable for those heavy duty projects but a bitch when it needs defrosting.

 

Workbench.jpg

very nice,  three nitro taps?  whatcha got on tap?

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8 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

what's that tool on the left, mini-planer ?

It’s a combo jointer(top) thickness planer(middle).

aluminum frame with cast beds. Good enough for light stuff/softwoods

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12 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

@Rushman - FYI the Simpson kit is WBSK - https://www.strongtie.com/miscellaneousconnectors_woodconnectors/wbsk_kit/p/wbsk

There are several going a bit cheaper on eBay.

Thanks

I think I am going to reuse a couple of items I already have

Bunnings in the morning for some timber and other bits and pieces

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6 hours ago, warbird said:

15851882075027641629524824707946.thumb.jpg.a60c2d54b74b79e9e54e16a3b9dc941d.jpg A pair of sawhorses is your friend. Inside , outside. These are getting new 36 inch legs this week.  Build them 18 - 24 wide so they are workbench width. They live in the garage but go out in driveway for sanding, routing and other dusty work. Short and long peices of plywood make a work surface, place 2x4s under the long plywood for support.

Never mind the work bench/table, tell us about that Mustang that belongs over on the "cars you'd like to own" thread...

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3 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

very nice,  three nitro taps?  whatcha got on tap?

No Nitro (yet). Running low on stock at the moment. Got 1 Pilsner. 2 Ipas a Porter an APA and an Elderflower Ale on Tap. Going to use the lock down to get kegs on the rest of the taps. 

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Not quite a work bench but I did recently complete this traditional style carpenter's tool box.  

Plans purchased at Lee Valley.  

 

IMG_0003.jpg

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Fantasy workbench. This guys bench weighs in at 850 pounds, it don't move. He uses a water level, I actually used them back in the day.

 

Photos of my set up coming after breakfast.

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38 minutes ago, Bugsy said:

Not quite a work bench but I did recently complete this traditional style carpenter's tool box.  

Plans purchased at Lee Valley.  

 

IMG_0003.jpg

 

Where does the separate panel in front of the toolbox go??  NIce job, kudos!! 

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14 hours ago, Rushman said:

Links to websites that might be useful

There's workbench threads on Woodworking Talk and Sawmill Creek that have been going a long time.

I bought a workbench and added drawers and it's the one I use most.  This was taken just after I finished the drawers (I use it on workbench threads because it's rarely that clean)
workbench_05.jpg.6f71d9a03180a98f60c54bf6325c416c.jpg

But I built a workbench for the garage out of construction lumber a few years ago.  It's a great place to start if you don't want to drop a grand or more for serious workbench.  This thing takes a fairly good beating.  I later moved the lathe on top permanently and the bench handles the vibration well.

BtrWB_02.jpg.e50d7495bfb3206085d1c3222c5cc940.jpg

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9 hours ago, peragrin said:

I don't have much room so I have a smallish fixed bench then I built/building  the below.  A pair of modern builder saw horses that are collapsible. Fit a frame of 2x4to whatever length.  (Mine is 4' x 42" by choice) I was going to put a top on it but it is very useful with out the top.  

It stores flat, the open layout is great for clamping, bonus the saw horses are then useful for other projects anyways.

20200322_132034.jpg

Those sawhorses are amazing!  But you already know that.  They can handle just about anything you throw at them, are really versatile, and are perfect for a knockdown workbench.

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23 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Where does the separate panel in front of the toolbox go??  NIce job, kudos!! 

In fronte of the draweres.                                  :)

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5 hours ago, Anomaly2 said:

Never mind the work bench/table, tell us about that Mustang that belongs over on the "cars you'd like to own" thread...

66 Mustang.  Gift to Mrs WarBird in 1991. Dent in every panel except roof and trunklid (boot?). 1 year restoration. The bare shell (brake lights only) was driven to a Manhattan Beach body shop for a rework. Reassmbled with all new felts, seals, rubbers,  straightened rechromed bumpers etc.241996584_2018-01-3019_50_38.1.jpg.993b4c0f5a1c0b5bc97f627f4d559dd4.jpg

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My bench, kind of cleaned up. I don't do any technical wood work, more maintenance and lots of welding projects.So this works fine.

RIMG0032-X2.jpg

This rolling tool box/bench came from a friends estate, it works well as a welding table.

RIMG0033-X2.jpg

 

A salvaged table with fold up legs works great as an outside cut table. Also a couple saw horses with some sort of top works well.

RIMG0034-X2.jpg

This is how it all normally looks.

100_7170-XL.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

 

Where does the separate panel in front of the toolbox go??  NIce job, kudos!! 

Thanks. 

For transport, the front panel locks in with pins.  When the lid shuts, it pushes down some pins to hold the panel in place. 

When not required, the front panel slides into the gap underneath the bottom drawer.  

Yes, red oak.  

I thought this would be a fun a project.  It took me about three years.  It required a precision measurements (often 1/64") that sometimes exceeded my capabilities.  I had to adapt.  The plan is here.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/plans/32761-tool-chest-plan

Thanks everyone for the excellent workbench plans.  I will be building a new bench soon and appreciate the photos.  

 

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1 hour ago, bmiller said:

My bench, kind of cleaned up. I don't do any technical wood work, more maintenance and lots of welding projects.So this works fine.

RIMG0032-X2.jpg

This rolling tool box/bench came from a friends estate, it works well as a welding table.

RIMG0033-X2.jpg

 

A salvaged table with fold up legs works great as an outside cut table. Also a couple saw horses with some sort of top works well.

RIMG0034-X2.jpg

This is how it all normally looks.

100_7170-XL.jpg

 

I'm coming over.  Every time I see a clean workshop, I start making a mess in it. 

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2
2 hours ago, Jules said:

There's workbench threads on Woodworking Talk and Sawmill Creek that have been going a long time.

I bought a workbench and added drawers and it's the one I use most.  This was taken just after I finished the drawers (I use it on workbench threads because it's rarely that clean)
 

But I built a workbench for the garage out of construction lumber a few years ago.  It's a great place to start if you don't want to drop a grand or more for serious workbench.  This thing takes a fairly good beating.  I later moved the lathe on top permanently and the bench handles the vibration well.

BtrWB_02.jpg.e50d7495bfb3206085d1c3222c5cc940.jpg

mine looked like that once...

 

Same exact vise too.

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11 hours ago, peragrin said:

I don't have much room so I have a smallish fixed bench then I built/building  the below.  A pair of modern builder saw horses that are collapsible. Fit a frame of 2x4to whatever length.  (Mine is 4' x 42" by choice) I was going to put a top on it but it is very useful with out the top.  

It stores flat, the open layout is great for clamping, bonus the saw horses are then useful for other projects anyways.

20200322_132034.jpg

What brand are those saw horses?

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14 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

Solid core fire rated wood doors make for a nice flat heavy work surface.

Especially when they're free.  Got one from my SIL across the street.  The doorknob hole make a handy place to put a parts catcher, end o the shop vac, or a tube leading to the trash can underneath.

It's a great benchtop.

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29 minutes ago, Jules said:

I'm coming over.  Every time I see a clean workshop, I start making a mess in it. 

I'm not anal about it but really try to keep it clean and organized. There's always some type of hot work going on. That doesn't pair well with a messy shop.

There's a guy I know here in town that does some very high end metal work, he puts out a large volume. I go over often to use some of his industrial stuff. His shop is immaculate, cleaned after every days work. When the cold saw is used the floor around it is mopped.

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16 minutes ago, bplipschitz said:

Especially when they're free.  Got one from my SIL across the street.  The doorknob hole make a handy place to put a parts catcher, end o the shop vac, or a tube leading to the trash can underneath.

It's a great benchtop.

i got mine free as well,  from work.... trimmed the knob hole off.  got a total of 4 doors.   they can take one helluva beating...

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22 minutes ago, bmiller said:

I'm not anal about it but really try to keep it clean and organized. There's always some type of hot work going on. That doesn't pair well with a messy shop.

There's a guy I know here in town that does some very high end metal work, he puts out a large volume. I go over often to use some of his industrial stuff. His shop is immaculate, cleaned after every days work. When the cold saw is used the floor around it is mopped.

Often, when I was working, I ended up in the switchgear room or electrical room.  It was my happy place because there was so many different tasks to perform.  I always kept those rooms spotless.  For one, nothing to trip on, but also because it made the work flow smoother, with less frustration.

But for some reason, at home, I wait until I can't work before cleaning up.  Lately, I've been reminding myself I need to treat the workshop the same as if I was working. 

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45 minutes ago, Jules said:

 at home, I wait until I can't work before cleaning up. 

Heh.  Mine's like that, but probably a step (or seven) worse.

At the end of sailing season I pull stuff off the boat and put it in the workshop.  On the work-surfaces, until I run out of room, and then in (arguably) neat arrangement on the floor.

Then, over the winter, my workshop seems to become a dumping ground for all the empty boxes from stuff that has arrived from Amazon, Fisheries, etc, etc.  Plus junkmail.  Plus magazines I don't have time to read.  plus-plus-plus

By the time spring rolls around, my "workshop" is basically a recycle bin, head-high with cardboard flotsam and junkmail flyers, and the sailing stuff I really want to get to somewhere near the bottom of the pile.  It usually takes a solid weekend to excavate the area, clean up the workbench and get the space back into usable shape.

I'd post a photo (it's almost that excavation-time-of-year), but... how would I live with the shame of my dirty secret being exposed for all to see?

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1 hour ago, Jules said:

Often, when I was working, I ended up in the switchgear room or electrical room.  It was my happy place because there was so many different tasks to perform.  I always kept those rooms spotless.  For one, nothing to trip on, but also because it made the work flow smoother, with less frustration.

But for some reason, at home, I wait until I can't work before cleaning up.  Lately, I've been reminding myself I need to treat the workshop the same as if I was working. 

Electrical rooms need to be clean & tidy - they can kill you.

Wood and/or greasy work, not so much.

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25 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Electrical rooms need to be clean & tidy - they can kill you.

Only after they turn the power on.  Most of the work I did in them was before they were powered up.

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Hate to be a contrarian (okay, I live for it), but you might consider a prebuilt bench. 

Sam's Club features the Seville line of work benches, tables, cabinets, etc. They're incredibly well made and sturdy. Plus, they go up in mere hours and look great. At $210, their six foot workbench comes damn near to the material costs alone.  I outfitted my man cave with pretty much all Seville. Very workable. Plus, as a Sams Club Premium member I waited for a sales event, and they were drop-ship to my door for freeeeeeee.

https://www.samsclub.com/p/72-inch-workbench-height-adjustable/prod22000197?xid=plp_product_1_70017641202960_A?$DT_Zoom$

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Electrical rooms need to be clean & tidy - they can kill you.

Can't count the times we left the electrical room spotless, only to come back and find the Maintenance Supervisor <spit> had converted it into a storage room

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here's mine. made it from scrap and leftovers from a house renovation.   It hasn't been this clean since either.

Workbench.jpg

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53 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

Hate to be a contrarian (okay, I live for it), but you might consider a prebuilt bench. 

Sam's Club features the Seville line of work benches, tables, cabinets, etc. They're incredibly well made and sturdy. Plus, they go up in mere hours and look great. At $210, their six foot workbench comes damn near to the material costs alone.  I outfitted my man cave with pretty much all Seville. Very workable. Plus, as a Sams Club Premium member I waited for a sales event, and they were drop-ship to my door for freeeeeeee.

https://www.samsclub.com/p/72-inch-workbench-height-adjustable/prod22000197?xid=plp_product_1_70017641202960_A?$DT_Zoom$

How long does covid live on that chinese worktop?

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27 minutes ago, VWAP said:

 

This might be a good addition to solve my outdoor needs

 

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15852576364516921990481115799717.thumb.jpg.5d763b3d3a89fffb19b6612c676b10ad.jpgThis unit is $16 for each end $16 for a pair of rails and $8 for the shelf. Welded steel, snap assembly. The 8 footer attached wood be just a few $ more stand alone.

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13 minutes ago, warbird said:

15852576364516921990481115799717.thumb.jpg.5d763b3d3a89fffb19b6612c676b10ad.jpgThis unit is $16 for each end $16 for a pair of rails and $8 for the shelf. Welded steel, snap assembly. The 8 footer attached wood be just a few $ more stand alone.

I do have a bench like that, 8 foot long and wider on wheels... cost closer to $500 all up here in Aus

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3 hours ago, Jules said:

Only after they turn the power on.  Most of the work I did in them was before they were powered up.

Scariest place I ever was was the main transformer room at the data center I managed.

When a big piece of electrical gear sounds practically like an idling railroad locomotive I don't want to be anywhere near it. :unsure:

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14 hours ago, desprit said:

No Nitro (yet). Running low on stock at the moment. Got 1 Pilsner. 2 Ipas a Porter an APA and an Elderflower Ale on Tap. Going to use the lock down to get kegs on the rest of the taps. 

i have the kegging equipment but not the kegerators ( long story)  but have a  rye pale ale and an irish extra stout bottled..  picked up supplies  for and ESB, Modelo Negro, and a porter  to brew...  some i'm set for a few weeks.. :P

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9 hours ago, Jules said:

There's workbench threads on Woodworking Talk and Sawmill Creek that have been going a long time.

I bought a workbench and added drawers and it's the one I use most.  This was taken just after I finished the drawers (I use it on workbench threads because it's rarely that clean)
workbench_05.jpg.6f71d9a03180a98f60c54bf6325c416c.jpg

But I built a workbench for the garage out of construction lumber a few years ago.  It's a great place to start if you don't want to drop a grand or more for serious workbench.  This thing takes a fairly good beating.  I later moved the lathe on top permanently and the bench handles the vibration well.

 

only 30 chisels?  amateur  :P

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Scariest place I ever was was the main transformer room at the data center I managed.

When a big piece of electrical gear sounds practically like an idling railroad locomotive I don't want to be anywhere near it. :unsure:

A picture of a data center I worked on, laying out all the conduits.  We started at 9' deep and worked up to 18".  There was three of us laying out where every bank of pipe ran, the turns and elevations.  

Picture34.thumb.jpg.a6105d7cc35198126b108f407aec81b9.jpg

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7 hours ago, bmiller said:

What brand are those saw horses?

Home Depot husky toughbuilt.  https://www.homedepot.com/p/TOUGHBUILT-Adjustable-Height-25-32-in-and-Width-39-9-45-9-in-Steel-Sawhorse-and-Jobsite-Table-1300-lb-Capacity-TB-C700/205870356

 

Lots of places have variations of them.  The set I got have adjustable height, lower flaps so you can rip sheets of plywood mostly vertically, as. 

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Thanks, I have a couple fold down horses but nothing like that.

years ago I read an article in fine wood working about building saw horses. An anecdotal story about a contractor who told apprentices to build a saw horse. Depending on how they built it determined if they got hired. There was a plan for some really nice horses that I built a few times. They are sturdy as hell and last a long time.

Edit: Found something similar to that article. https://www.finewoodworking.com/2007/01/09/build-a-classic-sawhorse

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9 minutes ago, bmiller said:

An anecdotal story about a contractor who told apprentices to build a saw horse. Depending on how they built it determined if they got hired.

I've heard of contractors doing that - pretty good idea. At a minimum you get a saw horse out of the deal.

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10 hours ago, Jules said:

There's workbench threads on Woodworking Talk and Sawmill Creek that have been going a long time.

I bought a workbench and added drawers and it's the one I use most.  This was taken just after I finished the drawers (I use it on workbench threads because it's rarely that clean)
workbench_05.jpg.6f71d9a03180a98f60c54bf6325c416c.jpg

 

I've never acquired a bench like that.

I'm not worthy of one.

I always kind of figured that it should be mandatory to build your own bench like that - if you can't you're not worthy either. :D

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7 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

At a minimum you get a saw horse out of the deal.

<lmao> years ago I worked for a defense contractor in SoCal.  At one point they were interviewing external candidates for an executive position.  Asked each candidate to come in with a business plan for the division in question.

Never hired any of them.... but got a half-dozen different business plans along the way.

That ended up being a 8-figure settlement, by the time the lawsuits and the labor-board penalties were done.

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Day one

Bit of a clean out to see what I have to work with

The previous owner was a retired engineer... 

The existing workbench was “constructed” from what ever he had laying around

 

0AAC2F9F-7957-4B2C-BD26-55EB487AEEF6.jpeg

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