Sail4beer

Old pics you found

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Going through the pics my Dad is procrastinating over during this shutdown . I found some classics from the 70’s and earlier and thought I’d share. There are more and some powerboats as well..:blink:

Newport circa ‘76

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0D40924C-BDCD-4B82-AC47-D238E9D6125A.jpeg

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Mom on the Toms River back in the early 60’s.

she was beautiful

1ECB4051-2F3D-40A8-9A18-9F9C569C6F55.jpeg

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Indeed.

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Aunt Nancy at the bow, big brother Ricky at the helm and Mom waving to Dad on Money Island

018EAE4D-5F90-49CF-877C-8B3B456E5D32.png

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De Havilland Tiger Moth with floats | Flugzeug

Probably 1964, nudging Ivor Faulconer's Tiger Moth seaplane onto the cradle and up the beach at Fishbourne, Isle of Wight,.  Yours truly far right, aged 9.  

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Kahlua Cup 1977 or 78, MORC divison,  2nd place by 24 seconds after 100 plus miles to Ed Baird driving  a little flush deck 25'er.  I'm driving, my best friend Rick Ware on my right, two guys from Ohio we picked up off the dock and my younger Brother Brad on the Bow.  My other brother Justus was with Dad on Dad's J24 with Donny Krippendorf driving. Boat is a Lindenberg 26, the owner couldn't make the race but asked Paul Lindenberg if he could find someone to sail it.  I was working for Paul at the time,  I got notice on Thursday for the Saturday race start and voila,  delivery from Tampa,  grab the dock wannabe guys and off we went.

large.1930378259_DawnTreaderKahluaCupbout1979copy.jpg.15f2ea0b0cfffee0b58f3a4d18dda99e.jpg

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I've only started boating in the mid 90s, and I don't come from a sailing family so I don't have anything that old.

But I do love this picture of the in-house designer for Betts Boats at the wheel of our 40.7 for the first time back in 2002.

Eyes on the telltales, kid.

 

IMG00028.thumb.JPG.ef02406756c2ac6adfbd7fcc5be0782e.JPG

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a young-ish sled setting up the peel.  probably the 1992 cabo race.
edited to add: I think that's @Dude at the mast, but brain cells are fuzzy
IMG_4152c.thumb.JPG.caba50d14561df3847418c4b22f3b09c.JPG

 

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46 minutes ago, sledracr said:

a young-ish sled setting up the peel.  probably the 1992 cabo race.
edited to add: I think that's @Dude at the mast, but brain cells are fuzzy
IMG_4152c.thumb.JPG.caba50d14561df3847418c4b22f3b09c.JPG

 

Asshole!  Now I’ll I can hear all night is the Brandstadt jumbos,  CLACK, CLACK, CLACK, CLACK!!!!

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48 minutes ago, sledracr said:

a young-ish sled setting up the peel.  probably the 1992 cabo race.
edited to add: I think that's @Dude at the mast, but brain cells are fuzzy
IMG_4152c.thumb.JPG.caba50d14561df3847418c4b22f3b09c.JPG

 

That looks like a Lirakis harness and the old B/G billboard jumbos.  Tick, tick, tick, tick. God I miss the ticking!

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10 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

That looks like a Lirakis harness and the old B/G billboard jumbos. 

probably was a Lirakis there, but I generally preferred a Petzl climbing harness.  Usually accessorized with a Sparcraft dildo... uh, I mean spike... though.

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For long races I liked my Lirakis, it was more comfortable to sleep with it on. Too many big buckles on climbing harnesses.

If I had to be aloft for awhile at the dock a Petzel was better.

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28 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

IMG_0009.jpg

 

Where is that?  I learned how to sail in El Toros on Lake Merritt (SF bay area), and that photo looks like what I remember.

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1 minute ago, sledracr said:

Where is that?  I learned how to sail in El Toros on Lake Merritt (SF bay area), and that photo looks like what I remember.

Taiwan..late 50's my dad and 9 others had 10 El Toro's built , I am 2nd from right with the burgee mast head fly..cotton sails and a 3' rock dam ahead, a few kids drifted over...LOL...exciting times

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19 minutes ago, ROADKILL666 said:

0672EE8C-D81B-44D1-A306-EAEA8A338BEE.thumb.jpeg.e5d626f080a59afa467240c19495a848.jpeg

Read Ruggles and ZigZag Zagarino days on the bay ~~~

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1 minute ago, BravoBravo said:

Read Ruggles and ZigZag Zagarino days on the bay ~~~

I sailed with Zag a couple of times he was one smart guy

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Myself, aged 14, sitting on the deck of  the Col Wild designed 'Ngataringa' in Mansion House Bay, Kawau Island at Squadron Weekend in February 1966.

We were anchored close by Tom Clark's 'Infidel', better known these days as 'Ragtime'

1566368291_SquadronWeekend1966CFonNgataringa.thumb.jpg.113d565e7de609c98bbcaf6985a26e69.jpg

Magic Flute foreground Infidel behind 1966.jpg

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12 hours ago, BravoBravo said:

IMG_0001.jpg

1969IMG_0003.jpg

Is that WP before aft mast was removed?  Just curious what boat is was.....

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42 minutes ago, @last said:

Is that WP before aft mast was removed?  Just curious what boat is was.....

I'm thinking yes.  the pedestal on the afterdeck behind the mizzen was a fairly unique arrangement.  Only other boat I can remember of that era that had a setup like that was Ragtime when they modded it for bouy racing for the ....73? 74? Cal Cup



34744327_10156385466679904_4048297956867047424_o.jpg.061f816e1309d47cd3737dfa79bba530.jpg

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G2.thumb.JPG.8d3c7b4ec1dd95b4352b85e12e683a5c.JPG

12m Gretel 2 in Fremantle.

Blade? headsail is an old #3 off the original Apollo!

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8 hours ago, sledracr said:

I'm thinking yes.  the pedestal on the afterdeck behind the mizzen was a fairly unique arrangement.  Only other boat I can remember of that era that had a setup like that was Ragtime when they modded it for bouy racing for the ....73? 74? Cal Cup



34744327_10156385466679904_4048297956867047424_o.jpg.061f816e1309d47cd3737dfa79bba530.jpg

 

IMG_0001.jpg

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1977 Whitbread.

Gauloises II (better known as Pen Duick III) lost her rudder within days of the start of the second leg from Cape Town to Auckland. She headed North to Port Elizabeth while a replacement rudder was being flown out from France. She and the new rudder arived at the same time. I bunked class from varsity to go and have a look. The town is not geared for yachts, so a harbour crane lifted the stern clear of the water and a diver slipped in the new rudder. 

wrtwr, 77 001.jpg

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1 hour ago, TUBBY said:

G2.thumb.JPG.8d3c7b4ec1dd95b4352b85e12e683a5c.JPG

12m Gretel 2 in Fremantle.

Blade? headsail is an old #3 off the original Apollo!

Never seen a 12 flying a jib that small.. cool, thanks!

Also, looks like they've got  rather few crew aboard.

FB- Doug

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9 hours ago, Somebody Else said:

Taken last week off Vouliagmenis, GR.

 

Insert "it's been a loooooong week" joke here....

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7 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

501457457_AugieHollanlaunch.jpg.f0c6941d10df99337271e3ab45aa1708.jpg

Cowhorn launch in Coral Bay.

.BREATHE.thumb.jpg.278e65ad105cc8fac20bd4b15a224323.jpg

Another Coral Bay built boat, BREATH.

 

 

the great age of self-actualization 60's early 70's in many pursuits 

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Sailing our 1930s Winabout (Town Class clone) on Lake Winnipesaukee circa 1976

 

06FBCE40-00BE-40D9-87F5-4F5F08F0A337.jpeg

Edited by superg
Better image
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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

got a cowhorn goin up me butt.jpg

Not so sure about this last one though.

 


Ummmm.... watch out for the bowsprit!

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12 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Never seen a 12 flying a jib that small.. cool, thanks!

Also, looks like they've got  rather few crew aboard.

FB- Doug

Yes the (we called it) code 6 was for Fremantle Doctor conditions, a second hand sail for when we needed it.  (And we did,  boat was designed & later modified for light Newport conditions,  not Fremantle.)  Worked surprisingly well.

I count 9 on deck (Ok I blew up the original),  with the jib still going up It's likely there are still a couple trying to tame the kite downstairs.

The heavy kite was one of I would guess a very small number of 1.5 oz 12m kites ever cut,  and the owner claimed that with the grandfathering she was allowed under the rule it was the biggest legal 12M kite ever.  

We called it the ankle biter as a grinder had to be downstairs pulling the wire lazy brace (guy) in on top of himself to get it down,  in 25 knots this was close to frightening. One person in a previous campaign had had a bight form around his ankle & the kite filled pulling him out of the hatch and dropping him with a crushed ankle in the water hence the name.

This pic is from the '86 12 Worlds off Fremantle

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top pic - yours truly at the bow of our old 26 footer. Younger brother at the helm, mom at the entrance of the cabin, dad just behind her - mid 80's

mid pic - me again, triming (trying to) the chute in light air. same boat, same period.

Duende 02.jpg

Duende 04.jpg

Duende 01.jpg

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On 4/5/2020 at 9:08 AM, StoMo said:

Weatherly.jpg

Wow, cool to see the old girl.  We had some great races here, first to finish Southern Straits w/ a broken headstay, starboard tacked Warrior off Edmonds on our way to first finish the Smith Island Race.  Was an honor to sail her and really appreciate she was restored and raced in the 12M worlds.

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18 hours ago, TUBBY said:

She's Apples Boat Pic 1.pdf

And another of my old favourites, She's Apples 2 first afternoon 91 Hobart.

Went on to first in IMS.

She's in Hobart these days, still being loved, raced, and cared for (as far as I can see).

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Yes,  ran into the new owners before the Noumea,  (sadly she the dropped the mast right after the start),  so didn't get to talk to them at the end.

That mast was an early IMS masthead noodle held up by stays in every direction,  runners & checks were critical to keeping it up and making her fast.

She will enjoy Hobart as she is a rocket to windward in 18 - 40ish knots and surprisingly fast and controllable down hill in a breeze for what is a 30 year old cruiser racer.

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On ‎4‎/‎4‎/‎2020 at 3:54 PM, Sail4beer said:

Newport circa ‘76

F7AB8D79-97BD-4DB2-AB6E-126DBD6A4CA8.jpeg

 

 

That brings up an amusing (?) memory.

In 1963, the Dougan family of Newport Beach (representing Bahia Corinthian YC, IIRC), bought Columbia and subsequently engaged in the 1964 and 1967 defender trials.  The first west-coast AC effort in the US. 

Somewhere along the way, they cut off the original stern overhang/transom and had a new one designed/built

Well, so years later (1976-77) I worked at a rigging shop on PCH called Pacific Rigging, which was owned by the Dougan brothers (Pat, Mike and Tom).  I didn't know anything about the time about their AC campaigns, but in the entry of the shop, they'd installed the old Columbia transom (actually about 4 feet of the stern) as a coffee table, with a glass top so you could see the structure inside.  Absolutely gorgeous, you could see the framing and wood planking, and the name in gilded letters on the transom.  Really a beautiful bit of craftmanship.  Wish I'd thought to take a picture - not only was it a bit of history, but those builders really built a work of art.

 

 

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One of the deals with Pacific Rigging was that they could install thru-hulls without hauling the boat. Yes... install thru-hulls while the boat was in the water.

This was before the days of cordless drills. The procedure was that someone would be standing by with a temporary patch inside the boat while someone else was drilling. As soon as the hole saw broke through to the water, the driller would scream at the top of their lungs and a 3rd person standing by on the dock would yank the electrical cord out of the shore-power socket. The patch was slapped over the hole. Then a swimmer with a snorkel would dive down and make sure the hole was good enough for the thru-hull. The fitting was prepped with sealant, the diver would place it in position, the nut installed and *bingo!* $1,000 saved.

But... the part where worker #3 yanked the plug out didn't always go as planned and frequently the driller would get 115 volts surging through his body. We complained to the brothers and they were all, "No, no... you're doing it wrong. Let me show you."

So Pat Dougan was drilling away and when he broke thru to water, he started getting the jolt. He screamed to PULL THE PLUG. The 3rd person on the plug may have waited an extra second or two before yanking it out. That was the last in-the-water thru-hull installation we did.

 

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11 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

One of the deals with Pacific Rigging was that they could install thru-hulls without hauling the boat. Yes... install thru-hulls while the boat was in the water.

Absolutely true <laughing>  Although it only worked for surface-mount thru-hulls.  If you wanted (for example) a flush-mount transducer installed, that was still a haul-out.

The summer before getting the job at Pacific Rigging, I worked at the yard across the street ("Bos'n's Locker").  They had pretty much the same perspective on water and electricity.  I remember at one point buffing out the topsides of a boat in the yard, in the rain, and getting zapped.  Of course the yard cords were ungrounded, etc.

First time it happened I went to the yard foreman to ask if I should be doing something different.  He just smiled, tapped the face of the timeclock and said "clock's running...."

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I had built a special shop cart for mast building. (I still have it in my garage!) A loooong cord connected to a 4-way receptacle, drawers and shelves for all the tools and hardware. The whole cart would fit in the boot of my MG Midget! (It stuck out a bit...) I'd been building all Schock's in-house spars for several years and I had the process pretty well sorted.

When the Dougans got a job to provide a replacement for a dismasted Catalina 30, they were kind of floundering around, trying to figure out how to come under budget. I spoke up, "I can do that!" They were like "... uh... OK but we've only budgeted for 1 day..."

I had the thing whipped out in about 2 hours, reusing all the hardware that hadn't been stressed by the dismasting. They made a shit-load of profit on that job and immediately started looking for more like it. Problem is... there's not a whole lot of dismastings in Newport Beach, CA.

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26 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

 looking for more like it. Problem is....

Yeah, I kinda went to school on that.  Over the course of a couple of years I watched their business evolve, from really doing "rigging" (like, masts, deck-layouts, instrument packages, etc), to mostly being a rigging "parts" shop with a showroom and a splicing bench, to taking on jobs like macerator installs in order to keep cash flowing.  Toward the end of their glory days, the costs of keeping the storefront open (property, plus overhead, plus there were usually at least two of the three brothers standing around telling sea-stories "on the clock) outweighed the amount of money coming in from, you know, actual rigging jobs.  At one point they had the contract to do all the commissioning for "Transpac Yachts" (the Ericson dealer next door), but that never generated more than once-in-a-while kinds of jobs.  Plus the challenge of getting what's-his-name (the dealer/broker) to pay for the work.

That's when I opened my rigging shop.  Worked out of the back of my car for quite some time, which helped make sure I had all my tools wherever I needed them, and ridiculously low overhead.  I remember one windy Midwinters at LAYC, in particular, where about a half-dozen IOR boats came in after breaking halyards.  I had a very profitable weekend doing wire-rope splices and such, right there out of the back of my car in the Fish Harbor parking lot....

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On 4/5/2020 at 3:28 PM, sledracr said:

a young-ish sled setting up the peel.  probably the 1992 cabo race.
edited to add: I think that's @Dude at the mast, but brain cells are fuzzy
IMG_4152c.thumb.JPG.caba50d14561df3847418c4b22f3b09c.JPG

 

You're clipped to a halyard

 

...Wussy.......:lol:

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13 minutes ago, Meat Wad said:

Merlin on her way  to breaking the Trans Pac record in 1976 I believe.

 

1977.

The record stood for 20 years.  And I think Bill Lee is still offering a reward for the negative of that photo.

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3 hours ago, sledracr said:

Absolutely true <laughing>  Although it only worked for surface-mount thru-hulls.  If you wanted (for example) a flush-mount transducer installed, that was still a haul-out.

The summer before getting the job at Pacific Rigging, I worked at the yard across the street ("Bos'n's Locker").  They had pretty much the same perspective on water and electricity.  I remember at one point buffing out the topsides of a boat in the yard, in the rain, and getting zapped.  Of course the yard cords were ungrounded, etc.

First time it happened I went to the yard foreman to ask if I should be doing something different.  He just smiled, tapped the face of the timeclock and said "clock's running...."

OSHA is not just a pain in the butt. :D

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Elliott 40 something “party pro” intentionally designed not to fit any rule in the mid 80’s

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Another Elliott, Here's a photo I took Jan. 1990

I heard there was a sistership,

"Pork chop" :lol:

IMG_20200407_152940442~2.jpg

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3 hours ago, 44forty said:

3BF8DBE3-C13E-4322-B5F1-3AEE2FAEE160.jpeg

That Sneaky in front of the mast?  and the Shersonperson

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43 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Holy crap.  Are all those people on the same boat?

Try IOR Maxis in their heyday.  I think 32+ on Longobarda in 1989.  Me 4th or 5th from the aft end, dark hair and beard.

Longobarda_2.jpg

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1 hour ago, wal' said:

That Sneaky in front of the mast?  and the Shersonperson

Fukdifino Wal , i was 12 at the time and fucking about with rubics cubes . Who’s the dude with the 7 iron tucked under his arm ?

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11 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

What purpose did that Hula Hoop serve?

80’s style kite takedown hoop !  
 

na it was my photos app doing something above my pay grade 

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1 hour ago, P_Wop said:

Try IOR Maxis in their heyday.  I think 32+ on Longobarda in 1989.  Me 4th or 5th from the aft end, dark hair and beard.

Longobarda_2.jpg

Completely different kettle of fish.

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15 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Completely different kettle of fish.

Just a really really big kettle of fish!

- Stumbling 

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2 hours ago, 44forty said:

Fukdifino Wal , i was 12 at the time and fucking about with rubics cubes . Who’s the dude with the 7 iron tucked under his arm ?

Elliot himself

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8 hours ago, See Level said:

Another Elliott, Here's a photo I took Jan. 1990

I heard there was a sistership,

"Pork chop" :lol:

IMG_20200407_152940442~2.jpg

Thommos boat...in pursuit of pork.

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1 hour ago, SPORTSCAR said:

Thommos boat...in pursuit of pork.

Don’t want to open a can of worms here ...but I can’t see many similarities between the above boat and any T boats ,  except for maybe topside flare and plumb bow . Can’t understand the whole  T copied E’s designs handbag fight .
 

Can you battle axes from the 80s can shed some light on how it kicked off 

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14 hours ago, 44forty said:

3BF8DBE3-C13E-4322-B5F1-3AEE2FAEE160.jpeg

no backstay?

(and judging by the boom angle, not a whole lot of spreader sweep either)

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On 4/5/2020 at 10:57 PM, sledracr said:

Where is that?  I learned how to sail in El Toros on Lake Merritt (SF bay area), and that photo looks like what I remember.

Since we're 'shoveling shit' here...

I also learned in an El Toro.

I think im 10 or 11 in this.  Little sister on Main trim, little brother moveable ballast.

Likely taken in Watch Hill, RI/ near 'The Kitchen' circa 1990ish

Beautiful sail shape eh?

PICT0011.JPG

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7 hours ago, hermetic said:

no backstay?

(and judging by the boom angle, not a whole lot of spreader sweep either)

Many of Greg's early boats were like that.  Reverse sheer, no backstay etc

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23 hours ago, 44forty said:

3BF8DBE3-C13E-4322-B5F1-3AEE2FAEE160.jpeg

No life lines? That must have been fun coming across the deck on a tack.

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1 hour ago, ROADKILL666 said:

No life lines? That must have been fun coming across the deck on a tack.

Check out the PDF linked in post 57, bitof a write up on the boat and some more pics, she had deep trenches built along the side of the coachhouse which may have mitigated the lack of lifelines, also the stern hung rudder is pretty wild as well.

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According to the specs that was one wide bitch.I wonder where she is now?

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2 minutes ago, Rambler said:

My first 18ft skiff. About 1978

colourtecknik10112015V2_0001.jpg

What kind of reinforcement did you have to do at the spinaker pole mast attachment connnect?  That's a a huge spinny pole combo and looks like a small mast section.

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1 hour ago, dolphinmaster said:

What kind of reinforcement did you have to do at the spinaker pole mast attachment connnect?  That's a a huge spinny pole combo and looks like a small mast section.

Effectively none (except don't let the main right out)

Here's a nice study of the boat approaching the beach in Double Bay Sydney which gives you some idea of the arrangement. The boat was quite old by this stage. I was still a Uni Student on a very tight budget and with a very limited sponsorship.

If I recall correctly, the pole was in multiple pieces which you had to join together as you pushed it out

colourtecknik11112015V2_0000.jpg

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6 minutes ago, Rambler said:

If I recall correctly, the pole was in multiple pieces which you had to join together as you pushed it out

typical owner... no idea how the front of the boat works <lol>

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0
 Advanced issue found
 
 
26 minutes ago, Rambler said:
My first 18ft skiff. About 1978colourtecknik10112015V2_0001.jpg

Way cool pic - didn't realise there were still 4 handers at that stage, but as you say it was an old boat.  Was the rig bigger than the 3 handers?  And who was the lucky bloke without a sheet or tiller extension to hang on to out on the wire?

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I'm a bit board with the lockdown (would much prefer to be going sailing), so going to take another step back in time and offer this beach photo of our Club's Easter Regatta in about 1968 over the lunch time break in the racing.

The kids standing near the boat on the right with the letter "A" on their backs are myself and my younger brother. The boat was called "Allambie" and built by my father.

The boats, sails down, on the left up the beach are the 18ft skiffs of the day.  The kids were given a ride in the last race of the regatta, hooking me on skiff sailing for life.

Heron 1968 eeaster Regatta.jpg

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

typical owner... no idea how the front of the boat works <lol>

No, just typical old fart with poor and mixed up memories :-)

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IMG_0020.jpgJust realized that was almost 50 years to the day 

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1 hour ago, DickDastardly said:

Way cool pic - didn't realise there were still 4 handers at that stage, but as you say it was an old boat.  Was the rig bigger than the 3 handers?

It was originally Booth Holden, the last true four hander ever built (for Hugh Treharne) and the last one still racing as such

The mast at 36ft was 2 ft taller than the typical 3 hander. It had 4 rigs instead of the normal three and the big kite was 1,000 sq ft - which I recall was about the size of that on an America's Cup 12 meter yacht of the day. On a light day it was critical to float gybe the spinnaker if you didn't want half of it under the bow. On a really light day, we'd send the smallest person up the bow to catch it just in case.

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2 minutes ago, Rambler said:

It was originally Booth Holden, the last true four hander ever built (for Hugh Treharne) and the last one still racing as such

The mast at 36ft was 2 ft taller than the typical 3 hander. It had 4 rigs instead of the normal three and the big kite was 1,000 sq ft - which I recall was about the size of that on an America's Cup 12 meter yacht of the day. On a light day it was critical to float gybe the spinnaker if you didn't want half of it under the bow. On a really light day, we'd send the smallest person up the bow to catch it just in case.

Way cool!

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OK, last contribution from me, least I bore you, but going back another generation, here's a photo of an older (cir; 1950's) 18ft skiff my father was crewing on

old skiff copy.jpg

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