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Shortforbob

Boo's eaten some fertilizer pellets..I think

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I was gardening yesterday and caught Boo having a nibble at some of the fertilizer pellets I put in a big pot. I immediately dug them in so she shouldnt have got anymore than that.

I don't think she'd have swallowed more than 1 or three.

Just got up and she's thrown up all over the kitchen floor, about five separate upchucks in diminishing amounts.

She seems OK, just a little woebegone.

It's Good Friday so the vets are all closed other than the emergency hospital in the city.

I just tucked her up in a blanket.

Do I just watch her over the next few hours or get her straight to the vet?

 

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Not snail pellets?

For that I think it is try to get Boo to drink and rest.

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If it's ONLY fertilizer - N+P+K- it's only salts and not toxic in small doses. Check the bag carefully for "inert ingredients" and anything  with a name longer than 10 letters  or that is definitely not a salt such as X chloride or X phosphate or potassium X.  No herbicide, or especially insecticides !

 

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6 minutes ago, Gnarly said:

If it's ONLY fertilizer - N+P+K- it's only salts and not toxic in small doses. Check the bag carefully for "inert ingredients" and anything  with a name longer than 10 letters  or that is definitely not a salt such as X chloride or X phosphate or potassium X.  No herbicide, or especially insecticides !

 

I don't think it's terribly toxic

but I'm not much good at understanding these things

I can't see that it's very toxic

https://fernland.com.au/media//esync/058680823752b3d8c62560fa7f3474cb/SDS - Searles 5 in 1.pdf

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Looks fairly harmless to me Meli but if you're concerned then ring the Poison Info line. Number is on that sheet

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The upchucking may have solved a large part of the problem.

If you are worried there is more residual  you could induce more vomiting using a mix of baking soda and water OR hydrogen peroxide. google the ratios depending on dogs size etc.

Its certainly not a fun thing to have to do but if the dog has  ingested something that may get them really sick or end up fatal then that ois an option to consider.

Given all of the upchuk  already I suspect the pooch has  expelled the problem and is just feeling a little miserable, that is probably a good thing and they generally will give what ever caused the problem a wide berth in the future.

Keep an eye on him plenty of water and rest would be my approach at this point

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7 minutes ago, albanyguy said:

Looks fairly harmless to me Meli but if you're concerned then ring the Poison Info line. Number is on that sheet

She's fine at the moment, just a bit sorry for herself. She'd have eaten this about 3pm yesterday and threw it up sometime after midnight.

If she's absorbed anything really harmful I'd think she'd be showing other symptoms.

No diarrhea so maybe just a sore tum. I'll just give her small amounts of water and maybe make her a little oatmeal later .

Boo's one of those dogs that eats anything she can find, beg or steal, carrot tops, fruit ...birds. and appears to have cast iron guts.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Navig8tor said:

The upchucking may have solved a large part of the problem.

If you are worried there is more residual  you could induce more vomiting using a mix of baking soda and water OR hydrogen peroxide. google the ratios depending on dogs size etc.

Its certainly not a fun thing to have to do but if the dog has  ingested something that may get them really sick or end up fatal then that ois an option to consider.

Given all of the upchuk  already I suspect the pooch has  expelled the problem and is just feeling a little miserable, that is probably a good thing and they generally will give what ever caused the problem a wide berth in the future.

Keep an eye on him plenty of water and rest would be my approach at this point

I don't think theres anything left to vomit. Must have cleaned up about a litre. Good thing she's big drinker.

I bathed her yesterday too, she could have drunk the shampooy water :wacko:

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51 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

I was gardening yesterday and caught Boo having a nibble at some of the fertilizer pellets I put in a big pot. I immediately dug them in so she shouldnt have got anymore than that.

I don't think she'd have swallowed more than 1 or three.

Just got up and she's thrown up all over the kitchen floor, about five separate upchucks in diminishing amounts.

She seems OK, just a little woebegone.

It's Good Friday so the vets are all closed other than the emergency hospital in the city.

I just tucked her up in a blanket.

Do I just watch her over the next few hours or get her straight to the vet?

 

Why won't you spring for regular dog food?

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M, It's still Thursday here. Can't you just go back in time a little to beforehand? 

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The PDF of the label had the word "ORGANIC"  your are safe. It also had "cow manure" . My dog just loves the stuff. That's why Boo wanted it.

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OTOH.

I cooked chicken tenders with Tarragon, brandy and cream yesterday. Boo got her share.

Apparently Tarragon is toxic for dogs. Learn something new everyday.

But I doubt there would be enough in it to make her sick.

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If your dog eat something it shouldn't have put a spoon of hydrogen peroxide in its mouth hold mouth closed with your hands until it's swallowed and in 5 to 10 minutes every thing will come back out (do it out side)

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2 hours ago, warbird said:

Why won't you spring for regular dog food?

The last batch of republicans was delicious , can you send Boo some more? :P

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Rice and boiled chicken diet for Boo for the next couple of days, let nature take its course

 

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She may grow to be a  Newfoundland retriever if you're not careful.

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1 hour ago, welder said:

If your dog eat something it shouldn't have put a spoon of hydrogen peroxide in its mouth hold mouth closed with your hands until it's swallowed and in 5 to 10 minutes every thing will come back out (do it out side)

Generally good advice, but for some poisons inducing vomit is contraindicated, either because they could cause more damage coming back up or might affect the ability to swallow and end up in the lungs instead.   The SDS linked said not to induce vomiting.   This internationally recognized document is the first place to go to for any concerns, a positive of globalization.   Sailing Anarchy is the second.  Good job Mel.

Ingestion: If product is swallowed or gets in mouth, do NOT induce vomiting; wash mouth with water and give some water to drink. If symptoms develop, or if in doubt contact a Poisons Information Centre or a doctor.

Inhalation of dust and/or liquid mist (bioaerosols) from these products may result in respiratory irritation, inflammation or sensitisation resulting in illnesses ranging from hay fever and asthma to pneumonia (eg Legionnaire’s disease) and pneumonia-like illnesses. The elderly, those with pre-existing respiratory diseases, and the immuno-compromised are at particular risk from these illnesses. All people working with these and other landscaping and horticultural products should ensure that they are adequately protected from tetanus.

Short Term Exposure: Significant oral exposure is considered to be unlikely. However, this product may be
irritating to mucous membranes but is unlikely to cause anything more than transient discomfort. Stray pathogens may cause gastric upset and possible health problems.
 

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1 hour ago, Rushman said:

Rice and boiled chicken diet for Boo for the next couple of days, let nature take its course

 

Yeah, I boiled a chook yesterday to make soup, she can have the some of stock and and half the chook cooked with rice. I've not fed her at all today.

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7 minutes ago, Lark said:

Generally good advice, but for some poisons inducing vomit is contraindicated, either because they could cause more damage coming back up or might affect the ability to swallow and end up in the lungs instead.   The SDS linked said not to induce vomiting.   This internationally recognized document is the first place to go to for any concerns, a positive of globalization.   Good job Mel.

Ingestion: If product is swallowed or gets in mouth, do NOT induce vomiting; wash mouth with water and give some water to drink. If symptoms develop, or if in doubt contact a Poisons Information Centre or a doctor.

Inhalation of dust and/or liquid mist (bioaerosols) from these products may result in respiratory irritation, inflammation or sensitisation resulting in illnesses ranging from hay fever and asthma to pneumonia (eg Legionnaire’s disease) and pneumonia-like illnesses. The elderly, those with pre-existing respiratory diseases, and the immuno-compromised are at particular risk from these illnesses. All people working with these and other landscaping and horticultural products should ensure that they are adequately protected from tetanus.

Short Term Exposure: Significant oral exposure is considered to be unlikely. However, this product may be
irritating to mucous membranes but is unlikely to cause anything more than transient discomfort. Stray pathogens may cause gastric upset and possible health problems.
 

Not my good job, she did it all by herself..on the couch, the broom, her dog bed . 

But I know about not inducing vomiting generally for irritants. :)

 

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See, I told you this crazy bitch was trying to kill me!  

Also, can someone please send me an Amazon package of dog food?  I'm starving over here.  A 25kg bag would be a good start.  Cheers.

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18 hours ago, Shortforbob said:

Boo's one of those dogs that eats anything she can find, beg or steal, carrot tops, fruit ...birds. and appears to have cast iron guts.

Just don't let Boo eat any bats.  

 

She might start coughing and sneezing and such.  :ph34r:

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Water her well for the next few days and you should notice an improvement.

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She's on the mend.

I had to hand feed her chicken and rice yesterday (yuk) but she's eating it on her own today.

She's still a bit quiet, lacking her usual bounce but showing some interest in food again.

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I'm really quite worried. She's really listless and weak. She seemed a bit better this morning.

She ate some rice and chicken this morning, but i had to put tuna in it tonight and she only ate a little bit.

Her gums are healthy, not white or pale, she doesn't seem to be in pain.

I'll call the emergency clinic tomorrow (I hope there's someone there on easter sunday) but their website says to book a phone appointment because of the Coronavirus restrictions. I don't know how I'm going to get her in the car if she's too weak to get in herself. I can't lift 35kg of dog.

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On 4/10/2020 at 12:33 AM, Shortforbob said:

But I know about not inducing vomiting generally for irritants. :)

 

With a child, sticking your finger down their throat usually induces vomiting.  With Boo, you might just lose your finger!! :blink::lol:

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Be glad you don't live in the tropics. About a year ago my dog dragged a flattened, semi-dried-out cane toad up from the road and had a good chew on it before anyone noticed. 

There is something very hilarious yet deeply worrying watching your dog tripping off her head.

Eventually she spewed and shat copiously, lay around for two days looking very sorry for herself, and made a full recovery. She hasn't touched a cane toad since.

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