freewheelin

Boat Dogs - What to look for?

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

We had some customs guys come aboard our boat somewhere on our travels. They exclaimed at the size of our cat (the more normal 12 lb black one). Then one notices the food bowl on the floor. 

Mr. Customs Man: "Do you feed your cat"?

" yup, fairly often "

MCM: " I have cat too. It is very small. Do you think it might grow bigger if I feed it?"

" it might. Start slowly..."

Different cultures, but I don't have to tell you that.

I spent a year in the United Arab Emirates.  I worked security at 2 ports. Cats are revered, dogs are reviled.

The port near Dubai was overrun with feral cats. We were told not to touch them for 2 reasons- Disease and local law would punish us if we were caught harming or harassing the cats.  We observed a feral kitten routinely getting its ass kicked by adults when scrounging for food at the nearby dumpsters, so we took pity on it and sort of adopted it. We fed it scraps from our tuna cans and bought a little dry kibble for it. We kept the adults away from it. Our corpsman postively screamed at us to "STOP TOUCHING IT!" because it was diseased and filthy, so we put on a set of heavy welding gloves and bathed it with dish soap and a hose.  When my unit disbanded and returned home, we gave it to a local hair dresser who took it to the vet for a full battery of vaccinations and adopted it.

The port of Fujairah was overrun with wild dogs. Never saw a single cat. This was a totally different affair.

Wild dogs roam and hunt in packs. Livestock ships would land in Fujairah and discharge their cargoes down "chutes" made of fence posts and barbed wire. Occasionally, the press of bodies would blow a hole in the containment system and a few sheep would escape. A pack of dogs would descend on a hapless sheep and "baaahh!! bahh! bah..ba-" Blood and wool everywhere. Like fuckin' Marlon Perkins and Mutual of Omaha's "Wild Kingdom."

We occupied the Inchcape Shipping office. This office had architectural pretensions, and only had a pair of fancy, sliding glass doors sealing it off from the brutal heat. Cool air from the A/C bled out from the gaps. During the day, wild dogs would camp out on the marble steps for the cool air. Stepping around them to get into the office was...nerve-wracking.

Because of the dogs, we never went down to the waterfront by foot. We always took a van.  One night, we had to go down to our boats for a mission but for some reason, the van was on an errand in town. Finally we said "fuck it" and began the 1.8 mile walk down to the waterfront.  Totally unthinking, I had a fresh bag of schwarmas with me that I intended to eat mid-patrol.  About halfway down, we were surrounded by grinning dogs, tongues lolling out of their mouths. Circling...closer.  We stopped. I looked down at the bag in my hand. My shipmates looked at me. In unison we all said "Shit!!"  I threw the individual schwarams at the dogs who tore them up and we quietly exited the scene.

At night, I'd lay on my fart sack (sleeping bag) in the Inchcape office, hearing the occasional truck roll by with a pack of barking dogs chasing it. Fucking freaks.

Looks like it got worse after I left:

https://www.emirates247.com/news/hundreds-of-wild-dogs-hound-fujairah-2012-10-31-1.480931

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On 4/20/2020 at 11:56 PM, randii said:

Sounds like cat Valhalla. :cool:

My best beachcat dog was a Newfoundland (my second of three). He would lack across the front of the tramp and enjoy the smells, sound, and sights... and with him and two humans aboard he was insurance that we'd never dump or drown. 

Newfies are awesome... but they take forever to dry. That might not be so great off a trampoline and inside a boat.

Our first dog (or was that pony) was a Newf.

Our breeder used them for dog sled racing, she had the sire so pick of the litter. She guided our choice...we should have considered her criteria compared to ours – in a puppy she advised big feet, big head, lots of energy – seemed fine in something you could tuck under your arm. He passed a 152 lbs while still a growing pup...we stopped weighing.

A perfect boat dog except for the size and the coat (we learned to wear nothing but black). Great with kids (our daughter would use his tongue as a hand hold while learning to walk or for extra leverage in the jolly jumper). No pirates would rob you and no pirates would get hurt (unless they really asked for it)...he would just insert himself between danger and his charges. Great for MOB - no one would drown when he was on duty. You might have trouble snorkeling if you got too far from the boat. If he deemed you in danger you, you had no input, you were getting rescued...and resistance was useless.

We miss him.

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My last three dogs have been rescue Rottweiler and Rott crosses. These examples weren't fans of the boat underway but when adopting abused adults you don't know their history nor have the chance to introduce them early.

They are-were great on the docks and liked the social aspect of the small dock community. One in particular became the happiest dog ever after she healed up emotionally. She had a way of inviting herself into anyone's circle, even on to their boat in such a manner that she was always welcomed with open arms. I used to cringe when she'd step on someone's boat and I'd say something to her. After being chastised several times for that I just shut up. She had been christened The Queen Of The Docks.

The one we have now kills any yellow jacket that dares come to his dock. The sight of a jumping, snapping Rott can be off putting but we or usually our dock-mates, whoever is closer, quickly explain the score to newcomers.

The most impotent safety tip I can pass along here is to get a Furminator for your pet.  Rather than clearing clogged hair out of the strum box every other day, weekly is enough now though I check more often. 

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1 hour ago, Autonomous said:

My last three dogs have been rescue Rottweiler and Rott crosses. These examples weren't fans of the boat underway but when adopting abused adults you don't know their history nor have the chance to introduce them early.

They are-were great on the docks and liked the social aspect of the small dock community. One in particular became the happiest dog ever after she healed up emotionally. She had a way of inviting herself into anyone's circle, even on to their boat in such a manner that she was always welcomed with open arms. I used to cringe when she'd step on someone's boat and I'd say something to her. After being chastised several times for that I just shut up. She had been christened The Queen Of The Docks.

The one we have now kills any yellow jacket that dares come to his dock. The sight of a jumping, snapping Rott can be off putting but we or usually our dock-mates, whoever is closer, quickly explain the score to newcomers.

The most impotent safety tip I can pass along here is to get a Furminator for your pet.  Rather than clearing clogged hair out of the strum box every other day, weekly is enough now though I check more often. 

Ya don't say! I think you should run around yelling "Mad dog!!" at the top of your lungs. Be sure to make a video.

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3 hours ago, monsoon said:

Ya don't say! I think you should run around yelling "Mad dog!!" at the top of your lungs. Be sure to make a video.

Funny.

Yes it is an attention getter but after people figure what's going on they cheer him on or invite him over.

And the stupid dog does not care when he gets stung.

 

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I had a Black Lab (Molly) and a Golden (Buffett) when I first moved aboard. Both were 6+ years of age, took to it great. Eventually, they went to the Rainbow Bridge and I was without Dog for a few  months.
Got motorcycles.

As much as I like to ride, motorcycles with boats are more of a pain than big dogs with boats. Also, more dangerous.

After a few months dog-less, I started walking pups at the local shelter. I met all of them. Wanted to get a small one so it could ride with me. Decided to try a foster. Picked out a small dog, cute little guy that was gone when I went to pick him up.
Picked another that, I dunno, just looked right to be a boat dog, even though he was 50'ish pounds and medium sized, too big for a bike.

An hour after getting home, already seeing the intelligence and personality of this scurvy hound, I realized I had a winner, and fostering went out the door. He's a Catahoula/Pit/Golden mix.

That is the story of how I quit riding motorcycles, and Barque Whitepaws became my new Crewdog and Best Mate.

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Some of the best dogs are mutts.

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So far he's done well over 1000 miles onboard various boats, mostly tho' my Alberg 30. Looking to double or triple that this coming year.

He is also apparently both far more attractive and friendlier-looking than his ol' Food Guy back there on the tiller... :D

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We had the boat then got a dog. He was selected by my wife and did make me angry because of my perceived limitations about boats and dogs. As mentioned above, dogs adapt and I did as well. we are coastal cruisers and I plan the longer journeys with appropriate Dog stops. We live on the boat for the summer. 
 

considerations: getting the dog off and on the boat. Mine is <25 lbs and I can easily hoist him on and off, his vest has a handle. Also mentioned was shade and/or keeping him cool. You have to be creative sometimes to block the sun. We have these thin cloths that look like capes. We wet them down and put on him. 
 

sailing: we tack the dog first, then the boat. We keep him teathered in and do not use netting. The life jacket can be too hot so we put him in regular dog vest so he won’t choke. In the beginning he was anxious and my wife got him so go go berrys or something like that. Those calmed him down and now we don’t use them. 
 

leaving him alone on the boat he escaped a few times and we learned what hatches need to be closed. 

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On 4/21/2020 at 6:09 PM, kinardly said:

Which brings me to ask why no one has mentioned a Labradoodle? I would think a dog with the no shed coat of the poodle, the temperment  and water skills of both breeds would have won some fans here. Size is a problem, I guess, but surely someone has an opinion? I' really curious.

We have Casey the goldendoodle and he is a great dog and a pretty okay boat dog.  He is very mellow and smart, happy to run or just lay around as needed.  He loves to stand up paddle, and will happily jump on the laser at a lake.  He does not really like boats with engines.  He was okay on our keelboat sailing and is nervous on the whaler (wants to sit on your lap), although that is new so hopefully he'll get used to it.  He had bad motion sickness as a puppy in the car so this probably contributes.  We had a lab before and he is much easier, just a great all around dog.  No shedding is a bonus although the hair just dreadlocks together instead of falling out so you need to get him shaved.  Would definitely get another or maybe just a poodle.

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@breezetrees  How does he react when you put the engine on in the sailboat?

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13 minutes ago, Ajax said:

@breezetrees  How does he react when you put the engine on in the sailboat?

He would want out of the cabin but was okay in the cockpit.  The 1 cyl bukh is a bit of a hammer if you're sensitive to that kind of thing.  Everyone relaxes when you turn it off and sail, not just the dog, even though you think you're used to it.

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@breezetrees My parents have one of those dogs. They love her to death.

I think she's a hyper-active "derp."  When they visit, the dog is just BEGGING to make friends with my wife's cats (well, one passed this February).  They/he are not fuckin' having it.  She is relentless and would corner them not to attack, but to smell, lick and play with them.

Generally being a Seinfeld "close talker."

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Love those telltale paw tracks on the laser. You can tell he's not intimidated, not at all like my labs.

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My English Cocker Fred, best boat dog ever. sailed, flew in small planes, traveled by car and worked with me for almost 14 years.  He crossed over the bar 2 weeks ago.

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Sorry to hear that. Losing a pet is always tough, but that's a long time.

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10 hours ago, zenmasterfred said:

My English Cocker Fred, best boat dog ever. sailed, flew in small planes, traveled by car and worked with me for almost 14 years.  He crossed over the bar 2 weeks ago.

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Sympathy and condolences from here. Sorry for your loss.

The world is a poorer place at the loss of a good dog.

FB- Doug

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My favorite dog portrait; Jamie Wyeth's JRT, Homer up against a perfect mid-day Southwester on the coast of Maine. Homer was getting on at this stage (gone now), he still had the look of the devil in his eyes. 

 

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A long time ago, but this big dog loved being on the boat. Actually, I don't think the boat part mattered that much, he just wanted to be anywhere his people were. Although he loved being in the water and would try to swim in a puddle. bent6.thumb.JPG.c938acefd7bb770616faa36a4f07c1e7.JPG

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

My favorite dog portrait; Jamie Wyeth's JRT, Homer up against a perfect mid-day Southwester on the coast of Maine. Homer was getting on at this stage (gone now), he still had the look of the devil in his eyes. 

I wonder if Homer ever got to ride in Andrew's jet.

New topic: plane dogs!

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18 hours ago, zenmasterfred said:

My English Cocker Fred, best boat dog ever. sailed, flew in small planes, traveled by car and worked with me for almost 14 years.  He crossed over the bar 2 weeks ago.

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Why, as much as I love dogs, my wife and I just can't bear losing another one. They just don't live as long as they deserve to.

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10 hours ago, ChrisJD said:

 New topic: plane dogs!

Ok, I'll play.

Pitot (yes, an English dog with a French name)

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8 hours ago, kinardly said:

Why, as much as I love dogs, my wife and I just can't bear losing another one. They just don't live as long as they deserve to.

We are in limbo and going to try going dogless for a while.  Fred did get to fly in private jet once and often in an amphibious Caravan from Seattle to Desolation sound in BC as well Beavers and Otters.  A well traveled lad he was.

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Grew up with a cat on a  boat, and was definitely easier than having a dog! Managing a litter box is simpler than having to take a dog to shore for regular walks.
If you are going to have a boat dog, something not too bit and with a chill temperament is probably best...

This guy is a bit of a handful and definitely not the best boat dog option, on the plus side the Northern breeds don't have the typical "wet dog" smell, which is nice:

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This guy does well but we started him early...

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And this back in the early 90's when we'd had the cat for years already...

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We had to lock her up at night when at sea because she would go crazy if a flying fish landed on deck and might have fallen overboard in the process of "retrieving" it! Other than that she only fell in a couple times at anchor.

 

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9 hours ago, Panope said:

Ok, I'll play.

Pitot (yes, an English dog with a French name)

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You named your dog after a fluid flow velocity measurement device?  Geeze, you really are an engineer.

Here's a joke for you:

An engineering student rides up to his buddy on campus, on a shiny, new bicycle. The buddy says "Nice bike, where'd you get it?"  The engineering student says "I got it from this girl. She rode up to me, thew the bike on the ground, tore off her clothes and said 'Take whatever you want!'"

His buddy said thoughtfully "Good choice. Her clothes never would have fit you."

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@Airwick Damn, that's a handsome dog.

 

WTF is it with everyone's cats falling overboard? I thought cats were lithe, agile, had awesome balance and spatial acuity? Why are they always falling overboard, like a bunch of 'tards?

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9 hours ago, Panope said:

Ok, I'll play.

Pitot (yes, an English dog with a French name)

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One of our dogs, the Schipperke-Shepherd mix, was adopted sight-unseen from southern Virginia. I asked my boss if she wanted to go for a plane ride over the weekend and she was all for it. We flew down and met the dog at the airport.  I gave my boss a big plastic bag and told her to ride in the back with the dog and use the bag in case she got airsick.

Boss: You brought me along as a dog vomit control person??? :angry:

Me: Of course, why else would you be here :P

It worked out, my new canine was thrilled to meet us, hopped right in the plane, and curled up to enjoy a nice nap :D

I once watched a Golden get out of a Jet-Ranger, walk over to a Bonanza, and lay the biggest steaming dog shit I have EVER seen right in front of it. The pilot did not notice, but I did. I was frantically waving and shouting and got his attention . Literally the shit almost hit the fan :lol:

 

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

You named your dog after a fluid flow velocity measurement device?  Geeze, you really are an engineer.......

I did.  

For better or worse, my geekness rubbed off on two friends:  They adopted two of Pitot's puppies and named them EDO (airplane float manufacturer) and GYRO (short for gyroscopic instruments found in aircraft).

 

 

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47 minutes ago, Panope said:

I did.  

For better or worse, my geekness rubbed off on two friends:  They adopted two of Pitot's puppies and named them EDO (airplane float manufacturer) and GYRO (short for gyroscopic instruments found in aircraft).

 

 

Is your friend Chinese?

 

(I apologize, I couldn't help myself) 

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1 hour ago, monsoon said:

Is your friend Chinese?

 

(I apologize, I couldn't help myself) 

Oooooh, das racist.

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

I thought cats were lithe, agile, had awesome balance and spatial acuity? Why are they always falling overboard, like a bunch of 'tards?

I think the short answers is because they are also goofs...

They are also very good at landing when falling so don't care that much if they fall off a tree! To put this in context she probably fell in 2 or 3 times in 15 years so it's not like it happened regularly...

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52 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Oooooh, das racist.

No, it's not. It is in poor taste (excuse me again), but also based on the fact that dogs are eaten for dood in much of southeast Asia.

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2 hours ago, Panope said:

I did.  

For better or worse, my geekness rubbed off on two friends:  They adopted two of Pitot's puppies and named them EDO (airplane float manufacturer) and GYRO (short for gyroscopic instruments found in aircraft).

 

 

FYI steel boats sometimes use gyros too ;)

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50 minutes ago, Airwick said:

I think the short answers is because they are also goofs...

They are also very good at landing when falling so don't care that much if they fall off a tree! To put this in context she probably fell in 2 or 3 times in 15 years so it's not like it happened regularly...

I'll bet she landed on her feet every time, too. Just, in the water where it doesn't really matter. ;)

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3 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

FYI steel boats sometimes use gyros too ;)

We had 'em on submarines. Last I checked, they weren't made of wood.

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Whoa, he swims like a muskrat!

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The down side of being an inquisitive skeptic is you may ruin some good stories. I was intrigued by the Turkish Van, a cat that “likes to swim”.

So I went looking for videos of one choosing to swim. What I found was plenty of evidence they could swim and that they readily/happily waded in shallow water. The fuller version of the above video only supports “they can swim”. All the swimming videos I found started with the cat already in the water or a person placing, even tossing, the cat into water and the cat immediately swimming for shore.

Any one have links or personal experience that Turkish Vans actually choose to swim? I’m not saying it isn’t true, just that I could find no evidence of it.

 

 

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Most cats would be utterly irate at getting tossed out of a canoe, so even if they need a launch assist the various cats in the videos seem happy enough swimming around.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5896691/Endangered-Turkish-breed-loves-water-gets-swimming-lessons-specially-cat-pool.html

They do seem to like the pool.

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Well... after being dogless for a year, I seem to have had parenthood thrust upon me.  Not what I would have chosen as a boat dog, had I a rational choice - a year-old Husky.  He's a big dog, but skinny, so still possible to hoist him under one arm (barely) as needed.  So now the problem is to make him into a sailor. (Along with the basic obedience, which is all new to him.)

So far, I'm trying to gradually acclimate him to the boat.  His most favorite thing right now is walkies on the waterfront path, where all the other (more well-behaved) dogs are!  So we always make a short stop at the boat for a security check and walk around the deck, as part of the fun activity.  I think he's not too happy with the deck shifting under his feet as yet. Oh, and I've been putting his life jacket on for a while, when he's just laying in the office, watching me work. I'd try slipping him a snack every time we go on board, but he's a finicky eater and snacks don't really hold his attention.  IDK if I'm on the right track with this.

The other problem is he's got severe separation anxiety, which we're working on. But I haven't been able to use the boat myself for a couple of weeks because I can't leave him alone. May need to recruit a dog-sitter.

Also somewhat camera-shy. Unlike some dogs who manage to photo-bomb every shot.

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We have a new pup on the way - 3/4 Husky and 1/4 Golden. This was not planned out, our friend's dog got pregnant and we volunteered to take one. About 3 weeks more until we can pick up our new pup :)

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Tonight was a beautiful evening for a sail - comfortably warm and a steady 12 knot breeze.

But we just went for a long walk, then rested in the cockpit enjoying some water and dog biscuits.  Ran the blower and the motor for a bit to demonstrate some of the sounds the boat makes.  Observed other people (and dogs) having fun in boats coming in and out.  

Everybody was happy.  Maybe next time we'll leave the dock.  Probably should have raised the main to get him used to those big flappy things overhead.  

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He still won't look directly at the camera.  Looks every which way otherwise.  Maybe they teach that in drama school...

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The way you are introducing him with lots of patience is good.  Spending the night can give dogs a sense of ownership too.

Something that has worked for us for a dog's first boating experience is to have one of us get in a dinghy and row a short distance away.  The dog then wants to get in the dink with whomever left them behind.

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^That would totally work with this guy! A couple of times, he has gone off-piste on our pre-breakfast runs. If I follow him, he’ll lead me on a merry chase for as long as I care to follow.  But if ignore him, and keep on the trail, he catches up in a hurry!

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Finding a way to make boating the dog's idea is a neat trick.

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My biggest issue with all my dogs has never been that they didn't like the boat, it is that they freak the hell out when left alone on the boat. None of them were happy and some would have barking fits.

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Well we've had :

a Griffon Bruxellois, actually my sisters,  but stayed with my parents all his life,  small flat faced but they don't have breathing problems.  Great if you want a burglar alarm. They'll bark at any disturbance,  but are otherwise a peaceful dog. 

Border collies, there's one asleep 6 ft from me now,  , not too fond of water, but highly intelligent,  don't get one if you are going to leave it alone,  they get bored , they get destructive.. On A boat they want to know what's going on all the time. 

Rough collies, ( lassie)  we've had seven,  much more relaxed a dog,  once they're happily settled on the boat they'll go to sleep in a corner.  One we had was devoted to the wife,  followed her around, even when she lept off the boat to tie up.... Fishing 70lbs of Collie + water in all that fur, out of the River was difficult.  

Both borders and roughs are not too good in high temperatures,  

Someone I know had two Bernese Mountain dogs,  not to bad on a motor boat if you don't have to lift them in they can be over 100lbs..one of the two liked sailing with him,  trouble was he had a heron dinghy, just over 11ft long and not much heavier than the dog.  It would sit bolt upright in the middle of the boat as he sailed it around. Tacking with the dog was interesting.. 

 

 

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On 4/26/2020 at 1:03 PM, kinardly said:

Why, as much as I love dogs, my wife and I just can't bear losing another one. They just don't live as long as they deserve to.

We are going dogless for a while, been out cruising locally on and off for a month and a half, after many years of dog boating it is different not thinking about the next trip ashore, really miss the little tyke though, last of 5 English Cockers I have had, hair instead of fur so don't shed but do need hair cuts.

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First sail did not go too well. There was howling.  Then he paced the decks and appeared to be contemplating abandoning.  This was a flat sail in like, 8 knots of wind.  

Tether and jackline for dogs... is this a thing?  I'm guessing he'd get out to the end of it then get tangled.  Or just chew the damned thing off. I could do it in coated wire...

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9 hours ago, toddster said:

First sail did not go too well. There was howling.  Then he paced the decks and appeared to be contemplating abandoning.  This was a flat sail in like, 8 knots of wind.  

Tether and jackline for dogs... is this a thing?  I'm guessing he'd get out to the end of it then get tangled.  Or just chew the damned thing off. I could do it in coated wire...

Our Border Collie/Husky mix did not take to the boat at all. He seemed to be scared or nervous the whole time. He only went on a couple of trips before he got a brain tumor and died at a young age, so we never did find out if he was going to adapt :(

 The dog on the left in my avatar went on her first boat trip soon after we got her. Perhaps we should have waited for a better day, it was a 6 hour beat into 15-25 and she ended up getting quite seasick :o I got her up into the cockpit and pointed out at the horizon. She visibly relaxed, loved the boat from then on, and never got sick again now that she knew the trick B) The dog on the right WANTS to sail, but she is 15 now and kind of frail and has old lady bathroom issues, When she needs to go, she needs out the door NOW. She doesn't go on long trips anymore.

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12 sailing seasons on - first sail in the spring, ours seem to settle into the same spots (including the woman with the book). 

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I have no doubt that dogs enjoy the seclusion with their masters on this floating thing. Long before they see it, on approach under oar, they pick out it's unique scent from far downwind. 

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From below, they see everything for hundreds of yards with their noses. All I see from down below is the way the fog becomes visible on old bronze screening. 

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On 6/10/2020 at 11:18 PM, Autonomous said:

The way you are introducing him with lots of patience is good.  Spending the night can give dogs a sense of ownership too.

Something that has worked for us for a dog's first boating experience is to have one of us get in a dinghy and row a short distance away.  The dog then wants to get in the dink with whomever left them behind.

This is exactly my experience.

Plus when they need to pee and get in the dinghy to go ashore, they get a hit a hit of positive reinforcement. But getting them to relax about getting into the dinghy in the first place does require a bit of forethought and stage-managing.

FB- Doug

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6 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

This is exactly my experience.

Plus when they need to pee and get in the dinghy to go ashore, they get a hit a hit of positive reinforcement. But getting them to relax about getting into the dinghy in the first place does require a bit of forethought and stage-managing.

FB- Doug

The dog on the left was in a hurry to pee, jumped out of the cockpit, cleared the stern pulpit, flew about 10 feet aft, and BOING bounced right off the dinghy tube another 10 feet into the water :lol:

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Hmmm. Will a dog pee while swimming? You know, like us taking a leak in the shower.

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On 6/11/2020 at 3:36 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

My biggest issue with all my dogs has never been that they didn't like the boat, it is that they freak the hell out when left alone on the boat. None of them were happy and some would have barking fits.

This is why we've never taken Kirby cruising with us, only daysails and overnights: we're selfish and want to be able to do things like go to restaurants, but know that we would never be able to leave the little guy on board without it ruining him emotionally.  We're convinced the main reason he loves sailing so much is his belief that there's nowhere for us to go and so he doesn't have to worry about us leaving.

That said, no indoor dining this summer anyway, so this year might be his first real chance.

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On 6/30/2020 at 4:19 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

Here she is - she is arriving later today :D
 

yura1.JPG

Cute pup! Hope all goes well with her acclimatization.

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On 6/30/2020 at 7:19 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

Here she is - she is arriving later today :D
 

yura1.JPG

Awwww!

Sorry, couldn't help myself. :D  She's a real cutie pie!

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On 4/27/2020 at 8:03 AM, kinardly said:

Why, as much as I love dogs, my wife and I just can't bear losing another one. They just don't live as long as they deserve to.

A handsome chap indeed. Our last dog was an English Springer Spaniel for 14 years. Re-built cruciate ligaments (very bloody expensive) and all. Loved her to bits. Can't contemplate another dog - and it's been 6 years.

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13 hours ago, kinardly said:

Cute pup! Hope all goes well with her acclimatization.

So far so good. The cat is not pleased at all though with having a new dog to deal with. She will go hiss at the new pup and then make a point of rubbing up against the old dog. "This dog over here is my dog and YOU are new and annoying" Poor pup just wants to play with her new feline packmate.

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