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Dorado

Dave, the knife guy

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This vid was shot at The Knife Merchant in San Diego. I went there to kill some time before a tuna fishing trip and Dave spent an hour with me, showing me all the cool stuff and giving me quite the education. Guy really knows his stuff. Good website too.

I left there a lot smarter and $350 lighter.

If you like chef knife geekery . . .

 

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Was he up in the SF Bay Area years ago? I seem to remember an old white bread van with his name on it, great local reputation.

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1 hour ago, chum said:

Was he up in the SF Bay Area years ago? I seem to remember an old white bread van with his name on it, great local reputation.

Don't know about that. But there was a great little shop in Berkeley called Hida Tool Company that sold Japanese knives and carpentry hand tools. 

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3 minutes ago, Dorado said:

Don't know about that. But there was a great little shop in Berkeley called Hida Tool Company that sold Japanese knives and carpentry hand tools. 

I remember a shop like that on Alameda next to a chandlery. It’s been a long time.

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I love to cook and always just "made do" with whatever was in the drawer. But as a guy who cooks a lot of gumbo, that means a lot of chopping and for Christmas this year, my wife took me shopping. We went to Sur la Table (or whatever it's called) and I tried a number of their knives. What I found interesting is the on some knives when the back of the blade hit the cutting board, so did my knuckles. I found a Japanese knife with a little more room between the bottom of the handle and the bottom of the blade. I'm amazed at how much difference it makes. It's a true pleasure to use and, needless to say, a beautiful and sharp blade

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By the way if you have a steel hood over your stove you can screw two magnetic knife holders back to back and keep your knives in a place that does not intrude on counter space. At my house the main cutting board is just to the left of the hood and I am right handed. Works really well.

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i picked up a pair of japanese knives a number of years ago, love them,  my wife keeps buying ceramic knife crap...   i have a nice cleaver , but i haven't had the time to get a good blade shape on it to where i'll use it..

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My late Mom bought me a low-end Kikuichi carbon steel chef's knife as a birthday present about 15 years ago. The stamped blade is very light weight and takes a wicked edge so it's my wife's favorite. The fit of the scales to the tang was pretty bad and they eventually let water behind, which rusted the tang and raised them so they nearly come off. However, the scales themselves are made out of some sort of epoxy resin-impregnated wood that's indestructible. I drilled the rivets out, cleaned up the tang, and epoxied the scales back on, filling the rivet holes and all the gaps between the scales and tang. It's now better than new and I expect to get at least another 15 years out of it. 

I see that the Knife Merchant isn't a fan of Sabatier but the carbon versions made by Thiers are fantastic and very reasonably priced. There's a small shop in Boston called China Fair that sells the 8" version for $70 on Amazon and it's a steal:

https://www.amazon.com/Sabatier-French-Forged-Stainless-Knife/dp/B00D5VLL2W/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&m=AHR3ZELXJMCGH&marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&qid=1587683466&s=merchant-items&sr=1-2

 

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On 4/23/2020 at 11:01 AM, Dorado said:

Don't know about that. But there was a great little shop in Berkeley called Hida Tool Company that sold Japanese knives and carpentry hand tools. 

The most over priced, self righteous bunch of con men I ever ran into (Up until DJT)

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29 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

The most over priced, self righteous bunch of con men I ever ran into (Up until DJT)

Do tell . . .

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On 4/22/2020 at 10:29 PM, Dorado said:

This vid was shot at The Knife Merchant in San Diego. I went there to kill some time before a tuna fishing trip and Dave spent an hour with me, showing me all the cool stuff and giving me quite the education. Guy really knows his stuff. Good website too.

I left there a lot smarter and $350 lighter.

If you like chef knife geekery . . .

 

I love this shit!! I sharpen all my own knives (chisels and plane irons as well) and can always use tips. I'm getting pretty good at holding the angle but it sure takes practice!!

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4 hours ago, Dorado said:

Do tell . . .

I just did. But to elucidate, they had (when I was there) mid-low to mid quality tools boxed up pretty and selling at premium prices.

 When I pointed out that their Oak handled chisel set could be bought for about 40% of their asking price from other vendors they got huffy, claimed theirs were better, etc. But they were the same chisels. They abandoned me for a wealthy looking woman who wanted something for her Dr. Husband's birthday.....

Reminded me of Bridge City Tools.

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5 hours ago, Point Break said:

I love this shit!! I sharpen all my own knives (chisels and plane irons as well) and can always use tips. I'm getting pretty good at holding the angle but it sure takes practice!!

Water stones  ?

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3 hours ago, Dorado said:

Water stones  ?

i got a couple of water stones,  but haven't built a stand for them yet....   i have a spyderco sharpener,  i can get a pretty good edge on my knives...   i need to up my game on chisels though

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8 hours ago, Point Break said:

I love this shit!! I sharpen all my own knives (chisels and plane irons as well) and can always use tips. I'm getting pretty good at holding the angle but it sure takes practice!!

Same here, always feels like you have been holding a good, consistent angle. Then you realise you have almost made it worse...

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1 hour ago, Gissie said:

Same here, always feels like you have been holding a good, consistent angle. Then you realise you have almost made it worse...

and just to think, if times get real tough, you came make a living sharpening things..

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Just now, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

and just to think, if times get real tough, you came make a living sharpening things..

Could handy when the lead runs low. Sharp stuff can cause some serious damage.

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I sharpened freehand for years, but was always unhappy with results- the bevels were inevitably somewhat convex. I now use a Veritas jig for plane irons and chisels. Water stones followed by a strop. For knives, I bought an Edge Pro Apex system, along with a couple of the optional Shapton stones for the higher grits. Kinda spendy, but all of my knives, including my good kitchen knives now have beautiful consistent polished bevels.

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I have multiple sets of Japanese water stones. Some used exclusively for plane irons, chisels, et. and others that are (usually broken, older stones) used for knives and spokeshaves, ans other things with curved edges.

 I have a set of Shaptons, which very rarely get used any more, but they are the cat's meow for a really good edge on planes, and chisels.

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Those Dave the Knife Guy videos are something else.  I have watched a bunch and just keep learning new shit.  WOW

MS

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On 4/24/2020 at 3:31 PM, Dorado said:

Water stones  ?

Yep, I played around with the oilstones but its messy and no better edge that I could tell.

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On 4/24/2020 at 8:25 PM, Grizz said:

I sharpened freehand for years, but was always unhappy with results- the bevels were inevitably somewhat convex. I now use a Veritas jig for plane irons and chisels. Water stones followed by a strop. For knives, I bought an Edge Pro Apex system, along with a couple of the optional Shapton stones for the higher grits. Kinda spendy, but all of my knives, including my good kitchen knives now have beautiful consistent polished bevels.

I have the veritas jig as well. I started with that but have slowly been moving to freehand. I'll check out the Edge Pro.

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Yep, I played around with the oilstones but its messy and no better edge that I could tell.

You should go visit these guys after all this crap blows over. You'll learn a lot. Nice people. 

Take a knife that needs tuning up. If it's not too busy, they'll probably take you into the back and sharpen it while you watch.

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On 4/25/2020 at 8:38 AM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i got a couple of water stones,  but haven't built a stand for them yet....   i have a spyderco sharpener,  i can get a pretty good edge on my knives...   i need to up my game on chisels though

My whole approach to Chisel sharpening has been turned upside down about 6 years ago. Long time user of Oil Stones, but its smelly dirty work.

Got given a piece of 10mm Plate Glass (an old glass shelf I believe) and now use this with standard Wet n' Dry with most grades from 400 through to 1200 - always wet with a Jig (not Veritas). The Glass just acts a perfectly flat surface for the Paper and Jig to roll on.

The water's surface tension holds the paper firmly enough to the glass. Set the chisel in the jig - work through the grades - but make sure you flatten the back of the chisel at each grade also. 1200 gives a near mirror finish. The paper gets rotated through a painters roller tray and then dried flat after (to prevent roll up). Jig just keeps the bevel angle absolutely constant and is wide enough for planer blades. I put a couple of drops of liquid soap in the water as well.

I also use a old leather belt at the end as a strop to give the final razor finish. Well worth it, as it takes them from Sharp to Wicked. Also they live in a leather roll which is handy to give them a tickle with.

Chisel use becomes an absolute pleasure - but no  one gets to borrow  (which actually helps keep them sharper for longer). Do it; your wordwork will be so much better for it. 

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15 hours ago, Dorado said:

You should go visit these guys after all this crap blows over. You'll learn a lot. Nice people. 

Take a knife that needs tuning up. If it's not too busy, they'll probably take you into the back and sharpen it while you watch.

Good advice. I took a class at Woodcraft - our local woodworking chain store. Good class and a great springboard to doing my own sharpening. I'm far from a master sharpener though and always looking for tips.

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10 hours ago, Boink said:

My whole approach to Chisel sharpening has been turned upside down about 6 years ago. Long time user of Oil Stones, but its smelly dirty work.

Got given a piece of 10mm Plate Glass (an old glass shelf I believe) and now use this with standard Wet n' Dry with most grades from 400 through to 1200 - always wet with a Jig (not Veritas). The Glass just acts a perfectly flat surface for the Paper and Jig to roll on.

The water's surface tension holds the paper firmly enough to the glass. Set the chisel in the jig - work through the grades - but make sure you flatten the back of the chisel at each grade also. 1200 gives a near mirror finish. The paper gets rotated through a painters roller tray and then dried flat after (to prevent roll up). Jig just keeps the bevel angle absolutely constant and is wide enough for planer blades. I put a couple of drops of liquid soap in the water as well.

I also use a old leather belt at the end as a strop to give the final razor finish. Well worth it, as it takes them from Sharp to Wicked. Also they live in a leather roll which is handy to give them a tickle with.

Chisel use becomes an absolute pleasure - but no  one gets to borrow  (which actually helps keep them sharper for longer). Do it; your wordwork will be so much better for it. 

I've seen some folks using that approach. I tinkered with it a little but couldn't get the paper to hold as firmly. Pretty happy with the stones. 

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On 4/27/2020 at 12:48 PM, Point Break said:

I tinkered with it a little but couldn't get the paper to hold as firmly.

A littelle rubbere cemente helpes allotte with that.                                 :)

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8 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

A littelle rubbere cemente helpes allotte with that.                                 :)

:lol:

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