Bryanjb

East Coast yards for winter haul out?

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So it looks like this Wuhan Flu fallout is going to take longer than any of us hoped.  As such we've made the decision to sail back to the States.  We'll cruise the East Coast for the summer and fall then haul for the winter.  We don't believe the Caribbean islands will reopen in November, hence our thoughts

We're looking for East Coast yard recommendations to haul for the off season and have some work done. (mechanical, bottom, glass, paint...)

We're 61', 15' beam, 65,000 displacement and 9' deep.  We don't anticipate unstepping the spar.

We prefer yards who are mostly sail oriented and comfortable handling larger sailing vessels.

Thanks!

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Either of the Lyman Morse yards in Maine - we’ve hauled  both a 42’er and 72’er at their Camden yard and had great experiences.

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Also in Maine, Front street and Billings boat yard capable of handling what you’re looking for

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I’m not sure how Lyman Morse feels about leaving mast up these days, and having the mast in will severely limit getting work done  

The bigger yards in Maine certainly would be good. Lyman Morse, Front Street

also could go with Great Island Boatyard, Hodgdon Yacht Services, Maine Yacht Center. 
 

 

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Brooklin Boat Yard has built and launched bigger boats. 

For prices, Maine is cheaper than RI.

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Try the old New England Boatworks, now Safe Harbor New England Boatworks.  Two hours up the bay from Newport. Lots of big sailboats, don't know what the new owner situation means. 

 We've also been pondering the question of when the Caribbean islands will re-open. We are planning a year and a half, two winters and the summer in between. Hoping to go this fall but I fear you may be right. We have until probably August to decide so for now it's wait and see.

 

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If you might want warmer winter weather for your work, check out Charleston City Boatyard on the Wando River (now also part of the Safe Harbor megaplex, which itself is managed by Rives Potts and the former Brewers team).  They do plenty of sailboat work, if a bit less proportionally than some of the Maine yards or NEB.  The upside of wintering in Charleston is that you won’t be shut in, and in the off chance the Caribbean opens up, you can easily make the passage there at any point in the winter or spring.  And you have some decent local cruising grounds among the rivers and estuaries down there that are gorgeous in the winter and early spring months.  And finally, you’re based in Charleston, which is not a bad place to be.

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I’m not sure I’d leave my spar stepped in a Maine, or even a New England Winter, but that’s not my call. 

I’ve kept my shitbox with Lyman-Morse for a long time, so I’m be biased towards them. They handle a lot of larger sailboats. 

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11 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I’m not sure I’d leave my spar stepped in a Maine, or even a New England Winter, but that’s not my call. 

Ever drive through Rockland on rte 1? Knights marine is a forest of spars all year long it seems. 
 

some yards require a cradle for leaving the mast up some don’t. 

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26 minutes ago, mgs said:

Ever drive through Rockland on rte 1? Knights marine is a forest of spars all year long it seems. 
 

some yards require a cradle for leaving the mast up some don’t. 

Yes, but people do lots of things that I wouldn’t - and I’m sure vice versa. Mud season and high winds - yikes. I like my boat indoors and above freezing. 
 

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15 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Yes, but people do lots of things that I wouldn’t - and I’m sure vice versa. Mud season and high winds - yikes. I like my boat indoors and above freezing. 
 

Amen brother. If you're going to have work done, skilled labor at LM or BBY is much cheaper than in RI. If you plan to DIY, neither is the place for you.

In RI a surprising number of people leave their boats in the water with bubbler ("bubblah") systems. 

I've paid a couple of bills at LM over the years, I thought they were quite reasonable, and the work was first class. Restive lives at BBY because they built her and know her. 

A friend had a boat restored at Front Street, he was very happy with the work. It was a steel boat, he used her for a couple of years then gave her to Mystic Seaport. 

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Do you care where on the East Coast? You have Florida to Maine to consider. If you stay south of Virginia the odds of having warm enough weather to get a lot of temperature-dependent work done get much higher. Of course this year Maryland had a winter temps typical of Georgia, but that may not happen every year.  Also note that winter "storeage" may mean boats crammed so tight it is very hard to do much work, you need to talk to the marina about what you want done. Many marinas do not want any power run to the boats when you are not aboard and some may not allow power at all. FYI

 

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We're comfortable anywhere on the East Coast provided the yard knows sailboats sufficiently.  We even talked about going back to Michigan for the winter, that would require unstepping the mast for indoor heated storage.  Not sure we want to do another 8,000 miles of sailing this year.

Winter storage in Maine, spar down, heated seems to be about twice the cost of the great lakes.  Seems high but maybe I didn't read the rate sheet correctly.

We won't be back till late May, so plenty of time to review yards and get a reservation in.  

Thank you for all the recommendations!

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I brought a 64'x16'x6.5' ketch to Oxford Boat Yard, on the eastern shore of MD, a couple different times. It's been many years, and they've since become part of Brewer/Safe Harbor as well, so can't speak to what you might experience now. That said, your boat should fit (web site says 9' at MLW in the marina; I'd want to confirm haul out slip...), and much of what you're interested in getting done falls within the scope of work I had done there and was happy with in the past. (No experience with mechanical there.) 

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22 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Brooklin Boat Yard has built and launched bigger boats. 

For prices, Maine is cheaper than RI.

They won’t want and can’t handle a 65 foot boat with mast in for anything more than a few days.  

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Masts up on the Chesapeake is pretty common. I would imagine a number of the yards around here could accommodate you. For instance the yard we typically haul our paltry 30 footer at has travel lifts that can haul up to 85 Tons. Some pretty large yachts get hauled there for the winter and their land storage area is huge. It's Herrington Harbor North. Jabins in Annapolis might also be able to haul you out. 

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4 hours ago, eliboat said:

They won’t want and can’t handle a 65 foot boat with mast in for anything more than a few days.  

You're right about that. 

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On 4/25/2020 at 7:25 AM, mgs said:

I’m not sure how Lyman Morse feels about leaving mast up these days, and having the mast in will severely limit getting work done  

The bigger yards in Maine certainly would be good. Lyman Morse, Front Street

also could go with Great Island Boatyard, Hodgdon Yacht Services, Maine Yacht Center. 
 

 

 

after the vesper incident I highly doubt lyman morse would let you leave the mast up. 

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lyman morse, front street, hodgdon and hinckey would be at the top of my list for yards if you plan on having someone else do the work. if you want to do your own work royal river boatayrd in yarmouth would be my first choice. I don't think maine yacht center could take a boat that big and I would stay far the fuck away from portland yacht services. 

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20 minutes ago, frozenhawaiian said:

lyman morse, front street, hodgdon and hinckey would be at the top of my list for yards if you plan on having someone else do the work. if you want to do your own work royal river boatayrd in yarmouth would be my first choice. I don't think maine yacht center could take a boat that big and I would stay far the fuck away from portland yacht services. 

MYC can haul American Promise and  a Swan 59, can’t be too far off from the OP boat

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On 4/26/2020 at 11:00 AM, Slick470 said:

Masts up on the Chesapeake is pretty common. I would imagine a number of the yards around here could accommodate you. For instance the yard we typically haul our paltry 30 footer at has travel lifts that can haul up to 85 Tons. Some pretty large yachts get hauled there for the winter and their land storage area is huge. It's Herrington Harbor North. Jabins in Annapolis might also be able to haul you out. 

True. There are plenty of boats around here decades old that have NEVER had the mast out.

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On 4/26/2020 at 11:00 AM, Slick470 said:

Masts up on the Chesapeake is pretty common. I would imagine a number of the yards around here could accommodate you. For instance the yard we typically haul our paltry 30 footer at has travel lifts that can haul up to 85 Tons. Some pretty large yachts get hauled there for the winter and their land storage area is huge. It's Herrington Harbor North. Jabins in Annapolis might also be able to haul you out. 

I like Herrington North, they certainly have the capacity to pull some big boats, and there are some top caliber shops there, like Osprey Composites.  Really spacious yard, power & water nearby, and a nice marina.  However - the water is a bit skinny getting in there.  Depending on the breeze and tide, it can be an adventure with my J/35 (7' draft).  You'd probably want to speak with them about the draft and timing of getting in there w/r/t tides, wind, etc.  Jabin's in Annapolis handles a lot of big boys and it would be hard to find a yard that is more sailboat friendly / savvy.       

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On 4/28/2020 at 9:07 AM, mgs said:

MYC can haul American Promise and  a Swan 59, can’t be too far off from the OP boat

 

huh, for some reason I thought they couldn't haul boats that big, I stand corrected. 

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More in the middle Bay and much cheaper than Annapolis is Solomon’s.  Mast up is standard here  

Zanheizers can take 10’ draft but has limited dry storage and gets tight during the winter. Last time I talked to them, they discouraged DIY work but that may have changed. They lost a 60’ max LOA for dry storage but might entertain a call. For yard services, they are first rate. 
 

Washburn’s is DIY friendly and can probably handle your boat.  Plenty of dry storage.   Lots of systems tech providers.  Big yard for large motor yachts/trawlers. 
 

Spring Cove is questionable on draft/travel lift so you would have to talk to them. Hit or miss over the years. Blocked me in 4 days before a scheduled launch in one spring with a short haul that turned into a month stay.  Would not move the offending boat unless “somebody pays us to move and rebooting it”.   Pulled my mast (62’ extrusion) for rewiring and other maintenance a few season’s back. They brought in a tree service crane with a useless operator. Coming out was not bad. Stepping it was a 3.5 hour near disaster. To their credit, they charged me for the time it should have taken but......  I guess you could say I don’t recommend them but they allow DIY. 

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A few posters mentioned NEB yard in Rhode Island and right beside it is Hinckleys yard.  Both handle 60 + footers all the time.  Both are expensive but if you want storage only you will come out of it OK.  The East side of RI has tradesmen for every boat job there is.

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Good suggestions here. You could also check out Brewer's (now Safe Harbor) Pilot's Point - size and draft would be no issue at all, and the work they do is top-notch. They did the repair work after Gemini's encounter with ledge last year, and it's 100%. At 61' Joli would not look "large" in the yard over the winter.

 

https://www.byy.com/marina_services_page/pilots_point_yard_services/

 

We berth there over the summers (usually) so please feel free to IM any time.

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Rybovich and the strangely named “Cracker Boy” In Riviera Beach both seem to have a large number of large and very large sailing yachts all the way through the Summer. COVID19 restriction free....it’s Floriduh. 

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I am in contract to buy an older boat near Newport this week and I live near Stamford.  She needs TLC and some upgrades.  

Where are the top shops for B&G electronics? Want to replace 10 year old Furuno unit and update wind/speed/depth and have a top autopilot   

Who do you recommend for new bimini and dodger canvas? 

 

And who do you recommend for rigging?   Want to run reefing lines to the cockpit and possibly move some winches as well  

 

Plan to do minor work now and a bigger refit in September-October. 

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On 4/29/2020 at 9:18 PM, Whits End said:

Thunderbolt, Savannah Ga

My brother had a major refit on his large Perini there and was very pleased. A little off the beaten track, but that can be a good thing.

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6 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

I am in contract to buy an older boat near Newport this week and I live near Stamford.  She needs TLC and some upgrades.  

Where are the top shops for B&G electronics? Want to replace 10 year old Furuno unit and update wind/speed/depth and have a top autopilot   

Who do you recommend for new bimini and dodger canvas? 

 

And who do you recommend for rigging?   Want to run reefing lines to the cockpit and possibly move some winches as well  

 

Plan to do minor work now and a bigger refit in September-October. 

Can’t speak to the rest of it, but for the Bimini and dodger I’d talk to Thurston Canvas in Bristol RI.  The Bimini/dodger setup they installed on my Sabre still looks great after 15 years and even the boat cover has still held up with a few patch jobs. Very easy guys to work with.

http://www.thurstonsails.com/canvas_index.html

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For the electronics, give a call to:

 

Steve Gill

Custom Navigation

sggill@gmail.com

+18603995512

 

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On 5/30/2020 at 4:10 AM, Student_Driver said:

I am in contract to buy an older boat near Newport this week and I live near Stamford.  She needs TLC and some upgrades.  

Where are the top shops for B&G electronics? Want to replace 10 year old Furuno unit and update wind/speed/depth and have a top autopilot   

Who do you recommend for new bimini and dodger canvas? 

 

And who do you recommend for rigging?   Want to run reefing lines to the cockpit and possibly move some winches as well  

  

Plan to do minor work now and a bigger refit in September-October. 

+1 on the Steve Gill recc. below. He's a B&G wizard and has really great customer service. Was super helpful with an AIS antenna issue at the last minute before a weather window delivery a few weeks ago. 

22 minutes ago, RedRyder said:

For the electronics, give a call to:

 

Steve Gill

Custom Navigation

sggill@gmail.com

+18603995512

 

 

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The two happiest days for a boat owner. The Day you buy a boat and the day you sell it. I'm an insurance binder away from acquiring a project boat and having one of those two best days tomorrow.

After that the headaches will begin.

I undertook a project as a way to get to know the boat intimately and be involved in decisions related to the engineering of systems as it gets refit. I'd like to take a few months to participate in the work and learn as I go along.

It's a 35 year old aluminum doppelgänger  of a Little Harbor aft cockpit sloop. Designed by D Empacher. Lovely lines. Great, strong hull, ocean tested and with simple systems. Going to have to do a lot of work under the floorboards. One fuel tank needs replacement or repair and the plumbing is in need or renewal. Am excited though. .

I'm not sure if the systems and auxiliary will be in condition to allow me to use her immediately or after a period of service. TBD. She's been on the hard for several years. Previous owners were a retired couple who sailed over a dozen years cruising North Atlantic Eastern Seaboard, the Caribbean, South America, Central America and Europe. I think with some work she'll be a great ride but it's going to be hundreds of hours of labor to clean her up and modernize where needed.

She's heavy and probably has a moderate SA/D and has a centerboard. Encapsulated ballast (40% of D) Bahamas friendly but not going to tack upwind inside of 90 degrees or anywhere close. I'm not planing to race and I believe in motor sailing when headed upwind on a cruise. 

The inside of the hull was painted and there is some minor flaking to clean up as well as the grim of many years of use. There are original B&G instruments from the mid-80s which ought to be collectors items. I'm sure that I'll have lot's of questions and some of you have already been helpful. If there is interest, I could update this forum on work done, LMK.

Look forward to seeing some Anarchist on the water soon. Name TBA but have some favorites. 

 

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Someone had to explain the crank on the antenna platform to me. Embarrassing. 

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12 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

She’s mine now.  Gulp.  

Excellent. We look forward to you demonstrating your welding skills. :)

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Sail Magazine Article on Indigo

 

Throwing away the previous owner’s soft goods, past dated fluids, excess inventory of parts.  Cleaning teak.  Figuring out whether the auxiliary works and evaluating the batteries.  She’s been on the hard under a cover for several years.  

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1 hour ago, Student_Driver said:

6F5596A0-A7E5-4124-A9D6-522CDA3CEB31.jpeg

Looks like the batteries are probably bonded to the aluminum grid somewhere.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joking.

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Wow !  Big project.  If you can finish by new year you will have done well.

For starters those fuel lines have had it and will need to be replaced.  Boats actually age more when they sit than when they are used.  Without regular use all of the hoses turn dry and brittle then the first time you load them up they fracture and start to leak.  I would replace all of the PVC water hoses as well.

I went through this routine a few years ago.

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Ishmael.  The batteries are bolted down.  They are huge.   I might have to cut away some of those cross supports for the floor boards.  
 

i opened all of the storage compartments.  It could take weeks to sort through it all.  The previous owner had every spare, fluid, oil, furl, bulb, motor, pump, grill parts, standing rigging wires, fittings, blocks, electric components, wires, gaskets, motors, sealers, paints, etc etc.  I even found a brand new 2.4ghz wireless headset pair. 

This  boat could survive a zombie apocalypse and have every repair part onboard.   The question is what do I do with 700 lbs of spare parts.  My first inclination is to get a storage POD and some plastic container boxes and offload virtually everything to sort it on dry land.   I suspect that many of the fluids are beyond their useful lifespan.  TBD.  Not only do I need to sort the inventory, I need to repackage out of old, dusty and dirty bags and boxes into clean new containers.  This will also allow me to clean as much of the bilge and inside lockers etc. 
 

I know that the plumbing needs to be done and there are other urgent upgrades and repairs needed. For example, a high voltage Heart fuse is missing and bypassed.  
 

If possible, I’d like to do the least amount of work in order to ensure that she’s safe and the auxiliary is reliable in the next few weeks to be able to sail around LIS and the Cape etc till Labor Day and then take her out for some big jobs.  
 

Ideally, I could find someplace on the Eastern Seaboard above Cape Hatteras to do a refit but be able to pay a lower labor rate than CT or RI.  Much of what needs to be done is going to be labor intensive like replacing pluming and/or wiring and interior refurbishment.  
 

In an ideal world, i’d do some work on the interior layout.  In particular, I’d like an Naval Architect to opine on adding a hard dodger (bring reef lines to the cockpit) and converting the Starboard quarter-berth into a workshop, storage area for parts and engine access.  In effect create an engine room and separate compartment while removing the berth to add storage space, equipment space and better engine access.  Both shower enclosures were built too small to move about in with the doors closed.  Need a solution.  Lastly, I don’t understand the purpose of the forward companionway and its position near the traveller seems unsafe.  
 

if i can possibly afford it, or at a later date, I’d like to perform updates on the electric system: layout, equipment, storage, control, monitoring and the possible installment of a small genset ( none onboard now.)

She’s a wonderful boat and I stole it. No one wants a project but I have time and a deep interest in learning more about boat systems engineering, functions, maintenance requirements and common problems. Etc. 
 

i am deeply humbled by her history  and the deep knowledge her former owners had.  The Sail Magazine article linked above gives a small hint.  
 

i have a lot of work to do and even more to learn.  
 

For the short term the biggest unknowns are the state of the Perkins and that of the AGM’s. They showed 9.35V before charging.  The Xantrax 2000 (sic?) does not seem to pass a charge so we’re not sure how they will do once we can get the battery charging control to work.  The previous owner suggested that there’s a small fuse in the X2000 that needs replacement.  
 

I am going to reach out to the former owner this week to get a download of info.  I’ve heard that he’s willing to help.  He was living on the boat with his wife till he was 76.  I can imagine that they have amazing memories. 
 

That’s it for now.  LMK if you care to hear more or to stop the updates.  
 

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First.  Instead of a POD, consider a storage room the size of a small garage. Take everything off and you’ll need a place to sort it. Take care not to shortcut “just for this season.”  Easy to get excited about getting on the water, but money into a temp fix is money wasted. Get a qualified mechanic to resurrect the engine. Diesels are amazingly tolerant of abuse and neglect but you get one chance for the first start after a long layup that probably had no preservation done.  

Unless the interior is completely trashed, a configuration change is a big mod. 

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26 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

First.  Instead of a POD, consider a storage room the size of a small garage. Take everything off and you’ll need a place to sort it. Take care not to shortcut “just for this season.”  Easy to get excited about getting on the water, but money into a temp fix is money wasted. Get a qualified mechanic to resurrect the engine. Diesels are amazingly tolerant of abuse and neglect but you get one chance for the first start after a long layup that probably had no preservation done.  

Unless the interior is completely trashed, a configuration change is a big mod. 

Agree, leave it alone and trust the experience of the PO, it’s a custom design and over time you might appreciate some of those quirks.

I am a year down the road with V40 no 101, a similar project, and we have come to realise that we are doing a restoration, not a rebuild.

For example, a lot of those electronics are repairable, unlike modern stuff, and it’s easy to set up a wifi network with new gear you want to be integrated. Redundancy is king..

Do you have several autopilot options? If not, rebuild the autopilot once the engine and charging systems work...

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You could haul it out and bring it Brownell boat storage it's a do it yourself storage yard and hire whoever you want to do the work and a self storage place to for your stuff

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2 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Ishmael.  The batteries are bolted down.  They are huge.   I might have to cut away some of those cross supports for the floor boards.  
 

i opened all of the storage compartments.  It could take weeks to sort through it all.  The previous owner had every spare, fluid, oil, furl, bulb, motor, pump, grill parts, standing rigging wires, fittings, blocks, electric components, wires, gaskets, motors, sealers, paints, etc etc.  I even found a brand new 2.4ghz wireless headset pair. 

This  boat could survive a zombie apocalypse and have every repair part onboard.   The question is what do I do with 700 lbs of spare parts.  My first inclination is to get a storage POD and some plastic container boxes and offload virtually everything to sort it on dry land.   I suspect that many of the fluids are beyond their useful lifespan.  TBD.  Not only do I need to sort the inventory, I need to repackage out of old, dusty and dirty bags and boxes into clean new containers.  This will also allow me to clean as much of the bilge and inside lockers etc. 
 

I know that the plumbing needs to be done and there are other urgent upgrades and repairs needed. For example, a high voltage Heart fuse is missing and bypassed.  
 

If possible, I’d like to do the least amount of work in order to ensure that she’s safe and the auxiliary is reliable in the next few weeks to be able to sail around LIS and the Cape etc till Labor Day and then take her out for some big jobs.  
 

Ideally, I could find someplace on the Eastern Seaboard above Cape Hatteras to do a refit but be able to pay a lower labor rate than CT or RI.  Much of what needs to be done is going to be labor intensive like replacing pluming and/or wiring and interior refurbishment.  
 

In an ideal world, i’d do some work on the interior layout.  In particular, I’d like an Naval Architect to opine on adding a hard dodger (bring reef lines to the cockpit) and converting the Starboard quarter-berth into a workshop, storage area for parts and engine access.  In effect create an engine room and separate compartment while removing the berth to add storage space, equipment space and better engine access.  Both shower enclosures were built too small to move about in with the doors closed.  Need a solution.  Lastly, I don’t understand the purpose of the forward companionway and its position near the traveller seems unsafe.  
 

if i can possibly afford it, or at a later date, I’d like to perform updates on the electric system: layout, equipment, storage, control, monitoring and the possible installment of a small genset ( none onboard now.)

She’s a wonderful boat and I stole it. No one wants a project but I have time and a deep interest in learning more about boat systems engineering, functions, maintenance requirements and common problems. Etc. 
 

i am deeply humbled by her history  and the deep knowledge her former owners had.  The Sail Magazine article linked above gives a small hint.  
 

i have a lot of work to do and even more to learn.  
 

For the short term the biggest unknowns are the state of the Perkins and that of the AGM’s. They showed 9.35V before charging.  The Xantrax 2000 (sic?) does not seem to pass a charge so we’re not sure how they will do once we can get the battery charging control to work.  The previous owner suggested that there’s a small fuse in the X2000 that needs replacement.  
 

I am going to reach out to the former owner this week to get a download of info.  I’ve heard that he’s willing to help.  He was living on the boat with his wife till he was 76.  I can imagine that they have amazing memories. 
 

That’s it for now.  LMK if you care to hear more or to stop the updates.  
 

I'd like to second what Olaf and IB have said. My boat doesn't have any provenance, so I'm less worried about what it was. When I acquired my boat it was in a similar state and by the time I was done unloading after I bought it, it was several inches higher in the water. Some things that I now recognize as useful ended up in the tip, but even so I still have a very complete set of spares and materials.  I think I'm set for life with Max-prop anodes, but I did chuck a stern light for the Monitor. It look a long time to inventory and understand. 

I think the idea of sailing it while doing the work is a good one. It costs more but helped me figure out how I wanted the boat to run and what I want it ultimately to be. I had/have a lot of ideas, some more grandiose than others, and they evolved as I used the boat. I did have a clear rule of no quick fixes, even if it meant I did less work in any given year, and I attempted to order the work to minimize waste. It kind of went like this: engine skin fittings, drive-train, prop, steering and CB system.  Then chainplates, rigging and deck (rigging was a decent shape). When I did my deck I addressed the basics of my deck gear and running rigging. I had to fix some electrical issues along the way and made further easy upgrades to the rigging like changing my runners to textile.  Some gear like my Xantrex Link2000, the  SSB and VHFs are still chugging away, but much of the rest died. Each Summer I cruised the boat to get a better feel on what to work on next. Unfortunately I meant that I didn't put in a new galley and re-finished the interior until this year - 9 years after purchase- and I still haven't replaced the OE cushions....oops!  When I replaced my mainsail the reaction of the sail loft was as if I gave them some archaeological artifact, "No one's made mainsails like this for 20 years!".  Anyway, I probably spent too much money and did it all wrong. 

It'd be great to follow your re-fit. 

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Only one thing for it.  Remove EVERYTHING from the boat and start again.  Don't throw out any strange gizmos for at least a year or until you find out what they do.  

Start with the fridge because cold beer is vital for the morale of every new owner.  The radiator is bound to be filthy so give it a blast with a hose and fire it up.  Chances are that the coolant pressure will have to be reset.  While you wait for the fridge mechanic to show up head for the bow locker and start there.  The anchor rode has probably rotted.

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Batteries are shot, unfortunately. And it's going to be a headache to get to the four monster AGM batteries below floor support structure and plumbing.  Ugh. Not sure how much prep work the yard is going to let me do themselves. They think that it could be two weeks before they can get to it. In their words, 'any reputable shop will be very busy right now' 

Apparently everyone is delayed in launching and all owners want to get splashed asap. The marina has offered to try to find 3rd party help to do the prep work. I wish I knew who to call but I'm lost. I have to trust the marina for now and do whatever prep work they allow. One friend has suggested that I cut the metal plumbing and then thread them for whale tubing. Sounds sensible if they can't simply be remove at the end fittings. 

NO splash this week and now June seems in jeopardy. 

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3 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Batteries are shot, unfortunately. And it's going to be a headache to get to the four monster AGM batteries below floor support structure and plumbing.  Ugh. Not sure how much prep work the yard is going to let me do themselves. They think that it could be two weeks before they can get to it. In their words, 'any reputable shop will be very busy right now' 

Apparently everyone is delayed in launching and all owners want to get splashed asap. The marina has offered to try to find 3rd party help to do the prep work. I wish I knew who to call but I'm lost. I have to trust the marina for now and do whatever prep work they allow. One friend has suggested that I cut the metal plumbing and then thread them for whale tubing. Sounds sensible if they can't simply be remove at the end fittings. 

NO splash this week and now June seems in jeopardy. 

from what I can gather a lot of yards a really backed up. talking to the yard manager where I've kept my boats for years they a lot of yards didn't anticipate there being much of a boating season this year so this many people all demanding yard services as well as launches has caught a lot of yards flat footed. I've been waiting 2 weeks to have the smaller boat launched and also to have the masts for the big boat moved off the storage racks. 

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Everyone seems to have 2-3 weeks of work.  I’ve been calling around to see if anyone has capacity if I move her. 

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I’ve been quoted 45 hours of labor to take out the old and put in the new batteries.  Wow.  Welcome to yacht ownership.  Starting out with a a five figure repair is a bracing introduction to the wealth destruction boat ownership entails  

I’m going to guess that labor is going to account for 50% of my repair and refurbish bills going forward.  I should learn to fix things asap!

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7 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Everyone seems to have 2-3 weeks of work.  I’ve been calling around to see if anyone has capacity if I move her. 

I may have missed it further up the thread but did you decide on a specific yard to do the work or even a specific region?

 

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9 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Staying at the yard where the boat was stored in Narragansett 

gotcha, again I'd look into the some of the yards here in maine. prices will absolutely be lower than RI. once the rush of launching boats for the season is done I suspect yards will be much more free'd up. looking at the installation of those batteries it kind of amazes me, batteries are good for 7-8 years at best. why would you put them in and then weld frames in over them 

 

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5 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

The frames/beams are designed to be removed with screws. 

45 hours to remove screws? Are they using their teeth? Maybe you could offer to loan them a screwdriver and get it down to 2.

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If you look at the photos above, there’s some plumbing to deal with.  And a little extra overage to get launched soon.  Am not complaining.  I know my role.  Economy supporter.  

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58 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

45 hours to remove screws? Are they using their teeth? Maybe you could offer to loan them a screwdriver and get it down to 2.

That could be optimistically assuming someone actually used anti-seize that last time they were put back in. 

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1 hour ago, Student_Driver said:

My guess is that some screws will

need to be tapped or drilled out. 

I would just assume drilled out and retapped one size larger. I'm lazy as hell, so that's what I would do. And coat them with antisieze before reinstalling.

As to the plumbing, what the hell were they thinking to put that in over the batteries.

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On 6/10/2020 at 12:22 PM, Ishmael said:

45 hours to remove screws? Are they using their teeth? Maybe you could offer to loan them a screwdriver and get it down to 2.

I’m guessing you don’t work on boats professionally. I do. I would probably spend a morning just protecting surrounding surfaces, ladder, companionway etc. from being damaged from moving heavy gear around. Plus work crew and their tools being brought aboard. Pays off in the long run. 

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12 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

I’m guessing you don’t work on boats professionally. I do. I would probably spend a morning just protecting surrounding surfaces, ladder, companionway etc. from being damaged from moving heavy gear around. Plus work crew and their tools being brought aboard. Pays off in the long run. 

That's very true. If you're using a full service yard -a decent number of hours will be for for "protect the boat" and "staging". Parts are almost always the cheap part. 

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1 hour ago, Al Paca said:

I’m guessing you don’t work on boats professionally. I do. I would probably spend a morning just protecting surrounding surfaces, ladder, companionway etc. from being damaged from moving heavy gear around. Plus work crew and their tools being brought aboard. Pays off in the long run. 

ding ding ding, we have a winner. hell a job like that I'd probably be looking at a minimum of an hour lug all my tools, a few extension cords, work lights etc. up onto the boat and get set up before I even picked up a tool to get working on a project. those looks either 4D or 8D batteries, AGM/s that size you're looking at probably 150lbs a piece. my buddy and I dragged 8 old ones off my boat last year and lugged 8 new ones aboard and got them installed. it sucked. 

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I agreed to the hours.  I think it’s fair or close enough. I’m just glad that these guys are nice enough to help me get splashed soon while running at 150% for all their existing clients.  Work has started.  Floor cross beam and plumbing removed. Batteries disconnected.  

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