Joseph Lapp

Foil repair - small chips

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Up here is Duluth, MN (not GA) the weather is not warm enough for foiling (ok not warm enough for me)  but here is plenty of wind so just getting prepped.

Question:  I have several nicks/chips on the rudder foil and was seeking advice on how to proceed to repair.   I have SystemThree Quikfair putty as well Raka epoxy (building a Angus RowCruiser).    

BTW - any UFO Foiler owners in Minnesota or northern Wisconsin?    Would love to get together.

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Not that I've seen? The foils seem to live with the kite crew up here, as you get both seasons out of your "sails". That and the milfoil on inland lakes has scared off the boat racing sailors in the rest of the state. The dingy fleets have been steadily dropping here in the metro, think the people with the money and space don't have the time or drive. Catch 22. 

Wonder if you could flip the UFO rig over to an iceboat for double duty...?

Have you looked around in the other UFO thread? Can probably DM designer himself for an answer. He's super helpful. Almost bought a IC kit from him and was humbled by the enthusiasm. 

 

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There's a big rambunctious UFO thread right on this forum. I think the size of the nicks matter. Putty for small, a bit of glass for larger, angle grinder to sand it all

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I've had a lot of success with Norglass epoxy filler.

It's white and you fill the nick then about 20 mins later the skin has gone firm and you can wet your finger and rub it smooth.

For a nick on the trailing edge I use thumb and forefinger to do the same. 

Result is something you can go sailing with.

No idea if you can get it where King Trump rules 

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What you have will work fine.  The devil is in how well you manage to fair said putty after it sets.  As Martin says, larger nicks you’ll want some reinforcement.  I like to chop fiber and mix it in with my putty for a reinforced patch.  This works well,  it is very difficult to apply, as the fibers turn the mix into a hard to manage gelatinous mess.  With practice you can use this method to great effect. 

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On 4/26/2020 at 8:53 AM, eliboat said:

What you have will work fine.  The devil is in how well you manage to fair said putty after it sets.  As Martin says, larger nicks you’ll want some reinforcement.  I like to chop fiber and mix it in with my putty for a reinforced patch.  This works well,  it is very difficult to apply, as the fibers turn the mix into a hard to manage gelatinous mess.  With practice you can use this method to great effect. 

Keeping the foil shape is really important. Since you're talking about foiling boats, I assume you mean the horizontal lifting foil? I would think it's stiffness and strength/weight and true-ness to foil section are far more important than a conventional rudder blade or centerboard.

I've had good luck trimming fiberglass strands to fit into the nick, wetting them out with resin, placing them with tweezers, then laying low-density putty over the nick. This is both easy to fair and puts some strength back. I have been using 0.4mil plastic (PVC) sheeting to skin over and smooth the wet resin/putty. This is the next step up from the old wax-paper trick. It's easy to work out air bubbles and smooth over the surface so it needs little sanding when cured.

FB- Doug

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quick and easy run through a few examples: http://www.sail.ie/maint.htm

One handy trick is to use some rigid former on trailing edges to minimise sanding. Something like a couple of pieces of board clamped together, either with sheets of mylar under them, or packing tape on them.

 

Same can be done on foil leading edges by using mylar sheet wrapped to the shape of the leading edge, held down with tape.

 

The bigger the damage, the more substantial goop (epoxy vs. gelcoat, for example), prep-grinding and fibre filler you'll need.

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