Kris Cringle

My sons $1 dollar boat gets a re-fit.

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I sprung for the dollar 5 years ago while he was still getting his degree in Rome. SKAL was the typical $1 boat. For sale for a few K but no takers. Price went down then the PO bought another boat and realized, he had a liability on his hands. 

 

Our son and friends sailed the dickens out of it during summer breaks. Nothing was done to it, just sailed. He named it NAMO as he's fluent in Italian from his studies, but the name never stuck like the vinyl SKAL that's still there. 

tt-namo-2018-jpeg.178082

Oh yeah, SKAL is an O'Day Outlaw from the 60's. A Philip Rhodes design. 

 

Last season, our son was full into a real job in finance in Boston. We decided not to launch SKAL as he'd have no time to use it. SKAL, after the spring boatyard shuffle, ended up in the dreaded 'back row' 

 

Everybody knows, when a boat gets to the back row, it rarely ever comes out,...at least not in one piece. SKAL is the weathered coaming in the foreground. 

 

skal-in-hospice_-jpg.178221

Enter the great Pandemic of 2020. Young Tom is working remotely, on full salary, and living across the street from us in Maine. He and good friend Harry, also a life long sailor, think SKAL needs a bit of work as it may get some use this season. Harry was part of the scrapping crew last weekend in the boatyard less than 2 miles down the road. 

 

skal-refit-2020-jpeg.178085

 

Tom and Harry go way back: 

 

harry-tt-potato-gun-size-jpg.178083

 

A nasty little boat inside, SKAL, a great sailor has some serious faults besides peeling paint. It's greatest fault is how much rainwater gets below. In fact - and it's a bit of a mystery why - a rainfall of 1 to 2" will threaten to sink the boat (I've pumped it enough times). But never mind that, the boys are more concerned with aesthetics. 

 

While Harry and help scrapped below, Harry's girlfriend who works with her sister in her fathers copper roofing and fabricating biz, took to stripping and sanding the sole which is often afloat in the cabin. She is the only pro on the project. 

 

harry-and-crew-in-boatyard-jpeg.178141

 

They picked up some acrylic from Home Cheapo for new ports. They've be overlayed on the old openings. While the yard crew worked Tom cut these out. I don't offer too much advice. Dad advice can bog you down and is usually more than you need (I was a son once). But I dropped everything and made cuts on the table saw while he cut on the bandsaw. An old tape container filled with screws was the perfect radius for the corners. 

 

tt-drawing-ports-jpg.178139

 

I got swept up in the enthusiasm and committed myself to solving the sinking mystery. SKAL has an 8 foot cockpit. As well as party all your friends across the bay, it's a large rain catchment area. Plus the bench seats are canted down - aft, which collects tons of rain. There is a formed gutter at the base of the coamings.  

skal-cockpit-1-of-1-jpg.178238

 

See the drains, 2 black specs?

 

cockpipt-scupper_-jpg.178239

 

Here's my theory: Once the black specs clog (2 hairs and a piece of beer bottle label), the rain collects on the benches. It finds the gutter around the 2 seat lockers. Because the gutters are not deep enough, the rain water collects on the back of the gutters. 

Fair enough, O'Day put another black spec sized hole to drain it away. 

locker-lid-drain-and-scupper-jpg.178240

 

So that one clogs too, no doubt. Even if it doesn't a substantial rain will overwhelm these drains. What happens when those clog? I deduce, the rain simply finds the lowest point around the seat gutter, and cascades over the gutter and into the boat below. A good rain will have the sole boards floating and you pumping for a solid 10 minutes with the smaller whale gusher bilge pump. 

 

Rhodes designed a nice stack to drain the side decks. I wonder if he had a better idea but the builder did their own design? After the first season, I advised my son to replace the tiny hoses. Maybe that helped but the problem persists. 

 

deck-scupper-plumbing-below-crop-jpg.178

 

My plan is to re-plumb the cockpit drains to the next size, 2X if I can fit something in the gutters. We'll see. This 're-fit' will not have dramatic before and after pictures. There is little hope for a $1 dollar boat, I'm afraid.

The primary reason for me is to keep SKAL servicable and floating so that it may be passed on to another 'kid'. 

We all know (and I'm afraid my son and Harry know this as well), you're just around the corner from the next $1 dollar boat these days. And it will be bigger and better. 

It's a great sailing little boat. It just lacks a following like a Pearson Ensign or similar, that it is doubtful a passionate owner will be found and a full restoration will ever happen. But we can hope. 

2124352780_Skalsailing3kntsinlightair(1of1).thumb.jpg.5070f0f9122375fd84694d4469ba0804.jpg

 

 

 

 

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if it is clean enough to use without getting sick, it doesn't sink and it sails well...it's restored just right!

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@Kris Cringle  Ah, I just caught the potato cannon in the photo! I have one of those and I use it every year during our autumn "man cruise."

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Back in the day, I owned the prototype of the Rhodes-designed O'Day Tempest class. The cockpit had a drain at the forward end of the cockpit. The water level in the drain was about 1/2 inch below the cockpit sole. Bouncing a little in calm conditions, it would pump water inches deep in the cockpit. (I bought a big rubber stopper from the chem dept at Brown.) So don't assume anything about a proper safety margin in the drainage system.

Interesting  note, the actual drain fitting was a lavatory sink drain. No seacock. 

The family I bought the boat from had moved up to an Outlaw.

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@Kris Cringle Wonderful project & story.

My H-Boat had a similar problem with the drains for the cockpit locker lids. Fortunately, the diameter is bigger, and once I cleared the clog the problem went away. The amount of water getting below was never more than a small nuisance.

The Outlaw is a pretty boat. Please give us updates!

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Nice story. An O'Day Outlaw was my introduction to crewing in sailboat races back in the mid 70's. And I've never looked back. Enjoy the boat.

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O'Day Outlaw...much like the Pearson Commander....

Photo13A-Outlaw-500.jpg

 

attachment.php?s=71b9c0283f0c03b24d480aa

 

model_outlaw_pic_1_640w_480h.jpg

 

What the hell, man!!  Looks like a load of fun to me. I'd restore that!

 

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10 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

deck-scupper-plumbing-below-crop-jpg.178

 

My plan is to re-plumb the cockpit drains to the next size, 2X if I can fit something in the gutters. We'll see. This 're-fit' will not have dramatic before and after pictures. There is little hope for a $1 dollar boat, I'm afraid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is that some sort of "downspout" on the inside of the hull where the hose attaches? If so, best drain upgrade would be a piece of GRP tubing (1" OD?) biggest that will fit between underside of deck & bottom of gutter. If tube is below bottom of gutter a bit that's better. Glass the tube in from the inside, fill & gel coat joint on the outside. Biggest drain possible and will never need repairing again.

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@Kris Cringle The drains from my cockpit locker lids (kind of a mouthful) drain into the cockpit, and then into the cockpit drain though hulls.

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What keeps the potato from falling past the reducer?

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28 minutes ago, 4ktsb said:

What keeps the potato from falling past the reducer?

That's always a problem.

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13 hours ago, longy said:

Is that some sort of "downspout" on the inside of the hull where the hose attaches? If so, best drain upgrade would be a piece of GRP tubing (1" OD?) biggest that will fit between underside of deck & bottom of gutter. If tube is below bottom of gutter a bit that's better. Glass the tube in from the inside, fill & gel coat joint on the outside. Biggest drain possible and will never need repairing again.

The 'downspout' is nothing more than a 1/2" hose barb/threaded adaptor that was installed originally. 

 

My plan is to try fitting the same in 3/4" by using G/Flex for a mechanical bond. I'm thinking in the limited space I might be able to form a shoulder the mechanically fasten the fitting in. I'll even consider a 1" but I doubt the space in the gutters is there. 

 

Your idea is superior but the space, especially from above in the gutters, is limited. If the above idea fails, yours can still be tried. Where a good source for GRP pipe that could be used for a standard hose fit? 

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Don't use any hose - run the pipe uninterrupted. I was asking about the fiberglass knee?/ thing that the hose goes into

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Yeah, seems very odd to me that the hose plumbs into that knee, or whatever it is.  It wouldn't be too tough to set it up like Bull's H boat....some hose from there to a little fitting  a couple inches above the cockpit sole.

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27 minutes ago, longy said:

Don't use any hose - run the pipe uninterrupted. I was asking about the fiberglass knee?/ thing that the hose goes into

Ok. That thing is the deck drain. Typical 60's fiberglass boat feature; deck drain (see the bronze plate strainer drain outside the coaming?).

1390485182_SKALdeckdrain_.thumb.jpg.0acacfa5ba50c272139a42e37b25169f.jpg

They were built into the hull after to fit a drain grate above, in the low spot of the decks. They drain to just below the waterline so there is no stain on the topsides (like a cut out scupper in a toe rail). Your idea is great! I'd do it except the small drain in the gutter for the locker lid is aft a foot or so. They T'ed the hose from that drain into the hose you see (it's in back). 

 

That one would be tough to glass in I'm afraid. A hose may be the only option (but I'm all ears). 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Alan H said:

Yeah, seems very odd to me that the hose plumbs into that knee, or whatever it is.  It wouldn't be too tough to set it up like Bull's H boat....some hose from there to a little fitting  a couple inches above the cockpit sole.

It looks like a knee but in fact it's a hollow drain 'stack' I have 4 in my 61 Alden. Those drain the decks from 4 different deck drains. Plus they have a similar pipe tapped in that connect to small drains in the cockpit seat. Those drain spray away that would collect under your can when sailing. 

 

Here's Alden's drawing from 1959 showing a cross section of the GRP detail: 

 

752696368_949Scupperdetail2.jpg.36f1a5b26e4a9209c981d162d1ae26ff.jpg

 

 

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OK, that shelf is in the way. McMaster has a good selection of G-10 tubing, 1/8" thick wall should be enuff to hold up under a hose clamp. 3/4" ID should be enuff to handle run off. Glass in short stubs to underside of gutter & drain stack (below shelf) have the two stubs pointing at each other. Connect with 1" hose. If that aft drain works as is, leave it as single hose where it injects into stack.

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The weekend re-fit goes on at pandemic distance: It was the first warm enough day to work comfortably outside. My contribution was to glue down some peeling veneer on the sole. 

refit-2020-crew-set-up-outside_-jpg.1784

They are on a mission each taking a self-appointed task. I've raised 2 millenials and co-raised countless others over the years. It's a joy to watch young people work, produce, on their own. This generation is different but completely capable. It's too soon to tell how they will change the world, but they will. 

 

The old finish on these bunk fiddles didn't stand a chance against these strong arms. 

 

refit-2020-hand-sanding-edith-jpg.178496

 

I could see Edith was anxious to dip a brush in the varnish. She said, with a smile, as she brushed on the first coat, "This is so satisfying"

 

But then she knew it would be, this was not her first time with sandpaper and a paintbrush. 

 

refit-2020-first-coat-so-satisfying-_-jp

 

 

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On 4/30/2020 at 8:42 PM, 4ktsb said:

What keeps the potato from falling past the reducer?

Friction fit and the proper length tamping rod.

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

 

The old finish on these bunk fiddles didn't stand a chance against these strong arms. 

 

refit-2020-hand-sanding-edith-jpg.178496

 

I could see Edith was anxious to dip a brush in the varnish. She said, with a smile, as she brushed on the first coat, "This is so satisfying"

 

But then she knew it would be, this was not her first time with sandpaper and a paintbrush. 

 

When my wife was 40 she could do 12 pull-ups, that's pretty much what her arms and shoulders looked like. Then we had another kid.....

While your kids are doing something useful, that son we had in our 40's is doing stuff like this (when he's not writing algorithms to test banking software for security holes).

 

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6 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

refit-2020-crew-set-up-outside_-jpg.1784

 It's too soon to tell how they will change the world, but they will.

And when they get to our age the younger generations will blame them for everything that is wrong with the world. :D

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20 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

And when they get to our age the younger generations will blame them for everything that is wrong with the world. :D

You bet!   Their kids will sure look at this photo with wonder.  What in the heck are mom and dad doing?  Labor?  Where is the remote and controller?  

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A girlfriend that works on the boat; sands, saws and varnishes?

Keep her!

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6 hours ago, Alan H said:

A girlfriend that works on the boat; sands, saws and varnishes?

Keep her!

And introduce me to her sister.

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

And introduce me to her sister.

I'm not sure Mrs. B would approve. If she does, I'd like to meet her.

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Do you tell Mrs Ish everything? :D

Besides, she'd only be "boatyard crew". ;)

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Working on a hard-to-love boat, is drudgery. You need a series of rewards - no matter how small - to make it to a finish line. First time anyone ever saw anything, through these ports. 

 

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@Kris Cringle I *totally* agree with that philosophy. It's one reason why all my repairs and restorations take so long.

I'm not a "pure fettler" like the Samson guy, nor am I a "pure sailor" like Dylan.  I enjoy the satisfaction of a repair well done but I sure do like to enjoy the fruits of my labor by going sailing.

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On 4/30/2020 at 8:35 AM, Kris Cringle said:

skal-in-hospice_-jpg.178221

Kris, great thread.  Reminds me of my daughter and her boyfriend  having a blast on a $600 CAD (close enough to $1) tanzer 22.

At the risk of derailing the thread, I have to ask about the Island Packet in the pic above?  Did someone really add an aft cabin?

That's got to be an illusion but I can't tell.

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2 hours ago, py26129 said:

Kris, great thread.  Reminds me of my daughter and her boyfriend  having a blast on a $600 CAD (close enough to $1) tanzer 22.

At the risk of derailing the thread, I have to ask about the Island Packet in the pic above?  Did someone really add an aft cabin?

That's got to be an illusion but I can't tell.

Good eye, I was struck by the sight of the IP in the 'back lot'.

I saw that boat about 10 years ago and even took some pictures as it was unusual. I think there was some media about this 'customizing'.

 I believe it was stretched and either a few feet were added to the stern, or it was cut aft somewhere and a filler section glassed in. I think it was professionally done and looked it at the time. 

I'm not sure what was added below as I didn't get aboard. I'm guessing or recalling it may have had two berths with footwell under the cockpit. Could be a couple stiffs below, it's been sitting for a few years. 

 

In hindsight, was this 'customizing' a good idea? Apparently not as it's now in the 'back row' of this local yard.   

 

 

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8 hours ago, Ajax said:

@Kris Cringle I *totally* agree with that philosophy. It's one reason why all my repairs and restorations take so long.

I'm not a "pure fettler" like the Samson guy, nor am I a "pure sailor" like Dylan.  I enjoy the satisfaction of a repair well done but I sure do like to enjoy the fruits of my labor by going sailing.

I'm with you. My boat is high maintenance but it sails every season. I could never own a project boat that spent even one season on the hard, due to projects. The boat is a means to a more important end, being on the water. 

 

I think my son has even less interest in any work beyond making this boat a little more fun to sail. I'm good with that. He's learning a ton his way. 

 

I believe denial is a great tool for builders, makers, doers or DIY boat owners. I don't allow myself to dwell much beyond pounding the next nail. 

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9 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Working on a hard-to-love boat, is drudgery.

Kris, with all respect, I don't think that an O'Day Outlaw is a hard-to-love boat.

image.png.967fe7da4c89415531a03a624ecbd6ea.png

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3 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Good eye, I was struck by the sight of the IP in the 'back lot'.

I saw that boat about 10 years ago and even took some pictures as it was unusual. I think there was some media about this 'customizing'.

 I believe it was stretched and either a few feet were added to the stern, or it was cut aft somewhere and a filler section glassed in. I think it was professionally done and looked it at the time. 

I'm not sure what was added below as I didn't get aboard. I'm guessing or recalling it may have had two berths with footwell under the cockpit. Could be a couple stiffs below, it's been sitting for a few years. 

In hindsight, was this 'customizing' a good idea? Apparently not as it's now in the 'back row' of this local yard.  

I've seen worse.

https://www.usedvictoria.com/classified-ad/Pacific-30_35667170

image.thumb.png.2913d204820f5799696bd3434d76eafc.png

This is what it's supposed to look like

image.png.b0c3dfd26d51e1c504aa3aafb1f83a1a.png

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48 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I've seen worse.

Most unfortunate. There must be a minimum length for aft cabins - well over 30 feet, I think. Although, my 27-foot H-Boat has a huge lazarette. It could be an "aft cabin" for 2 or 3 grandchildren.

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

Most unfortunate. There must be a minimum length for aft cabins - well over 30 feet, I think.

Nonsense - 26' is plenty.

image.png.91d4c748e3d8b412a299c744ecf869a6.png

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13 hours ago, Bull City said:
 
 
 
 
13 hours ago, Bull City said:

Kris, with all respect, I don't think that an O'Day Outlaw is a hard-to-love boat.

image.png.967fe7da4c89415531a03a624ecbd6ea.png

It shouldn't be a hard to love boat,  bull.

I think the design is near perfect for our typical use. But that huge locker you see aft fills with 30-50 or more gallons of rainwater during a 1" summer storm. Everything in it is soaked and in fact, awash. And then as you head below, you see the cabin sole floating, and yes,...the battery top is below the slosh. Those are problems that I believe may have been exacerbated by the builder. 

 

A good boat if nothing else should stay reasonably dry at mooring and provide basic shelter, like the roof on your house. I think once we have that, it may be an easier boat to love.

THEN it may take on a different status. I hope so, it could be a great restoration for someone who wants a beautiful daysailer for pennies to the dollar compared to what is custom designed and built today. 

 

I took this photo some years before we aquirred SKAL. I was out on my boat after a good rainstorm. The boatyard was checking boats when I noticed they tied up to SKAL. You can see from her bow skyward attitude, she's taken a couple hundred pounds of rain in that aft locker. The yard pumped her out. To this day, that previous owner never knew why the boat would start sinking during some conditions and not others. He now owns a beautifully restored and maintained Alburg 30. A furniture craftsmen, he's all thumbs on a boat. 

884468972_SKALsinkingin2008.thumb.jpg.60a7c709d6205044923b9bd37b459092.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

A good boat if nothing else should stay reasonably dry at mooring and provide basic shelter, like the roof on your house. I think once we have that, it may be an easier boat to love.

THEN it may take on a different status. I hope so, it could be a great restoration for someone who wants a beautiful daysailer for pennies to the dollar compared to what is custom designed and built today. 

Kris, I see your point. Makes perfect sense. 

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It might be wise to completely re-think those drains, then. I mean, if the little drains as designed really do not work, then making them bigger will help, but still....

You could double the size of the holes in those cockpit locker rims and direct the tubing into 1-inch fittings that drain into the cockpit, and it wouldn't cost much.

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5 hours ago, Alan H said:

You could double the size of the holes in those cockpit locker rims and direct the tubing into 1-inch fittings that drain into the cockpit, and it wouldn't cost much.

As Alan H knows, on an H-Boat, the drains on the cockpit locker rims work that way (drain into the cockpit) and it works fine. 

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11 hours ago, Reflex Sailor said:

I think the Fairey Atlanta did a pretty good aft cabin within 26 feet in the 1950s.

I don't think that boat did anything "pretty good".

On the short list for Ugliest Boat Ever Made.

image.png.0fcc0e7003e1eb873d593ecc10c1c141.png

It does get strong competition from our very own local similar but different ZOTL.

 

ZOTL.jpg

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On 5/7/2020 at 9:49 PM, SloopJonB said:

Nonsense - 26' is plenty.

image.png.91d4c748e3d8b412a299c744ecf869a6.png

WTF? That is just wrong!

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On 5/7/2020 at 8:48 PM, Bull City said:

Most unfortunate. There must be a minimum length for aft cabins - well over 30 feet, I think. Although, my 27-foot H-Boat has a huge lazarette. It could be an "aft cabin" for 2 or 3 grandchildren.

I have a brochure somewhere for an 18 ft center cockpit boat. French, I think. I wouldn't say aft-cabin since it's all open down below.

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Once you get below a certain size, center cockpit boats get a bit silly. The S2 9.2C (I think that was the one) was ugly. Didn't know it had an uglier cousin.

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The real problem is that with S2 build quality those beastly MoFo's are going to be around for a long time. :o

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Why is it, young men make decisions as if this is the last day on Earth (and old men move as if they have all the time in the world)?

My son mentioned earlier this week that they had scheduled a Thursday trailer/launch. That's today! 

I sprung into action and got serious on the sinking by rainfall, problem. Some great ideas were born here (fiberglass tubes #1).

Due to the pandemic (our local chandlery is closed for browsing/thinking) I had to use our 2 local hardware and supplies for parts, Tuesday and Wednesday. So I apologize for the lack of marine parts. And this is total Fettler work. :)

Sure enough, all the tiny fittings deck drain parts I cut out were stuffed with grad-doo.
 

drains-old-plumbing-stuffed-jpg.179082

 

Goal: Enlarge the deck drains. First, bigger holes.

 

drains-new-hole-in-gutter-jpg.179083

 


The Achilles heel of my plan was adhering plastic hose barbs to fiberglass. Research showed a few things can help, abrading, heat, but the bonds would be at best mechanical. I did discover that instead of trying to fit a threaded adaptor (as was done at O'day), the actual hose barb end would give more of a mechanical lock because the steps are deeper and they have a 'barb' design that make them difficult to pull out of hose, which would help in my epoxy bond.

My only best choice (at the hardware) was JBL epoxy which touted plastic adhesion. The good thing is this stuff is thick. My custom-cut fittings were a little loose (by design) to hopefully allow a good ring of epoxy bonding to the fresh fiberglass from the new hole and roughing up the old glass for a filet shoulder.

After a day the fittings appear up to the task (but I told the boys, don't kick them!). They shaped into the gutters well enough:

drain-in-main-gutter-jpg.179088

Most important was to get good, smooth, short, plumbing runs. Plus I eliminated the T fitting where the aft drain originally plumbed in. Yep, this is the best I could do head first into the quarter berths. I know, not proper hose but will suffice for now as these drains are above the waterline. Plus we can monitor to see if they're clogged. Now they are easy to snake with a wire.

drains-hose-connection-stack-2-jpg.17908

For the aft drain, I closed up the 3/8" copper stubs and put new, larger drains aft which is the low spot were rain/spray collect when the boat is on it's lines. Instead of leading these forward to an impossible T connection, I lead the new hose thru a new hole in the bulkhead to the OB compartment. That of course, drains overboard.

drain-aft-thru-bulkhead-jpg.179090

I've done my pandemic, best.

 

image.gif

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@Kris Cringle it's great for a rush job. The bottom line is, the drains (no matter the size) will need to be checked and kept clear of debris.

I don't know what kind of leaves and detritus drift onto the boat while it's on it's mooring. This may not be a problem.

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These kids do their best work at night. After work, they painted the bottom, etc up until 11 PM, last night. 

I mentioned in the beginning of this thread that our Italian speaking son named the boat, 'NAMO. (informal of andiamo, maybe Roman slang). The name never stuck, at least to the boat. 

The ever-capable Edith to the rescue again: After her workday, she hand painted a new name on the $1 boat. Note the time on sons phone: Harry's nose says, 2 beers later. 

1776897826_NAMO_2020.thumb.png.7ceff24c65add497156c7059f781ad1f.png

 

Also, for all Harry's hard work, Tom made him half partner in the boat. I think he's showing promise in finance. 

 

 

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24' is big enough for a centre cockpit.

image.jpeg.560f0d926581ca406373544e7a123117.jpeg

 

Wouldn't a canvas cockpit cover help?

 

 

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I took a closer look at the Island Packet mysterious aft cabin. The boat hales from San Francisco. She's been in Maine at least 10 years. Strange areas on the topsides that someone started sanding a few years ago then seemed to drop the whole thing and walked away. 

 

She's a goner for sure. 

903713456_IPaftcabin._.thumb.jpg.c0f83bfcf6450f3d666c69f13fa7b840.jpg

 

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Great story, It looks to me that you need some weather striping on the lazorett hatches to seal

the channel from dripping into the inside

PL. 

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'NAMO floats. It was a great launch on a 'finest kind' spring day, with one mysterious leak. My son asked me to have a look. I guessed it to be one of the enclosed (and inaccessible) chambers that straddle the outboard well. With the bow up on the trailer, low water trapped inside found a crack in the above WL seam(?). We couldn't see it's origin. 

Ed the driver said, "You've got my number." and he let the boat slide free and headed off. You can see Ed had to wait for another hydraulic trailer launch.

Luckily the leak dried up (I'm told), so maybe I was right. 

1861370668_NAMOlaunchcrop.thumb.jpg.04dee6724bbde83be7b14c71cf7dbf4c.jpg

Two years in the 'back row', the old 2 stroke Yamaha (which has been sleeping in the boat), started on the second pull. 

 

(Today)I just ran down to fish through my boat for a clevis pin. The boys lucked out and friend Nate on a mobile crane was there finishing up two steps. He is just now stepping their mast (I hope). 

 

Thanks for following along. 

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That's quite the champagne glass turn to the bilges. I'll bet she sails well. 

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I love this thread. The guys rock, the ever-capable Edith is a wonder,  and dad's done good.

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We had a good rain last night. The boys brought 'NAMO into the dock this morning to bend on sails. 

 

I'm not bragging, but the boat didn't take on any water. The berths were dry and no water in the cockpit lockers. Last nights rain would have required 100 strokes with the bilge pump(I know). In fact we couldn't find any obvious deck leaks. Their new acrylic windows are tight as a drum. The only rainwater inside revealed that one of the main cockpit scuppers is leaking and needs embedding. Young Tom thinks it's probably been leaking but because the boat would be awash after a rain, it went unnoticed. 

 

They had the boat rigged in less than a half-hour and were off sailing, gone overnight. 

They still have a lot of stuff to reinstall in the boat so I'll wait for pics. Besides, Edith has one more surprise she's finishing up to install on the boat. 

Plenty of room on our public docks to get your boat ready (that's mine under the green tarp in the background). 

730556078_NAMOrigged2020.thumb.jpg.94bf9a0597e3082c70259cc2bdcb974d.jpg

 

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I like their dinghy. ....little glass peapod.

 

I hope the previous owner is seeing them having a blast with his old boat....

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I know that a $1 boat is not really a $1 boat. But you know, maybe they're into this...what? Fifteen hundred bucks and 240 hours, between the three of them.  Dad's hours don't count Kris...you work for free.  :lol:  It's the blessing of dadhood.

Contrast this to another post on this board where a perfectly nice guy is trying to spend $100,000 to get his kids and wife to go boating with him.

How much money you spend is NOT the point.  Even...the size and cushiness is not the point.

WANTING TO SAIL....is the point.

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3 hours ago, Alan H said:

I know that a $1 boat is not really a $1 boat. But you know, maybe they're into this...what? Fifteen hundred bucks and 240 hours, between the three of them.  Dad's hours don't count Kris...you work for free.  :lol:  It's the blessing of dadhood.

Contrast this to another post on this board where a perfectly nice guy is trying to spend $100,000 to get his kids and wife to go boating with him.

How much money you spend is NOT the point.  Even...the size and cushiness is not the point.

WANTING TO SAIL....is the point.

Right. Maybe people, especially new people, think sailing is too much about the boat. It's not. You have the passion or you don't. Once you have a passion for sailing, then of course, it's about the boat as well. 

 

Amazingly, these kids have a desire to sail, despite having to do it in a soggy, stinky boat. :)  They bring their sailing passion to the boat. 

 

After a shakedown sail, my son texted me to see if I had some thin weatherstripping. 'What for I texted back?' 'For the forward hatch. I noticed when we took water over the bow, it leaked.' 

 

I did have some thin closed-cell weatherstrip that he picked up later. Plus he borrowed a caulking gun as they plan to pull the old crazed plexi off and re'bed it. 

 

This is a new fantastic phase we're in after 5 years with this boat. They sailed the dickens out of it the last 5 seasons, but as I started this thread; this was a hard boat to love enough to put much work into. That, at least in the short term, has changed. 

 

My goal is still to keep the boat operable so that it may be passed on. If we go beyond that, all the better. It's a good boat. Maybe it needed a pandemic to save it? 

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I bet it's not THAT wet, nor is it THAT stinky.  Kris, I've owned a few boats in my lifetime: Cal 20, International H Boat, Santana 3030, Santa Cruz 27 and now the S2 7.9.  All of those are small...well the Santana 3030 wasn't "small" to my standards, but it's the only one in that list over 30 feet. The H Boat is a small 27 footer. The Santa Cruz 27 is small for a 27'er. The S2 7.9 is 26 feet, with a big ole daggerboard case breaking up the middle of the boat.

So an O-Day Outlaw is right in there with the size boat I've had all my life.  It was only 30-40  years ago that people sailed across oceans in boats not that terribly different from your $1 boat...think "Folkboat".  Your kids will have a blast in this, and if they decide they want something bigger in a few years, well...that's a GREAT daysailer!

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I'm sure it was covered earlier in the thread, but what type of boat is NAMO?

Thanks!

 

 

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1 hour ago, ds797 said:

I'm sure it was covered earlier in the thread, but what type of boat is NAMO?

Thanks!

 

 

The original post has it, as does the post right before yours. O'Day Outlaw.

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^^ Ish, WTF would we do with you. :P

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

^^ Ish, WTF would we do with you. :P

A good flogging?

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:
4 hours ago, Bull City said:

^^ Ish, WTF would we do with you. :P

A good flogging?

Oi!

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On 5/16/2020 at 5:00 PM, Kris Cringle said:

...

I'm not bragging, but the boat didn't take on any water....

 

Well you are...but rightly so.

You should be proud, and not just of the drains.

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16 hours ago, ds797 said:

I'm sure it was covered earlier in the thread, but what type of boat is NAMO?

Thanks!

 

 

A Philip Rhodes designed, O'Day Outlaw. 26' OA with an 8' cockpit, a nice feature in this size boat, especially for how these kids use it. 

 

Great boats but this one, like a growing field of old sailboats in my neck of the woods, had reached 0 value due to lack of the maintenance that all of us here perform or have performed. 

 

It was rejected by our Local YMCA Boat Auction, which is happening regularly to people that are trying to get rid of boats with no use to the owners. It's a pretty boat given some distance from the lens. And today, it's dry below. 

 

652712661_SKALbeam1(1of1).thumb.jpg.aded14a9c947f1024c1413015acc70a4.jpg

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For daysails and weekends, what the hell?  You could do an awful lot worse than that!

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A sow's ear into a silk purse.

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How_it_begins.thumb.jpg.aa25da04b528bc4d21a25a8e55a9dffa.jpg

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Don't let them succumb to two-foot-itis for at least another five years!

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This 're-fit' has gone on during the 2020 pandemic. 'NAMO is getting a lot of use, sailing.

Plus this use:My son's office in Boston has decided to continue to work remotely through September. Apparently, working remotely is working out for them. Our son says rumor is they are taking a look at their big showcase office space and wondering about a downsize of that $$$. 

I never would have thought working remotely was even close in reality. Yet something like 60% of this type of office centrist world is considering continuing working remotely. 

Our son is still at full compensation with his firm. He's decided to relocate back home in our area of the coast. He'll give up his apartment in Boston when the lease is up in August. 

I doubt he'll continue with his firm. He's been there long enough to establish a good work ethic and now, he's proven he can produce as a remote employee. To me, this looks like a cultural game-changer that's going on around the world. 

Every would be cruiser, for decades now, has asked the question, "How can I make money while living the dream sailing around the world?" Only a handful of people (we know them all!) has even come close. 

Yet this past week, here's my harbor. There's a Hinckley picnic boat, a gleaming woody mobo, a $100k daysailer, and sandwiched between is the $1 dollar boat. A solar panel stretched over the house forward of the mast is powering a laptop to receive 1 gig upload fiberoptic speed coming from the harbormaster's building. 

Our son sits under the black and white stripped awning(that came with the $1 boat), 'producing'. What's the (his) future? Beats me. 

 

1367068806_NAMOunderawning.thumb.jpg.1c5bd2828fbc6ec57a7134c924cdef57.jpg

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No question that office work is going to change dramatically, and that owners office space are in for an "interesting" ride.

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The pandemic has caused many businesses to reassess the wisdom of paying incredible sums to rent enormous office spaces. 

For years, managers absolutely refused to believe that employees could be productive and would work hard without someone breathing down their necks. Frankly, I was one of these doubters. The pandemic has proven that to be mostly wrong. My wife is working harder than she has before, in our sunroom every day. I practically have to beg her to sign off in the evenings.

The only way I'm ever going to be able to telework, is if I leave the defense contracting world, which is classified work that must be done on-site.

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The Outlaw is (as noted before/above) remarkably similar in design to the long-cockpit sisterships of my Ariel, the Pearson Commander. Might want to send the son over to pearsonariel.org for some reading - the Commander guys there are fairly prolific in their writings. Also, he can find tales of Commanders that have done impressive journeys - like Zoltan, who sailed one near RTW, or of the 2 brothers and a friend who early this century took one from Chicago down to the Gulf, further to the Canal, and then up the West Coast to N Cali. Using imagery from Sailboatdata.com, I made up an Outlaw/Commander comparison gif (below) - pretty darned similar! The Commander drawing is a lighter shade than the Outlaw.

Personally, tired of an always damp and dirty cockpit sole area in my stern-squatting but forward drained Ariel, I expanded the bridge deck aft 16" (thus decreasing footwell size) and built up the sole a bit over 2" on the front end, before putting a large drain right out the back into the outboard well aft. Water-keeping cockpit problem solved. :)

'Namo is a nice looking vessel, not hard to love at all if you have an eye for "classic" lines.

outlaw_commander.gif

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I think the nature of work is going to change again on the order of magnitude of electrification. Just as machines replaced muscle labor, so too will brain labor be replaced - same with the need to work in the same physical location. It seldom works in the favor of employees and often comes with upheaval, so I doworry about the youth.  COVID and other coming pandemics will just accelerate the process. 

In the meantime - go sailing. 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

I think the nature of work is going to change again on the order of magnitude of electrification. Just as machines replaced muscle labor, so too will brain labor be replaced - same with the need to work in the same physical location. It seldom works in the favor of employees and often comes with upheaval, so I doworry about the youth.  COVID and other coming pandemics will just accelerate the process. 

In contemporary capitalism, personal wealth is no longer generated by productive work of any form.  With very rare exceptions, that path leads to poverty, or to modest frugality.

Most of the money now goes to various forms of rent-seeking, rather than those who add value through work.   So if the youth want to avoid a life of struggle, their goal needs to be to at least evade the rent-seekers , and preferably become one.

Or, alternatively, organise some sort of revolution to overthrow the rent-seekers.

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

In contemporary capitalism, personal wealth is no longer generated by productive work of any form.  With very rare exceptions, that path leads to poverty, or to modest frugality.

Most of the money now goes to various forms of rent-seeking, rather than those who add value through work.   So if the youth want to avoid a life of struggle, their goal needs to be to at least evade the rent-seekers , and preferably become one.

Or, alternatively, organise some sort of revolution to overthrow the rent-seekers.

Yep. It's not just contemporary capitalism. It's a larger cycle that periodically re-sets after some traumatic event. You see the lovely Chateaus of France and think, "How did it take so long?" - I'm looking at you Palm Beach. 

In the mean time I'll enjoy my petite bourgeoisie 4ktshitbox attempt to accrete sufficient rent generating assets so that I can properly fuck off. 

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

In contemporary capitalism, personal wealth is no longer generated by productive work of any form.  With very rare exceptions, that path leads to poverty, or to modest frugality.

Most of the money now goes to various forms of rent-seeking, rather than those who add value through work.   So if the youth want to avoid a life of struggle, their goal needs to be to at least evade the rent-seekers , and preferably become one.

Or, alternatively, organise some sort of revolution to overthrow the rent-seekers.

Respectfully, the first paragraph is a wild over-generalization and ignores the millions of people who do well by good, old-fashioned hard work, by making stuff people want, by having an idea and the guts and talent to execute and bring their idea to fruition. Our society still rewards successful risk taking. 

The second is somewhat true, but it seems that, since politicians are overwhelmingly reelected, there is some part of the population that approves.  The problem isn't buying of influence, it's that the sale of it is so accepted these days. You can't buy something that isn't for sale. 

I approve of the third paragraph. 

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I labor by providing professional technology services.  I earn money,  I invest a portion of that money and I am definitely generating wealth. 

I'll never be as wealthy as @Cruisin Loserbut I will retire and be comfortable. 

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Just now, Ajax said:

I labor by providing professional technology services.  I earn money,  I invest a portion of that money and I am definitely generating wealth. 

I'll never be as wealthy as @Cruisin Loserbut I will retire and be comfortable. 

Baloney. If I had your money I'd burn mine. I've heard stories from the Chessie guys. 

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42 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Baloney. If I had your money I'd burn mine. I've heard stories from the Chessie guys. 

Lol,  you're confusing me with naval officers.  I was an enlisted man. 

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3 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

In contemporary capitalism, personal wealth is no longer generated by productive work of any form.  With very rare exceptions, that path leads to poverty, or to modest frugality.

Most of the money now goes to various forms of rent-seeking, rather than those who add value through work.   So if the youth want to avoid a life of struggle, their goal needs to be to at least evade the rent-seekers , and preferably become one.

Or, alternatively, organise some sort of revolution to overthrow the rent-seekers.

I don’t disagree, but would be more specific, the problem is that contemporary capitalism in many parts of the world has become contemporary socialism.

Here in Oz, the reason productive work does not lead to personal wealth is taxation, to pay the rent seekers.

Before I closed my medical practice, I calculated I had to work three hours as a doctor to pay a tradesman to work on my house for one hour. The tradesman still earnt an hourly rate less than I earnt, but the compounding effects of award rates, overheads, income and consumption taxes meant it made more sense for me to paint my house than to treat sick people.

And it’s getting too late to change it, down here in Tasmania, government provides the primary source of income in over 60% of households, that is government beneficiaries or state or federal employees, so that is over 60% of the votes in favour of increased rent seeking.

 

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