cbulger

Great 35-footers

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Thank Ed for the flashback at the Ericsson 35 - your right - great looking boat, maybe the best cockpit ever.

Our family had 3 of the best looking 35-footers ever - an Ericsson 35 in the 70’s, a Contessa 35 in the 80’s and a Holby built Tripp 37 (OK not a 35) in the 90’s.  All called Starlight, all raced and cruised in New England.  These are 3 of the best and most beautiful production 35’s ever built IMHO.

The boats got progressively faster, but my 94 year-old mom still reminisces about the Ericsson's cockpit.  She was a bit of a hobby-horse in east coast chop, and I remember 4 feet of the deck to hull seam coming apart in a particularly rough Vineyard Race - but we lovered that boat.

Will dig up picks.

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Hey thanks! I'm actually looking for one right now. I f anyone knows of a decent one, well, you know how to find me...

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Excellent report.  Imagine that, a boat on which people can actually be comfortable.  But where was the report on the important stuff, like the stereo?

Must be more old IOR warhorses around there, Choate 40's perhaps.  Islander 40 was also a great boat, and a Peterson design.

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Pssst... Ericson also made a 36 (Ron Holland design).

And a cruising version of the 39 - 39B.

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19 minutes ago, JoeO said:

Pssst... Ericson also made a 36 (Ron Holland design).

And a cruising version of the 39 - 39B.

listen, i rattled the various models off from my brain, of course i forgot a few, given the condition of my brain and all...

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25 minutes ago, PeterHuston said:

Excellent report.  Imagine that, a boat on which people can actually be comfortable.  But where was the report on the important stuff, like the stereo?

Must be more old IOR warhorses around there, Choate 40's perhaps.  Islander 40 was also a great boat, and a Peterson design.

thanks peter!

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I had a Santana 35 it was a great boat - of course I had to rebuild it.  its roomy has great PHRF rating, kids loved it,  and  not very complicated to sail.  Its still my families favorite boat.

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I'm a bit particular to our C&C 35 mk1. Only thing I don't love is the split cockpit.

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35 minutes ago, C. Spackler said:

This was not nearly the shit show I imagined. Great video, Ed. Do more. 

haha - right? i will for sure! 

also, i love all your suggestions people, but anything i get has to be 10' or narrower in order to fit in my killer slip!

 

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I love my '80s Ericson (32-III).  Well built, sails great, comfortable, and very much offshore-capable.

Highly recommend.... but the beam is over 10' (10'-10")

ObNote, I had been thinking of a same-vintage Ericson 34/35 before I found my 32, the 1980s 34-2 and 35-3 are basically the same hull but with differences in the interior layout, cockpit and transom profile.  But on digging in, I didn't like the fact that the 34/35 are more than 30% than my 32 (13,000 lbs vs 9700 lbs), and I wanted a boat that I could comfortably singlehand.  Plus, for that extra weight, basically what you get is the same interior with a slightly larger head compartment and a slightly larger hanging locker across from it.

 

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32's were never the racers that 35-2's were. still, i appreciate them.

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I had a great experience on an  Ericsson 35 around 1974. Delivery crew after a race on a dead run put up 2 spinnakers with 2 poles, port and starboard....every powerful and fast ~~~ 

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6 minutes ago, Editor said:

32's were never the racers that 35-2's were. still, i appreciate them.

Yeah, never really hit the racing scene in any depth (they didn't come out until mid-80s, long after the 35 and the original 34 had gotten their racing reputations).  The other 80s boats (34-2, 35-3, 38) never really did either.  The only 80s Ericsons with real racing chops were the Ron Holland 33 and 36.

But... this thing's a sleeper.  Base rating of 162, same rig as the original 3/4-tonner, if I felt like racing it I think it'd be a PHRF-killer.

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I can't look at the E35 without first hearing the whispers in the background of the name Dr. John Holiday.  Growing up in the Long Beach Yacht Club days, you would cringe if he was in your class in any distance race.  Didn't Mark Spitz have the Slow Erickson One Tonner?  BTW.  Scott & Justin.  This was extremely well done with perhaps the same expectations that Spackler had.  BTW2 - At that rating, I would still say the CF-27 was the boat to beat in PHRF; back in the day, and even now. Try to not get eaten by a Shark Sandwich

 

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J 36 if you can find one that doesn't have core with a thriving ecosystem inside. 

Sailed on a CT-38 for a while, gift o rama rating of 198 with the three bladed prop.  Easily sailed in the 160's once powered up.  Well built and generally a good value.  

Of course any boat from that era will likely need a bunch of love to make right. 

Good luck with the hunt. 

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Hmmm.

At least give Bruce King the credit he deserves!  He designed that entire line up.  BTW, the engine is not under/behind the stairs.  Rather, you were sitting on it while admiring Benny's collection of beer can trophies.

I just got off a 1978 MKII this morning that has some chronic wet core issues in the cabin trunk and side decks as well as some severely water damaged bulkheads at the main chainplates.  These are well built boats for the most part. But, given the age and the climate here in SoCal.........

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2 hours ago, DarkHorse said:

might be a bit pricey, but a great 35 footer!!!:

main-02-hero-Elliott-35-SuperSport-racing-yacht-high-res.jpg

Fucked off a fair  a few millionaires in it’s time 

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1 hour ago, Skirtchaser said:

Love the series Scot!  Keep 'er coming...

wow, thank you!

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1 hour ago, Hitchhiker said:

Hmmm.

At least give Bruce King the credit he deserves!  He designed that entire line up.  BTW, the engine is not under/behind the stairs.  Rather, you were sitting on it while admiring Benny's collection of beer can trophies.

I just got off a 1978 MKII this morning that has some chronic wet core issues in the cabin trunk and side decks as well as some severely water damaged bulkheads at the main chainplates.  These are well built boats for the most part. But, given the age and the climate here in SoCal.........

some of the 35's did indeed have the engine under the cockpit, but for sure the better boats had them forward. funny about me sitting around in benny's boat? have you been stalking me? haha!

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2 hours ago, Bulga Naba said:

I can't look at the E35 without first hearing the whispers in the background of the name Dr. John Holiday.  Growing up in the Long Beach Yacht Club days, you would cringe if he was in your class in any distance race.  Didn't Mark Spitz have the Slow Erickson One Tonner?  BTW.  Scott & Justin.  This was extremely well done with perhaps the same expectations that Spackler had.  BTW2 - At that rating, I would still say the CF-27 was the boat to beat in PHRF; back in the day, and even now. Try to not get eaten by a Shark Sandwich

 

doc holiday and Aquarius! i remember reading sea and yachting magazine and drooling over that boat and her mighty double head rig. stay tuned for more of that....

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3 minutes ago, Editor said:

doc holiday and Aquarius! i remember reading sea and yachting magazine and drooling over that boat and her mighty double head rig. stay tuned for more of that....

Yup, and from my mis-spent youth, Doc Sodaro (Robin Sodaro's dad) and "Andiamo" out of Balboa YC.  Their E35-2 was the first "big boat" I ever raced on, and we had some epic midwinter battles against Aquarius....

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that is so cool. i think it is going to be a total blast. lotta work to get one good, but i love thios kind of shit.

btw, i hear someone in so cal builds replacement rudders. anybody know about them?

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2 hours ago, ROADKILL666 said:

No one said j35

Ya that was a real breakthru boat.  It would beat up on IOR turds of the day that were 10 feet longer, boat for boat.  Not particularly comfortable though, especially the cockpit.

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1 hour ago, Editor said:

funny about me sitting around in benny's boat? have you been stalking me? haha!.

Umm. No. You say sailed by Benny and family 33 secs in!!

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Just now, Hitchhiker said:

Umm. No. You say sailed by Benny and family 33 secs in!!

no, but i actually have sat below benny's boat, staring at his trophy selection!

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have you looked at a hobie 33? mumm 36 isn't a bad boat either as long as you can find one that wasn't built by carroll

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3 hours ago, ROADKILL666 said:

No one said j35

Because the Ed has a 10' beam limit.

There are uncounted great 35' boats out there but that 10' BMAX really cuts the field down.

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32 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Because the Ed has a 10' beam limit.

There are uncounted great 35' boats out there but that 10' BMAX really cuts the field down.

it sure do! seriously, it is going to be an e-35-2. just as soon as the check clears on a4

if i wanted a hobie 33, i woulda bought one years ago - and they ain't much for hanging out on. the ft is as good as they are for that, but way faster and way more fun.

33's are great phrf cheater boats, though...

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In '77 I chartered an Ericson 35 out of New Haven, Conn. and sailed it up to Newport with a couple of friends to spectate Turner win America's Cup with Courageous. Such a classic stoner adventure!

Late in the afternoon before the first race for the Cup, we're pulling into Newport. No slip or mooring reservation. No plans. Just, Here we are! Go to start the engine: no go. Could not get the engine to light. Checked the filter and a few other things but we were running out of sea-room and daylight. So we're bopping along with just the main up, not quite bouncing from dock to dock, and everyone's saying, "Hey! You can't stay here! Fuck off!" and off we go a little further to leeward...

We finally end up side tied to a kind of high wharf and a minute goes by with no one yelling at us. So far, so good. Then some shaggy-haired dude leans over the rail and says, "Y' can't stay here, mate." We'd landed on the Aussie compound. I explained our trouble and a couple more heads came over and agreed to let us spend the night but we had to get it together by tomorrow night. We got drunk, fired off a few pocket safety flares, then stumbled on out to dinner. Again, no reservations, just, Hey... this place looks good...

Of course we end up seated next to Team Courageous. We're talking a bit with some of them and mentioned the engine trouble. Some guy said, "You gotta call [I forget] in the morning. He knows those engines inside and out!" By 8 am, the engine guy is there and he's kind of staring at us and asks, "How'd you get to dock at the Aussie compound?" Anyway, he makes short work of the problem (it was the fuel filter after-all... the OTHER fuel filter!) and charged us some ridiculously low fee. We asked him if he knew of any places we could tie up for the week. He said, "This week? Are you nuts...... wait..."  He remembered that one of the Marine Services [or wherever it was he worked] boats was in dry dock so we could use that slip. He'd have to charge us though. $10/night seem fair?

By 10:00 or so we joined the armada headed out to watch match #1. The rest of the week was lost to memory except that we did have tons of fun.

And a great sail back to Connecticut after it was over. We had a pleasant run until sunset to maybe Old Saybrook (I can't really remember) where I found a rickety little floating dock to side tie. But as the night wore on, the wind was building again and this little dock was becoming highly stressed by having us tied to it. At about 5:00 am I made the call. We had to bail outta there and at sea was safer than trying to bumble around in that wind, in the dark, in an unfamiliar area. At dawn I unfurled the 150% and started surfing with full main and 150, taking a knock-down or 3, until just outside of New Haven. Buttoned her up, collected our gear, turned in the keys to the charter broker, and hit the comparative calm of NYC.

A good week on a great boat.

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3 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

In '77 I chartered an Ericson 35 out of New Haven, Conn. and sailed it up to Newport with a couple of friends to spectate Turner win America's Cup with Courageous. Such a classic stoner adventure!

Late in the afternoon before the first race for the Cup, we're pulling into Newport. No slip or mooring reservation. No plans. Just, Here we are! Go to start the engine: no go. Could not get the engine to light. Checked the filter and a few other things but we were running out of sea-room and daylight. So we're bopping along with just the main up, not quite bouncing from dock to dock, and everyone's saying, "Hey! You can't stay here! Fuck off!" and off we go a little further to leeward...

We finally end up side tied to a kind of high wharf and a minute goes by with no one yelling at us. So far, so good. Then some shaggy-haired dude leans over the rail and says, "Y' can't stay here, mate." We'd landed on the Aussie compound. I explained our trouble and a couple more heads came over and agreed to let us spend the night but we had to get it together by tomorrow night. We got drunk, fired off a few pocket safety flares, then stumbled on out to dinner. Again, no reservations, just, Hey... this place looks good...

Of course we end up seated next to Team Courageous. We're talking a bit with some of them and mentioned the engine trouble. Some guy said, "You gotta call [I forget] in the morning. He knows those engines inside and out!" By 8 am, the engine guy is there and he's kind of staring at us and asks, "How'd you get to dock at the Aussie compound?" Anyway, he makes short work of the problem (it was the fuel filter after-all... the OTHER fuel filter!) and charged us some ridiculously low fee. We asked him if he knew of any places we could tie up for the week. He said, "This week? Are you nuts...... wait..."  He remembered that one of the Marine Services [or wherever it was he worked] boats was in dry dock so we could use that slip. He'd have to charge us though. $10/night seem fair?

By 10:00 or so we joined the armada headed out to watch match #1. The rest of the week was lost to memory except that we did have tons of fun.

And a great sail back to Connecticut after it was over. We had a pleasant run until sunset to maybe Old Saybrook (I can't really remember) where I found a rickety little floating dock to side tie. But as the night wore on, the wind was building again and this little dock was becoming highly stressed by having us tied to it. At about 5:00 am I made the call. We had to bail outta there and at sea was safer than trying to bumble around in that wind and no light in an unfamiliar area. At dawn I unfurled the 150% and started surfing with full main and 150, taking a knock-down or 3, until just outside of New Haven. Buttoned her up, collected our gear, turned in the keys to the charter broker, and hit the comparative calm of NYC.

A good week on a great boat.

god damn, stories like that are just the best!

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8 hours ago, hard aground said:

I'm a bit particular to our C&C 35 mk1. Only thing I don't love is the split cockpit.

the MKIII is pretty sweet too

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33 minutes ago, justanothersailor said:

The first series of 36' by Sydney Yacht IMS design

10' max beam!

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Do you foresee becoming the crazy old guy that lives on his boat down the dock?

If so the E-35 is a great boat:D

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3 hours ago, sledracr said:

We have a E35 Mkii, one guy told me the same rudder for the E32 was used on the E35 Mkii.  The original rudder didn't steer the boat at all. We ordered a Foss rudder that many E35 Mkii have and it was exactly what the boat needed.

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9 minutes ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

We have a E35 Mkii, one guy told me the same rudder for the E32 was used on the E35 Mkii.  The original rudder didn't steer the boat at all. We ordered a Foss rudder that many E35 Mkii have and it was exactly what the boat needed.

It's a modified "Schumacher rudder" which was designed to tame the Cal40.

This scan should show you what yer getting.

Ericson-35-004_638px.thumb.jpg.b46377def1fd34de582b83878e0f92c9.jpg

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Having been addicted to sailing porn since before any other kind I have seen more "boat reviews" than I care to admit.  FINALLY a review by someone who not only knows boats, knows how to sail them, knows whats important and  can speak intelligently about whats there and what is not...  #1 issue with boats and the most important part is the cockpit, #2 is the sidedeck.  You lead us through these with explanations, examples, time and consideration of these two most important facets of any boat.  Imagine effin that... a guy who knows about boats doing a review...  Oh and BTW you have never seen a vertical companionway until you climb the fire escape of a Swan 38 or Gecco 39..  Keep going, cant wait to see whats next!!!

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You young fucks need to learn how to drive the old boats and come to our same conclusion,,,

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14 hours ago, cbulger said:

Thank Ed for the flashback at the Ericsson 35 - your right - great looking boat, maybe the best cockpit ever.

Our family had 3 of the best looking 35-footers ever - an Ericsson 35 in the 70’s, a Contessa 35 in the 80’s and a Holby built Tripp 37 (OK not a 35) in the 90’s.  All called Starlight, all raced and cruised in New England.  These are 3 of the best and most beautiful production 35’s ever built IMHO.

The boats got progressively faster, but my 94 year-old mom still reminisces about the Ericsson's cockpit.  She was a bit of a hobby-horse in east coast chop, and I remember 4 feet of the deck to hull seam coming apart in a particularly rough Vineyard Race - but we lovered that boat.

Will dig up picks.

I had a lot of fun on an Erickson 35 last year The Commodore at our club asked me to take his twin redhead granddaughters out for a sail. They were on spring break from the all girl college they attend. It was a super hot day and and they showed up with another set of  twins,  blond from the all girl soccer team at their college . The breeze was light that day so it took a while to get out to the middle of the bay and two of them were up on the foredeck getting busy. I don't know what happened to their skimpy bikinis. Anyway the other two were lounging in the cockpit when all of a sudden the other blond got up and grabbed my tiller while the othe  redhea....... on wait it was an Erickson 36.  never mind. 

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Great video and discussion.  Keep them coming.  Several years ago I was looking at Erickson's for family cruising and beer can/semi serious weekend racing.  I ended up with another great 1980s boat;  a Canadian Sailcraft (CS) 36 traditional.  Have fallen in love with the CS,  particularly since I sail in San Francisco where I can really use its 15,500 lb  displacement.  Not many of these boats on the west coast, as they were built and sold mostly on the east coast and great lakes.  Big bow overhang like the Erickson, and yes a great cockpit (I am 6'2" and I can lay down) even with the mainsheet and traveler in the cockpit as my version had.

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We had one of the last of the 35-2s.  Diesel engine under the cockpit, not under the seat.  Great boat we had a lot of fun with racing on Puget Sound.

JM

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Get one of these mother fathers to go with your retro Erickson ride 

87935359-4F19-4B1B-B619-DD59723EFF19.png

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Given the 10' beam limit, a couple of boats come to mind

Abbott 36 and Dash 34.

Abbott is the cruisier of the two.  Dash can be turboed down to a PHRF 66 Like AK below with a Farr 30 rig, but base is 113 with inboard.

post-5483-1190163888.jpg

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I was thinking about an A35, but after looking up the data, your slip is 1ft too small

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9 hours ago, See Level said:

Do you foresee becoming the crazy old guy that lives on his boat down the dock?

If so the E-35 is a great boat:D

Complete with 'Pot" plants on the deck...

 

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Adams10(32) +sprit=35

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18 hours ago, hard aground said:

I'm a bit particular to our C&C 35 mk1. Only thing I don't love is the split cockpit.

I do like it. For one thing the rudder stock sits where you can actually sail around with the tiller like a normal boat instead of it being a weird kluge that needs a pipe wrenches and 4-part tackle to steer. It is annoying for cooking on the grill though.

IMHO one of the best features is the "pre IOR" hull shape. I have done enough heavy air downwind in 35s and the successor IOR-fied 34 to know the difference :)

 

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5 hours ago, Zeusproject said:

34 weapon 

A3BF6FB0-F619-4143-BC3B-F618889D52B8.jpeg

Nice boat, but I doubt it meets the Ed's 10 ft beam limit - or his comment about super low budget below.  A decent Dash 34 could be had for around $10-15K.  Close to 6 ft headroom and decent, but somewhat Spartan interior. Ericson 35 is probably his best choice.

On 5/7/2020 at 8:40 AM, Editor said:

i love those boats! there is one in oceanside that is/was for sale. i am going super low budget so they are not in my range, but yes fast, i dig em.

 

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15 hours ago, See Level said:

Do you foresee becoming the crazy old guy that lives on his boat down the dock?

If so the E-35 is a great boat:D

if trump continues to gut america, i just might be.

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15 hours ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

We have a E35 Mkii, one guy told me the same rudder for the E32 was used on the E35 Mkii.  The original rudder didn't steer the boat at all. We ordered a Foss rudder that many E35 Mkii have and it was exactly what the boat needed.

that is one of the first things i am going to do when i find the 35 for me! the real fun will come when phrf sd decides how badly to sodomize me for it. they've already hammered the 35 so badly here (thanks benny) mine will prolly end up rating the same as a4 when they are done with me...

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Are there ANY 35 foot boats with 10 foot beams besides something like a meter boat? My beam on my C&C 35 is about 10.5 feet and I am narrower than any modern era 35 I have ever seen.

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14 minutes ago, Editor said:

if trump continues to gut america, i just might be.

Can you just shut the F up...stick to boats.   

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2 minutes ago, sail69 said:

Can you just shut the F up...stick to boats.   

oh no - a butthurt snowflake! so sensitive, mr.69. but to answer your question, no i can't. 

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9 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Are there ANY 35 foot boats with 10 foot beams besides something like a meter boat? My beam on my C&C 35 is about 10.5 feet and I am narrower than any modern era 35 I have ever seen.

the only other boat i considered was a ranger 33, which is probably a better boat, with a 9.8 beam. but man, if you compare the actual sizes in person, the 33 cockpit is much smaller and narrower, below is much smaller and dark. no,the 35 is the right one for me!

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23 hours ago, sledracr said:

Yeah, never really hit the racing scene in any depth (they didn't come out until mid-80s, long after the 35 and the original 34 had gotten their racing reputations).  The other 80s boats (34-2, 35-3, 38) never really did either.  The only 80s Ericsons with real racing chops were the Ron Holland 33 and 36.

But... this thing's a sleeper.  Base rating of 162, same rig as the original 3/4-tonner, if I felt like racing it I think it'd be a PHRF-killer.

The 39 was not so bad in the day..  

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Are there ANY 35 foot boats with 10 foot beams besides something like a meter boat? My beam on my C&C 35 is about 10.5 feet and I am narrower than any modern era 35 I have ever seen.

I listed two: Abbott 36 and Dash 34.  Okay, not 35 ft exactly, but a foot on either side.

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16 hours ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

We have a E35 Mkii, one guy told me the same rudder for the E32 was used on the E35 Mkii.  The original rudder didn't steer the boat at all. We ordered a Foss rudder that many E35 Mkii have and it was exactly what the boat needed.

Do you know if the E35 Mk3 had the same issues with the rudder? I'm going to look at one this weekend.

 

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2 minutes ago, Roam said:

Do you know if the E35 Mk3 had the same issues with the rudder? I'm going to look at one this weekend.

 

No idear.

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28 minutes ago, shaggy said:

The 39 was not so bad in the day..  

True.  And the 46 was practically the very definition of a battlewagon.

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A little older but Pearson 35 claims a 10ft beam.

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1 minute ago, sledracr said:

True.  And the 46 was practically the very definition of a battlewagon.

totally! i remember when they came out - fucking amazing things.

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1 minute ago, Essex said:

A little older but Pearson 35 claims a 10ft beam.

too old, too slow, but thanks!

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6 minutes ago, Editor said:

totally! i remember when they came out - fucking amazing things.

Truer words were never spoken. A throwback to the day when, if you wanted to go faster, you put some more winches on the deck. :P 35,500# displacement and a huge sail inventory to power it. Funny thing tho, ours had the aft companionway rather than a wheel on the back of the cabin house, with a pedestal a couple feet aft of that and big Lewmar 65s on the doghouse forward of the helm. It was easier to single hand than our current 40er with the wheel in the stern aft of the traveler. And what a cockpit! eight people sitting comfortably aft of the helmsman, get a gust going upwind and she just put her shoulder into it, everyone dry and safe below those huge seatbacks and you could handle everything from the helm. Some of my fondest memories is of my 8 year old daughter in her pink Little Mermaid sweatshirt steering as I trimmed sails, going right over the top of smaller boats and me pretending not to notice the double takes. We never raced her though. That would have been a major exercise in crew recruitment, logistics and sail handling.

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2 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Are there ANY 35 foot boats with 10 foot beams besides something like a meter boat? My beam on my C&C 35 is about 10.5 feet and I am narrower than any modern era 35 I have ever seen.

x-35, fits.

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1 hour ago, kinardly said:

Truer words were never spoken. A throwback to the day when, if you wanted to go faster, you put some more winches on the deck. :P 35,500# displacement and a huge sail inventory to power it. Funny thing tho, ours had the aft companionway rather than a wheel on the back of the cabin house, with a pedestal a couple feet aft of that and big Lewmar 65s on the doghouse forward of the helm. It was easier to single hand than our current 40er with the wheel in the stern aft of the traveler. And what a cockpit! eight people sitting comfortably aft of the helmsman, get a gust going upwind and she just put her shoulder into it, everyone dry and safe below those huge seatbacks and you could handle everything from the helm. Some of my fondest memories is of my 8 year old daughter in her pink Little Mermaid sweatshirt steering as I trimmed sails, going right over the top of smaller boats and me pretending not to notice the double takes. We never raced her though. That would have been a major exercise in crew recruitment, logistics and sail handling.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1973/ericson-46-sloop-3667108/

Same helm layout, but old Barients rather than Lewmars

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22 minutes ago, Pehrst said:

x-35, fits.

sadly, the club won't allow anything over exactly 10.0

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1 hour ago, kinardly said:

Truer words were never spoken. A throwback to the day when, if you wanted to go faster, you put some more winches on the deck. :P 35,500# displacement and a huge sail inventory to power it. Funny thing tho, ours had the aft companionway rather than a wheel on the back of the cabin house, with a pedestal a couple feet aft of that and big Lewmar 65s on the doghouse forward of the helm. It was easier to single hand than our current 40er with the wheel in the stern aft of the traveler. And what a cockpit! eight people sitting comfortably aft of the helmsman, get a gust going upwind and she just put her shoulder into it, everyone dry and safe below those huge seatbacks and you could handle everything from the helm. Some of my fondest memories is of my 8 year old daughter in her pink Little Mermaid sweatshirt steering as I trimmed sails, going right over the top of smaller boats and me pretending not to notice the double takes. We never raced her though. That would have been a major exercise in crew recruitment, logistics and sail handling.

what cabin house? ;)

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

True.  And the 46 was practically the very definition of a battlewagon.

Got a good Ericson 46 story... when I was a kid in the 70s, wed night race in Annapolis.  A local sailing legend got an Ericson 46 for a season or 2.  It was later in the season with a NE-er blowing 15 to 20, rainy, puffs to 25. For those who don't know Annapolis Wed night racing finishes right at the clubhouse, about 30 yards or so from the Eastport drawbridge.  It's a broad reach coming into the finish, IORish boats rocking and rolling into the finish with kites up.  In comes the Ericson 46 drawing about a 4 foot quarter wave, 9 knots or so, oscillating, and they can't get the kite down, barreling right at the drawbridge!  Skipper throws the helm over and rides her up on the pier at the marina across the creek from Annapolis YC.  Damn I wish there had been video back in those days....

Hefty damage to the pier, the boat was pretty much fine except for some scratches and minor gouges.

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The 46 was in its prime when I got interested in sailing. I used to drool over this pic in their ads of the time.

Unfortunately my soul didn't have enough value at the time to pay for one.

image.png.6acb742c80b02ea88331556497352755.png

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10 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

The 46 was in its prime when I got interested in sailing. I used to drool over this pic in their ads of the time.

Unfortunately my soul didn't have enough value at the time to pay for one.

image.png.6acb742c80b02ea88331556497352755.png

Dude on the foredeck wearing bell bottoms. Classic.

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Obviously a real sailor. ;)

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On 5/7/2020 at 9:12 AM, cbulger said:

Thank Ed for the flashback at the Ericsson 35 - your right - great looking boat, maybe the best cockpit ever.

Our family had 3 of the best looking 35-footers ever - an Ericsson 35 in the 70’s, a Contessa 35 in the 80’s and a Holby built Tripp 37 (OK not a 35) in the 90’s.  All called Starlight, all raced and cruised in New England.  These are 3 of the best and most beautiful production 35’s ever built IMHO.

The boats got progressively faster, but my 94 year-old mom still reminisces about the Ericsson's cockpit.  She was a bit of a hobby-horse in east coast chop, and I remember 4 feet of the deck to hull seam coming apart in a particularly rough Vineyard Race - but we lovered that boat.

Will dig up picks.

If were slipping in two ft. bigger, Im going 2 under....Ranger 33

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21 hours ago, 12 metre said:

I listed two: Abbott 36 and Dash 34.  Okay, not 35 ft exactly, but a foot on either side.

Shag

Next time I see you down at the Marina ask me about how we took off the stern of Dick Pennington's E-39 Cheetah (before he got a Sled) with Ted Turners Aluminum One Tonner Lightnin.'  I was driving and my bow guy said we were clear.  Ah, not quite John.  (we remind him to this day) The look on Dick's face as we rolled into his cockpit was priceless!

Bad Altitude

 

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Here's a little treat for SA forum readers- likely something you've never seen before.
 
Around 2004, when I wanted to sell my family's 1978 Islander 36 and look for a more modern design, and before I discovered the A35, there was no other boat I really liked, so on a lark, I contacted my childhood friend and accomplished naval architect, Jim Donovan, and asked him to design me my fantasy 37 foot sailboat. I never did build it- a divorce sort of got me sidetracked- but I can now reveal Jim's custom design, and even though it's now more than 15 years later, it's still a fresh and beautiful design- a testimony to how forward-thinking Jim's mind is. Enjoy!

D 37 Deck Layout[1]..jpg

D 37 Sailplan.jpg

D 37 Interior.jpg

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Kirby 30 would be a great boat for SD. Roomy, fast and a great rating.

 

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11 minutes ago, Meat Wad said:

Kirby 30 would be a great boat for SD. Roomy, fast and a great rating.

 

Okay boat, but only if it is the tall rig version.  Regular version sticky in the light stuff.  

Over 10 ft beam anyway.

Interior wise, the Kirby makes the Dash seem like a Swan in comparison.

Performance wise, a base Dash is a bit sticky downwind in the light stuff (which is pretty common of most NZ designs of that era), but the results speak for themselves.

At the last two iterations of WIRW, Mad Dash (hull No. 1) with a 105 rating (so mildly turboed ) has scored 13 consecutive bullets against the likes of Melges 24s and J/29s, which is possibly a record for such a PHRF event.

WIRW 2018 results: https://yachtscoring.com/event_results_cumulative.cfm?eID=4546

WIRW 2019 results: https://yachtscoring.com/event_results_cumulative.cfm?eID=6142

So yeah, I would go for a Dash 34 over a Kirby 30 any day.

I just realized I forgot about the Ross 930 which has only 9.25 ft beam and a very decent interior especially the aft head version IMO.  Better choice than the Dash actually, but needs some turboing as well, although most of them come with genoas now and oversized kites.

 

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One of my all time favourite 35 ftrs.  Won't fit in the ed's slip, but it will do some damage in 'dago! Looks much sharper now too.

IMG_1587(1).JPG

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20 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

One of my all time favourite 35 ftrs.  Won't fit in the ed's slip, but it will do some damage in 'dago! Looks much sharper now too.

IMG_1587(1).JPG

What is it?

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