FishFood

Tips For Being Rescued

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Hey guys, 

I just wanted to spread some tips on how to make your medevac ride just a little bit smoother.

First things first, make sure you your essentials. This could include cell phones (for flicking it up on the heli), wallets (for post rescue Big Macs), and any medicines that may be needed.

Secondly, you’ll need to be ready to jump (and your crew members too). Apparently some people get a little hesitant jumping into 500ft of depth in the middle of 15ft seas. You may have to push certain individuals toward the rescue swimmer.

Lastly, make sure you shoot enough flares to make it all worth it. It’s pretty fun.

https://coastguardnews.com/coast-guard-aircrew-rescues-3-from-disabled-sailboat-in-pillar-point/2020/05/20/

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Hate to be that guy, but Wx looks fairly calm...  no white caps, and the (not tied down) mainsail isn’t even flapping around.   Even abeam of the swells, boat is only rocking <20deg. 

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"Loss of steering and engine failure"

What happened out there, @FishFood? I'm assuming the engine failure was lack of electrical but did something happen to the rudder or tiller?

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Starboard!! said:

Hate to be that guy, but Wx looks fairly calm...  no white caps, and the (not tied down) mainsail isn’t even flapping around.   Even abeam of the swells, boat is only rocking <20deg. 

At least it was rough enough that harbor patrol stood down. Maybe their boat isn't seaworthy enough to deal with those conditions.

Is this the boat? https://www.hmbreview.com/news/rescue-boat-returns-to-pillar-point-harbor/article_87c1b45e-4e2a-11e8-8342-3b7b2e06ce9a.html

Edited by Upp3
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some people just shouldn't leave land .

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3 minutes ago, Mid said:

some people just shouldn't leave land .

I agree.

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6 hours ago, zenmasterfred said:

Was that you F'ing Fish Food in the sling w/ the rescue swimmer?????

Wrong coast for gomer and squeaky......

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Yeah the weather actually wasn't the main issue and was super variable, you also are seeing the conditions underneath a chopper hovering just 40ft which is disturbing the water below. Our boat was literally fully engulfed in white water at times with mountains disappearing on the horizon. I was fine with this and even giddy at the conditions.

Things went south when a crew member on board had a severe panic attack (coast guard didn't release video of this individual). I was the only person capable of navigating the boat (tons of weather helm and the angle of the wind on the waves made us prone to an accidental gybe while navigating the waves) and the only crew member who could help with anything was dealing with the person down below. After about three hours of this person being in duress and puking all over the boat, we called to have her medevaced. We were planning on staying with the boat until the medevac got there and we had to depower. After we had taken down the main, the chopper blew it into a mess and we were being tossed around uncontrollably. The loss of steeage noted was just toward the end and was due to improper trim which couldn't be fixed while dealing with this person and the rescue swimmer, the individual wouldn't jump. I decided to pull the main down and just come to a halt.

By the time this was happening we were in a very bad position to get moving again and decided to leave the boat after the coast guard asked. Had we never had to adjust course and deal with this, we likely would have been fine. The biggest failure on my part is taking someone out in that who had no business being out there under any captain's watch.

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1 hour ago, FishFood said:

The biggest failure on my part is taking someone out in that who had no business being out there under any captain's watch.

It would be very interesting, and probably a learning experience for us all, if you could describe his condition/behavior/actions in more detail.  How he behaved before, during and after the trip.  What warnings you had.  What you did right or wrong in dealing with him. 

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5 hours ago, FishFood said:

The biggest failure on my part is taking someone out in that who had no business being out there under any captain's watch.

You don't have the experience to be out there as person-in-command. The dumb-luck experience you have written about here is not qualifying for anything.

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15 hours ago, FishFood said:

Hey guys, 

I just wanted to spread some tips on how to make your medevac ride just a little bit smoother.

First things first, make sure you your essentials. This could include cell phones (for flicking it up on the heli), wallets (for post rescue Big Macs), and any medicines that may be needed.

Secondly, you’ll need to be ready to jump (and your crew members too). Apparently some people get a little hesitant jumping into 500ft of depth in the middle of 15ft seas. You may have to push certain individuals toward the rescue swimmer.

Lastly, make sure you shoot enough flares to make it all worth it. It’s pretty fun.

https://coastguardnews.com/coast-guard-aircrew-rescues-3-from-disabled-sailboat-in-pillar-point/2020/05/20/

Follow instructions...that is all

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7 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

Follow instructions...that is all

I have the feeling that failure to follow instructions might be a theme...

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So, what happened to "Freedom"? Was she ever rescued or did you pull out a plug as you left or is she still floating around out there, just waiting to either get rescued or get crushed by a passing tanker? 

She honestly was a pretty decent boat, hate to see that end up a pile of kindling or a reef.

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12 minutes ago, Vaeredil said:

So, what happened to "Freedom"? Was she ever rescued or did you pull out a plug as you left or is she still floating around out there, just waiting to either get rescued or get crushed by a passing tanker? 

She honestly was a pretty decent boat, hate to see that end up a pile of kindling or a reef.

I always thought the Coast Guard will not let a boat float but that is apparently not true any longer. It will probably be found in as few weeks, floating around.

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19 hours ago, FishFood said:

Hey guys, 

I just wanted to spread some tips on how to make your medevac ride just a little bit smoother.

First things first, make sure you your essentials. This could include cell phones (for flicking it up on the heli), wallets (for post rescue Big Macs), and any medicines that may be needed.

Secondly, you’ll need to be ready to jump (and your crew members too). Apparently some people get a little hesitant jumping into 500ft of depth in the middle of 15ft seas. You may have to push certain individuals toward the rescue swimmer.

Lastly, make sure you shoot enough flares to make it all worth it. It’s pretty fun.

https://coastguardnews.com/coast-guard-aircrew-rescues-3-from-disabled-sailboat-in-pillar-point/2020/05/20/

Was that your home?

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The news report implies the boat was in the Pillar Pt. Harbor. That would be a good story ...

The wind was onshore. Boat should have washed up a few miles south by dawn.

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1 hour ago, El Boracho said:

The news report implies the boat was in the Pillar Pt. Harbor. That would be a good story ...

The wind was onshore. Boat should have washed up a few miles south by dawn.

Yeah, the writer didn’t get it quite right, they couldn’t have been inside the harbor and the harbor boat not able to get to them...

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WTF?  I say again WTF?  

TIP #1:  Don't put yourself in a position to require rescuing!  The CG isn't there a lot of times in the big scary open water.

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5 minutes ago, zenmasterfred said:

WTF?  I say again WTF?  

X1000

This is not "a good story" or something to joke about. You got rescued from your boat because someone was seasick? I honestly don't give a shit about those tax dollars, but those CG people put their lives at risk. No YOU put their lives at risk! 

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Roger That, Another Sailor, couldn't agree more.  Most of us have been "seasick" at one tome or another, in the big water you HTFU and stand your watch.  Lucky that it's been a long time (50+ years or more) since I have suffered mal de mer and a lot of miles under the keel but calling the CG off Pillar Point?  Again, WTF?

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Hopefully the same bunch doesn't turn up in this thread and tell him he's doing great things and going to be a star.

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21 hours ago, FishFood said:

We were planning on staying with the boat until the medevac got there and we had to depower. After we had taken down the main, the chopper blew it into a mess and we were being tossed around uncontrollably. The loss of steeage noted was just toward the end and was due to improper trim which couldn't be fixed while dealing with this person and the rescue swimmer, the individual wouldn't jump. I decided to pull the main down and just come to a halt.

By the time this was happening we were in a very bad position to get moving again and decided to leave the boat after the coast guard asked. 

You took the main down then the helo messed it up, THEN you took it down (somehow, again?) And were gonna sail with it though it was messed up? Something about this sequence doesn't add up. 

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Stress scrambles planning, responses, and memory.

that is why eye witnesses to crimes are generally useless

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Should not have put CG people into the position of risking their lives to rescue your panic woman et al. Hope you did not give them COVID19 while you were at it. 

People who panic and tie up all attention are not "crew" btw they are "passengers."

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Clearly a lack of judgement in taking inexperienced crew out into inappropriate conditions. 

But, it does happen. He's not the first, won't be the last. 

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you guys are way to nice...... op is a fuckwit. full stop.

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Kid, you need to step your game up, big time. And when you do look me up. But I’m dropping you as a client.  Maybe my good buddy Eddie could help you out. I hear he’s a big wheel in Poland. 

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14 hours ago, BlondeWithFreeBoat said:

You took the main down then the helo messed it up, THEN you took it down (somehow, again?) And were gonna sail with it though it was messed up? Something about this sequence doesn't add up. 

No, I explained why I took the main down. My post was a bit confusing as I've had hardly any sleep since dealing with this. We had no steerage while dealing with this individual and the CG over radio. I had to man the tiller and navigate the conditions and the only person capable of helping with anything on deck was dealing with the individual below. When the bird was in our vicinity, the main was dropped and the rescue swimmer was dropped from the bird. At this time we were dealing with the individual who wouldn't jump and the lowered main was blown into a mess. This made it nearly impossible for us to attempt continuing on safely as depowering resulted in the boat being tossed about heavily. It really only made sense for both me and the other individual to jump ship and the CG asked.

For those who say it was "seasickness" please shut up. I was seasick while dealing with this and many other times and never acted in this manner. This was an extreme anxiety/panic attack. It's 100% my fault that happened but to call it seasickness is a bit obtuse. This person is diagnosed with anxiety disorder.

Again, go ahead and have your opinions about whether I'm ok sailing in that (no way in hell I would have called the CG in that alone) but a fact of the matter is that that "passenger" shouldn't have been on board in those conditions.

For those that whine about risking CG lives, feel free to take a look at the picture they posted in the press release. They were about as happy as could be to actually be able to do their job and help out. Talk to some coasties sometime and I'm sure you'll find the "never take risks and never call the CG" crowd is almost nonexistent. If the likely outcome is going to require assistance then of course avoid the situation. However, I did not believe that to be the case and I don't think it would be the case with the vast majority of passengers. 

In terms of legitimate advice, take into account the mental and physical health of everyone on board and make sure the conditions fall within appropriate bounds. Sounds like common sense but we all know that isn't common.

Lol at those who say somethings fishy. Do you think I wanted a floating wrecking ball making its way down the coast and to deal with numerous federal and state agencies? For what? To claim my liability insurance? lol. Some of you are funny. 

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2 minutes ago, FishFood said:

Again, go ahead and have your opinions about whether I'm ok sailing in that (no way in hell I would have called the CG in that alone) but a fact of the matter is that that "passenger" shouldn't have been on board in those conditions.

 

In terms of legitimate advice, take into account the mental and physical health of everyone on board and make sure the conditions fall within appropriate bounds. Sounds like common sense but we all know that isn't common.

 

These two statement are both true,

It takes some time and experience to make the call  and tell 'that person' that today is not the day for them to sail... or just decide not to do it. The good outcome here is that everyone survived this time.

I have made some stupid calls in my life (and on occasion been fortunate that no casualties resulted), I like to think I have learned from them.

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For your next trip, suggest less excitable crew. Understand this gentleman is available and comes highly recommended.

8B9D2E90-699C-43F0-BF52-28A6FF6D8389.jpeg

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Fish, you just learnt a little about the awesome responsibility that comes with being a skipper. You need to think about this the next time you wanna look cool.

There is no excuse for taking out newbies in conditions that caused you all to step down out of your boat. Just to clarify that, in conditions that you weren't able to handle, not the newbies, I've had 12yr old newbies out in 30+ knots without issues.

The reason your main became a mess is because you either didn’t lash it to the boom or did a shit job of it. 

If you’re short handed and need more hands, leave some sail up for control and hove to the boat ffs. 

We’ve all been caught by crew going down unexpectedly leaving you short handed in really shitty conditions, if you can’t manage then you failed as the skipper. 

Harsh it may sound, but the buck stops with you sport. I hope like fuck you already been to offer a heartfelt apology to your crew. 

Glad to hear you all made it ok. 
 

 

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On 5/22/2020 at 12:11 AM, FishFood said:

I was the only person capable of navigating the boat (tons of weather helm and the angle of the wind on the waves made us prone to an accidental gybe while navigating the waves) 

One for your lessons learnt session....why do you think you had so much weather helm? 

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6 hours ago, FishFood said:

 

For those that whine about risking CG lives, feel free to take a look at the picture they posted in the press release. They were about as happy as could be to actually be able to do their job and help out. Talk to some coasties sometime and I'm sure you'll find the "never take risks and never call the CG" crowd is almost nonexistent. If the likely outcome is going to require assistance then of course avoid the situation. However, I did not believe that to be the case and I don't think it would be the case with the vast majority of passengers. 

I think there's a distinction to be made here. It's not that they aren't happy to do their jobs, on the contrary, like you say, they are more than happy to help. I've experienced it myself, capsized that Hobie 16 that was my first boat; out in conditions I shouldn't have been trying to sail solo in at my level of experience (about 5 years ago).  They were more than gracious and even somewhat encouraging. 

 

Whether they're happy or not doesn't really factor in to the fact that we, as hopefully responsible skippers, should not require them to be out risking their lives at all. It's not a matter of their willingness or ability to do the job, it's the fact that through our bad decisions we have the chance of killing someone. It *does* happen. 

 

https://komonews.com/weather/scotts-weather-blog/coast-guard-to-hold-memorial-service-honoring-those-killed-in-line-of-duty

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/coast-guard-officer-injured-in-alaska-rescue-dies/

https://www.nytimes.com/1997/02/16/us/coast-guard-investigates-how-3-were-killed-in-lifeboat-rescue.html

 

If at all possible, save their abilities for truly unavoidable situations that happened even though you were well prepared. 

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1 hour ago, shaggybaxter said:

One for your lessons learnt session....why do you think you had so much weather helm? 

Lmao actually, @FishFood, did I not mention this when you wanted to go out past the harbor wall at Half Moon Bay? Gotta either reef or have a jib up to be able to steer at all on that boat. 

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On 5/21/2020 at 3:11 PM, FishFood said:

Yeah the weather actually wasn't the main issue and was super variable, you also are seeing the conditions underneath a chopper hovering just 40ft which is disturbing the water below. Our boat was literally fully engulfed in white water at times with mountains disappearing on the horizon. I was fine with this and even giddy at the conditions.

Things went south when a crew member on board had a severe panic attack (coast guard didn't release video of this individual). I was the only person capable of navigating the boat (tons of weather helm and the angle of the wind on the waves made us prone to an accidental gybe while navigating the waves) and the only crew member who could help with anything was dealing with the person down below. After about three hours of this person being in duress and puking all over the boat, we called to have her medevaced. We were planning on staying with the boat until the medevac got there and we had to depower. After we had taken down the main, the chopper blew it into a mess and we were being tossed around uncontrollably. The loss of steeage noted was just toward the end and was due to improper trim which couldn't be fixed while dealing with this person and the rescue swimmer, the individual wouldn't jump. I decided to pull the main down and just come to a halt.

By the time this was happening we were in a very bad position to get moving again and decided to leave the boat after the coast guard asked. Had we never had to adjust course and deal with this, we likely would have been fine. The biggest failure on my part is taking someone out in that who had no business being out there under any captain's watch.

I think @shaggybaxter summed up my feelings on the above very well, but one thing I'd mention is that I would take issue with you saying  you were "literally fully engulfed in white water at times with mountains disappearing on the horizon. I was fine with this and even giddy at the conditions." 

 

I've sailed with a ton of skippers - from excellent to terrible, in conditions from flat calm to solid 43knots with huge waves and zero visibility, and none of the skippers I'd place on the good end of the spectrum are those who would be "giddy" at conditions that you describe. 

If conditions were as you claim them to be they are to be treated with absolute respect and require a clear head with calm focus on the decision making process. 

If the "giddyness" is what lead you down the terrible decision making path that lead to this situation, then there's your first problem bud. 

 

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I don't understand why turning around and sailing back into sheltered water was not an option.

Certainly a cascade of poor skill applied to poor decision making.

FB- Doug

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5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

I don't understand why turning around and sailing back into sheltered water was not an option.

Certainly a cascade of poor skill applied to poor decision making.

FB- Doug

Just a guess, but inprevailing conditions there you have to come out often harbor and run down abroad reach to clear a reef. Not a cute tropical reef, a nasty black rock thing that suckers boats in. 
 

to get back would have been upwind in a narrow channel. Singlehanded from the sounds of it. 

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Aside from all the above points, Half Moon Bay ditch out option is Santa Cruz normally, rescue was at 11 PM in the dark, so dark the rescue launch couldn't see the boat.

Where were you headed at that hour in what sounds like a 20 kn Nerly with 15' seas and an inexperienced crew? And a poorly sorted vessel?

You say after 3 hours of this, that implies that you left the breakwater about 8 PM but were unable to return to the harbor , blown south?

What was the plan? Why not just motor sail with a double reefed main slow and under control?

In the future you may find it easier to shake a reef or two than to take a reef or two.

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2 minutes ago, Raz'r said:
5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

I don't understand why turning around and sailing back into sheltered water was not an option.

Certainly a cascade of poor skill applied to poor decision making.

Just a guess, but inprevailing conditions there you have to come out often harbor and run down abroad reach to clear a reef. Not a cute tropical reef, a nasty black rock thing that suckers boats in. 
 

to get back would have been upwind in a narrow channel. Singlehanded from the sounds of it. 

 

That kind of consideration should play into whether or not to leave in the first place. I get the impression that the OP didn't even know that he was making decisions, in the process of getting himself into a position where he thinks "how to get rescued" is a sailorly skill.

I'm all in favor of more people learning to sail, and getting involved with sailing, but that entails learning how. The grand parade of human stupidty doesn't raise much of a cheer when it takes place at sea

FB- Doug

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I just wanted to spread some tips on how to make your medevac ride just a little bit smoother.

What kind of poor excuse of a human that you come on here and try to get more attention for you lack of abilities?  Fuck your attention seeking thread about non-existent "tips"...   go away asshat, you are NO ONE who should be giving out advice.  And it wasn't a "medivac" ride...   it was a rescue from a perfectly good boat with no one onboard, including you, who knew what they were doing and had any business being out there.   Go away and take up Gofund me to get a bicycle so you can ride down the wrong side of the highway.

 

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to get back would have been upwind in a narrow channel. Singlehanded from the sounds of it. 


And something that many have done, day in and out forever.....   once they have experience in handling a boat properly.   

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Until we read testimony to the contrary, we must assume the news report was correct: The rescue was inside Pillar Point Harbor. The outer harbor is nearly a mile across so it is almost like the open sea :-)

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9 hours ago, Icedtea said:

I think @shaggybaxter summed up my feelings on the above very well, but one thing I'd mention is that I would take issue with you saying  you were "literally fully engulfed in white water at times with mountains disappearing on the horizon. I was fine with this and even giddy at the conditions." 

 

I've sailed with a ton of skippers - from excellent to terrible, in conditions from flat calm to solid 43knots with huge waves and zero visibility, and none of the skippers I'd place on the good end of the spectrum are those who would be "giddy" at conditions that you describe. 

If conditions were as you claim them to be they are to be treated with absolute respect and require a clear head with calm focus on the decision making process. 

If the "giddyness" is what lead you down the terrible decision making path that lead to this situation, then there's your first problem bud. 

 

This ^. Having been in a position where from the helm only the mast was visible and holding your breath was helpful a couple of times, giddiness would not be an adjective I would use.

I can only hope that the OP has posted to soon after the event and is still under the stress of the event and will wake after a good sleep with a better perspective of what unfolded and why it happened.

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I would like to point out to the ass wipes on this board that thought his stupid and lucky trip up the coast was funny and worth devoting a shit ton of posts too (joking about movie rights etc.)  All of us in sf bay area knew there was a high probably it was going to end up this way.  Next time think a bit about how you respond to someone as stupid and ignorantly dangerous as fish food.  It may seem harmless and funny but look what happened now.

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7 hours ago, El Boracho said:

Until we read testimony to the contrary, we must assume the news report was correct: The rescue was inside Pillar Point Harbor. The outer harbor is nearly a mile across so it is almost like the open sea :-)

Lol, here is a drift model put together by NOAA (not very accurate apparently as the entire area has been searched).

IMG_1589.thumb.jpg.8aacc72aa2f189fb54a66123d37c39a6.jpg

Does that look like Pillar Point?

We were about 20 miles away and turning upwind to fight back to the harbor would have been a five hour endeavour and this person didn't seem to have five hours.

8 hours ago, solosailor said:

What kind of poor excuse of a human that you come on here and try to get more attention for you lack of abilities?  Fuck your attention seeking thread about non-existent "tips"...   go away asshat, you are NO ONE who should be giving out advice.  And it wasn't a "medivac" ride...   it was a rescue from a perfectly good boat with no one onboard, including you, who knew what they were doing and had any business being out there.   Go away and take up Gofund me to get a bicycle so you can ride down the wrong side of the highway.

 

Lol. Yeah, you're right and a great excuse for a human judging by your post.

I get it. You all make perfect decisions, nothing can be made light of, you're opinions are fact and I'm a shit bag. Got it.

I started the thread on a fucking light note, big fucking whoop.

Read the fucking CG reported conditions.

So dark they couldn't see us with NVGs, 15ft seas, 20mph sustained... Let me cut off your motor function and leave you handling a half tonner downwind solo in those conditions. My arm was wrestling a loaded tiller and my mind wrestling how to deal with the situation at hand. I wasn't just sailing you sacks of shit. 

You fuck twats have so little information, weren't there, don't understand the details which I won't get into (for the individuals privacy) and are saying this shit behind a fucking keyboard.

Thanks to the individuals who are a little more understanding and a big fuck you to the rest.

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19 minutes ago, FishFood said:

Lol, here is a drift model put together by NOAA (not very accurate apparently as the entire area has been searched).

IMG_1589.thumb.jpg.8aacc72aa2f189fb54a66123d37c39a6.jpg

Does that look like Pillar Point?

We were about 20 miles away and turning upwind to fight back to the harbor would have been a five hour endeavour and this person didn't seem to have five hours.

Lol. Yeah, you're right and a great excuse for a human judging by your post.

I get it. You all make perfect decisions, nothing can be made light of, you're opinions are fact and I'm a shit bag. Got it.

I started the thread on a fucking light note, big fucking whoop.

Read the fucking CG reported conditions.

So dark they couldn't see us with NVGs, 15ft seas, 20mph sustained... Let me cut off your motor function and leave you handling a half tonner downwind solo in those conditions. My arm was wrestling a loaded tiller and my mind wrestling how to deal with the situation at hand. I wasn't just sailing you sacks of shit. 

You fuck twats have so little information, weren't there, don't understand the details which I won't get into (for the individuals privacy) and are saying this shit behind a fucking keyboard.

Thanks to the individuals who are a little more understanding and a big fuck you to the rest.

Why the fuck did you go out? It’s not like we didn’t know it was windy as shit the last few days. Friday was the annual (cancelled) Spin Cup. I played with my routings all day. Was blowing high 20s. And not a surprise.

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A boat that washes ashore at 0100 PDT at Big Sur is not apt to be seen or found. Beaten to shards by dawn. Perhaps pieces later collected by beachcombers.

You write “So dark...”, that is common at night. Moonrise was at 5:21.

Also, you write “pretty fun”, “almost giddy”, and “I was fine with this”. Yet you are annoyed by a some harmless ridicule on SA? What did you expect? You have trouble with forecasting...

Kinda surprised you found a woman that consented to being with you on a boat. That is progress.

 

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38 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Why the fuck did you go out? It’s not like we didn’t know it was windy as shit the last few days. Friday was the annual (cancelled) Spin Cup. I played with my routings all day. Was blowing high 20s. And not a surprise.

A bad decision on my part. As has been pointed out and admitted to.

8 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

A boat that washes ashore at 0100 PDT at Big Sur is not apt to be seen or found. Beaten to shards by dawn. Perhaps pieces later collected by beachcombers.

You write “So dark...”, that is common at night. Moonrise was at 5:21.

Also, you write “pretty fun”, “almost giddy”, and “I was fine with this”. Yet you are annoyed by a some harmless ridicule on SA? What did you expect? You have trouble with forecasting...

Kinda surprised you found a woman that consented to being with you on a boat. That is progress.

 

Lol again. Some is harmless ridicule and other comments are far from that.

All for the banter, some of this isn't banter. 

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10 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

A boat that washes ashore at 0100 PDT at Big Sur is not apt to be seen or found. Beaten to shards by dawn. Perhaps pieces later collected by beachcombers.

You write “So dark...”, that is common at night. Moonrise was at 5:21.

Also, you write “pretty fun”, “almost giddy”, and “I was fine with this”. Yet you are annoyed by a some harmless ridicule on SA? What did you expect? You have trouble with forecasting...

Kinda surprised you found a woman that consented to being with you on a boat. That is progress.

 

The red dots represent possible crash sites vs the black possible locations in the water. There was little chance it hit yesterday according to the model and I don't believe the model is very accurate anyhow. We have had two seperate CG fights fail to spot it. Nothing spotted by vessel either. 

The marine sanctuary has also been on the lookout for it and tracking possible crash sites. Nothing so far.

The CG has deemed the boat low risk for environmental harm. 

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2 hours ago, FishFood said:

I get it. You all make perfect decisions, nothing can be made light of, you're opinions are fact and I'm a shit bag. Got it.

Most of the folks on this forum never need rescue because their only sailing is from behind a keyboard. 

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3 hours ago, FishFood said:

turning upwind to fight back to the harbor would

Where was your jib?

3 hours ago, FishFood said:

So dark they couldn't see us with NVGs, 15ft seas, 20mph sustained

And? So it was pitch dark and you were in a perfectly capable yacht....I'm missing the problem here. 

3 hours ago, FishFood said:

Let me cut off your motor function and leave you handling a half tonner downwind solo

You don't use your motor downwind. So you can't you handle a half tonner downwind solo...where the fuck did you think you were going? Outside the environment? 

3 hours ago, FishFood said:

My arm was wrestling a loaded tiller and my mind wrestling how to deal with the situation at hand

Are you trying to be a dick? Why were you wrestling the tiller, was it because of the 'tons of weather helm'? Why did you have tons of weather helm on a half tonner which IMO generally balance really well? 

I was quite sympathetic, but you're acting just like a vacuous spoilt bitch. You can't handle a bit of home truth well fuck off back to Softcock Anarchy. You want some truths, how about this for a guess :

  • You took out some chick and no-name because it was windy, you got a hard-on thinking how cool and tough you would look and you wanted to impress her or them.    
  • You didn't plan at all, you just left. Did you even have an EPIRB? Ring the CG with a passage plan? Set a jib? 
  • You had a crew member go down and couldn't render proper assistance because you'd exceeded your capability in what I'd call pretty normal shitty conditions. 
  • You couldn't tuck in a reef or set a jib because you didn't plan, instead you waited till everything went to shit and then you couldn't think straight.
  • You stepped down off a perfectly functioning sailboat. Why? Because your're unskilled, impulsive and dangerous with an ego that outstrips your skills.

Go back through these threads and read up on real skippers reports that have lost boats at sea, they are the complete opposite of your whiny little bitch attitude you are displaying here. You're an insult to them and to us. And you dare to call yourself a skipper?

Fuck off back to dry land until you grow some responsibility Fish, no wonder you got yourself and your crew in the shit.  You aren't fit to hold a tiller yet. 

  

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1 hour ago, FishFood said:

The CG has deemed the boat low risk for environmental harm. 

Now that you're not on it.

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1 hour ago, shaggybaxter said:

Where was your jib?

And? So it was pitch dark and you were in a perfectly capable yacht....I'm missing the problem here. 

You don't use your motor downwind. So you can't you handle a half tonner downwind solo...where the fuck did you think you were going? Outside the environment? 

Are you trying to be a dick? Why were you wrestling the tiller, was it because of the 'tons of weather helm'? Why did you have tons of weather helm on a half tonner which IMO generally balance really well? 

I was quite sympathetic, but you're acting just like a vacuous spoilt bitch. You can't handle a bit of home truth well fuck off back to Softcock Anarchy. You want some truths, how about this for a guess :

  • You took out some chick and no-name because it was windy, you got a hard-on thinking how cool and tough you would look and you wanted to impress her or them.    
  • You didn't plan at all, you just left. Did you even have an EPIRB? Ring the CG with a passage plan? Set a jib? 
  • You had a crew member go down and couldn't render proper assistance because you'd exceeded your capability in what I'd call pretty normal shitty conditions. 
  • You couldn't tuck in a reef or set a jib because you didn't plan, instead you waited till everything went to shit and then you couldn't think straight.
  • You stepped down off a perfectly functioning sailboat. Why? Because your're unskilled, impulsive and dangerous with an ego that outstrips your skills.

Go back through these threads and read up on real skippers reports that have lost boats at sea, they are the complete opposite of your whiny little bitch attitude you are displaying here. You're an insult to them and to us. And you dare to call yourself a skipper?

Fuck off back to dry land until you grow some responsibility Fish, no wonder you got yourself and your crew in the shit.  You aren't fit to hold a tiller yet. 

  

I think FF was hoping to have people hero worshiping him because he is way more experienced than most of us, at getting rescued.
 

it was lucky for the CG that they got to do a rescue in pretty sedate conditions. 

 

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A bit in his defense - if there is one thing on a boat that I fear more than storms, reefs, UFOs, or Russian submarines, it is a crew member panicking or psyching out. It is almost impossible to estimate  how people would react in extreme situations until you’re there. 

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I’m firmly with Shaggybaxter on this, with being a captain comes responsibility and a little seamanship.

When the going gets tough, the tough get going,  yes it’s a cliche but they do not punch the red button and helo out because if they have to jump off the boat.

Was always taught the only way you should leave a boat is if you have to move “up “ to the life raft and remembering that in some cases that is really not a great option, that’s why you have a grab bag on board because the food in the life raft and the water is survival stuff And it tastes like shit.

I have in the past invited my crew to a life raft service have had them watch the thing inflate and had them hop into it to sample the options available They would all agree life rafts as opposed to the boat you are on are not generally pleasant places to be.

Jumping off a perfectly ok boat into the briny Should not be an option.
 

When you fail to plan, you plan to fail.

Think today a helo trip is an option that is all too easy, how about making the plan as if a helo will not be showing up.

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5 hours ago, FishFood said:

15ft seas, 20mph sustained... 

 

I don't usually jump on the bandwagon here, especially since I've met you in person, but 15 ft seas and 20 mph (not knots?) sustained is honestly fairly chill, especially downwind. Your half tonner definitely has more sail area, but 12-14 foot seas and 25 occassionally gusting 35 knots in my Coronado downwind, mid october near Texada island was just a good day sailing. Reef in the main and the 90% jib, hid at a little cove halfway up the east side the first night, and blasted the 8 miles to Van Anda the next day. 

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5 hours ago, Starboard!! said:

Most of the folks on this forum never need rescue because their only sailing is from behind a keyboard. 

And many more have circumnavigated. YMMV

 

2 hours ago, Vaeredil said:
8 hours ago, FishFood said:

15ft seas, 20mph sustained... 

 

I don't usually jump on the bandwagon here, especially since I've met you in person, but 15 ft seas and 20 mph (not knots?) sustained is honestly fairly chill, especially downwind. Your half tonner definitely has more sail area, but 12-14 foot seas and 25 occassionally gusting 35 knots in my Coronado downwind, mid october near Texada island was just a good day sailing. Reef in the main and the 90% jib, hid at a little cove halfway up the east side the first night, and blasted the 8 miles to Van Anda the next day

^this^

Boat, equipment, and skills ALL have to be capable of handling a range of normal to rougher-then-normal conditions. Beginners often will return from a brisk sail with the impression that they've conquered a Cape Horn gale. All a normal part of learning.

FB- Doug

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I think most of you are missing the point. The emergency wasn’t the weather/waves, but that Fish Food wasn’t prepared to single hand the boat AND deal with a hysterical woman.
 

It didn’t have autopilot or windvane steering, may not have been possible to reef from cockpit, etc... And the other guy sounds like he was useless.

And personally I am not entirely sure what you do legally, if someone absolutely freaks out. Can you tie them up, or is kidnapping then? The USCG is generally quick to pull the trigger on rescue, because that’s their job and they like it. 

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1 hour ago, Starboard!! said:

I think most of you are missing the point. The emergency wasn’t the weather/waves, but that Fish Food wasn’t prepared to single hand the boat AND deal with a hysterical woman.
 

It didn’t have autopilot or windvane steering, may not have been possible to reef from cockpit, etc... And the other guy sounds like he was useless.

And personally I am not entirely sure what you do legally, if someone absolutely freaks out. Can you tie them up, or is kidnapping then? The USCG is generally quick to pull the trigger on rescue, because that’s their job and they like it. 

Fair enough, makes sense. Hey @FishFood, was it Mike and a girlfriend or someone else?? That coastguard photo is hard to make out faces. 

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OK, you were protected by the patron saint of drunks,  sailors and the incompetent.

Settle for that and please don't bother him again.

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2 hours ago, Starboard!! said:

I think most of you are missing the point. The emergency wasn’t the weather/waves, but that Fish Food wasn’t prepared to single hand the boat AND deal with a hysterical woman.
 

It didn’t have autopilot or windvane steering, may not have been possible to reef from cockpit, etc... And the other guy sounds like he was useless.

And personally I am not entirely sure what you do legally, if someone absolutely freaks out. Can you tie them up, or is kidnapping then? The USCG is generally quick to pull the trigger on rescue, because that’s their job and they like it. 

Ok, fair point... also circles back to the issue of skipper's competence and decision-making.

You never really know how people are going to react in a new, stressful situation. Dealing with a hysterical crew is an unexpectd and severe demand.

However there is nothing that is helped by incompetent boat handling; in fact I wonder if the person on board (originally intended to be crew? Not sure) became hysterical because they were faced with the realization that here they were stuck on a big dark scary ocean with an incompetent. I've trained crew (something that more skippers need to recognize as a needful skill) and I've calmed crew and I've deliberately done/said things to inspire confidence in crew. In some ways it's part of the fun, play-acting sort of, and in some ways it's simply part of earning the title "skipper."

FB- Doug

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Not to keep heaping on the OP, but. 

When I moved up from a J24 to an old IOR 38', I had an ambitious race schedule. Perhaps to ambitious. In trying to take the boat South to Seattle for a weekend regatta, I was not finished with all of my maintenance issues. The big one still on the list was cleaning the fuel tank and injectors for the Yanmar diesel.

Motoring South into a forecast of 15-25 SE through Admiralty inlet is always a crap shoot, as it can go up or down quite quickly. We were in 4-6 seas in the South end of Rosario Strait when the sediment in the tank decided it was time to foul the injectors. My delivery crew was my wife and a longtime crew member. He went below to bleed injectors while I hoisted a reefed main and unfurled the 90% delivery jib. It was only another 3 miles to Port Townsend and I figured two tacks would bring us in and we could get the engine issues sorted. 

Then the wind shut off. We were in 0-2 knots and I could see it was starting to build in Admiralty inlet and was moving quickly our direction, when my longtime crewmember came up on deck looking very green around the gills. He was laying on the deck, puking and I gave my wife the helm and furled the furled the jib (thinking being to unfurl after main was secured)and went forward to drop the main when the Southerly slammed into us. At about 30 knots.

The boat slammed over and spun into an uncontrolled tack, then jibe as it threw my wife across the cockpit. In the jibe the boom snagged the running back and stopped short of fully out ( remember, everything was slacked for dropping the main) The main ripped right above the second set of reef points, from leech to luff. At this point I regain the cockpit.

We have a perfect line for a dead downwind run into Skyline marina, which becomes our new destination. My lovely bride, as she has been know to do, is asking if she can call the CG (Not sure why she is always asking that). My longtime crew is still face down on the deck with a death grip on a stanchion, asking for us to push him overboard so he may die.

I consent to my bride contacting the CG as an advisory of our status and location. Winds are now gusting to 50 and we are in 8-10 breaking seas. CG upon contact advises to continue as they are unable to affect rescue at this time due to conditions. 

We sail into the marina (after an interesting discussion on the phone with a girl who says we cannot tie up there as they have no guest slips available). I do two 360's to kill speed and slide in, head to wind, on an open end tie.

Things done wrong- deferred maintenance (although I had new standing rigging), insufficient delivery crew for a new to me boat, pushing the weather window, and a few more 

Things down right- bailouts identified prior to departure, dock lines run forward and secured amidships for quick deployment (I know this is debatable for  some, but always worked for me), sufficient skill set for handling conditions. 

And a great deal of luck. 

 

I truly believe 80-90% of the sailors on the site could have handled this same scenario. I have never posted this before as I thought it was pretty stupid on my part and I should have made better decisions.

 

When you take the role of Captain of vessel, you are responsible for everyone and everything. If you are not ready for that. Don't leave the dock. 

 

PS- Highlights, besides the laughter at the girl on the phone at the marina, was the porpoise that paced us for about a minute, looking over at us like;  WTF are you doing out here? Oh Yeah, the look on my wife's face when the CG said they couldn't come get us (We have been in heavy weather before and she always is asking to call the CG. She doesn't bother anymore, but she also doesn't sail with me on bad days either)

 

WL

 

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26 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

You never really know how people are going to react in a new, stressful situation. Dealing with a hysterical crew is an unexpectd and severe demand.

What hysterical crew? Hysterical passenger more like it.

you have to wonder what sort of moron would go to sea for an overnight sail with a passenger who has not been tested in such conditions.

 

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8 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

...but you're acting just like a vacuous spoilt bitch. You can't handle a bit of home truth well fuck off back to Softcock Anarchy. You want some truths...You aren't fit to hold a tiller yet. 

Literary skilz! I wish I could turn words like that.  

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3 hours ago, Starboard!! said:

I think most of you are missing the point. The emergency wasn’t the weather/waves, but that Fish Food wasn’t prepared to single hand the boat AND deal with a hysterical woman.

We don't know what the point was. Knowing the history can we guess it was to get the boat back to MDR? The dubious northbound experience should have informed about the exhaustion and mayhem possibilities. The common element of a FishFood adventure is  bodily fluids in the cabin.

Why abandon a perfectly good boat? Even Rimas could have gently coerced the drifting eastward a bit to lawn-dart into Monterey.

The helo video didn't capture the reported weather conditions. Not even a passing whitecap? Likely more story as yet untold.

From the archives:
On 11/1/2019 at 6:55 PM, FishFood said:

I’m setting sail from Marina del Rey to Half Moon Bay tomorrow with very little sailing experience...zero offshore boating experience...a jet-ski. I wanted to let you all...tell me I’m retarded, and get some tips for the sail. ... electric inboard and no solar. Using iPad chart plotter...Figure you guys can setup a betting pool on whether I end up dead, run aground...

 

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1 hour ago, The Dark Knight said:

What hysterical crew? Hysterical passenger more like it.

you have to wonder what sort of moron would go to sea for an overnight sail with a passenger who has not been tested in such conditions.

 

Someone who was thinking that a night sail may be romantic and he may get his dick wet as the third drives the boat.

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I suspect this all relates to the thread started by TetraMin (fish food) a few days ago about delivering a 30 footer (Freedom ex-Scorpion) to Mexico that was gifted to him by Fish Food. 

May well have been a trolling thread started by Fish Food.

So may not have been an overnight sail but a poorly planned and executed delivery IF TetraMin and Fish Food are not one and the same.

Here is a photo at the end of thread showing what appears to be the CG helo and crew with the "crew" of Scorpion

IMG_08621.thumb.jpg.d4f98937394c46ad422d97f6a3309944.jpg

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8 hours ago, basketcase said:

Someone who was thinking that a night sail may be romantic and he may get his dick wet as the third drives the boat.

Her hysterics mean that she wasn’t going to be helming the boat in the cockpit alone. Bad luck for FF & TM.

 

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18 hours ago, 12 metre said:

I suspect this all relates to the thread started by TetraMin (fish food) a few days ago about delivering a 30 footer (Freedom ex-Scorpion) to Mexico that was gifted to him by Fish Food. 

May well have been a trolling thread started by Fish Food.

So may not have been an overnight sail but a poorly planned and executed delivery IF TetraMin and Fish Food are not one and the same.

Here is a photo at the end of thread showing what appears to be the CG helo and crew with the "crew" of Scorpion

IMG_08621.thumb.jpg.d4f98937394c46ad422d97f6a3309944.jpg

I wonder if they keep the CG coveralls?

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Looks like everything worked out for the three smug attention whores.

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There's a story about Ted Kennedy and a couple friends who found conditions rough and left the boat at a distant marina. When he walked in the house his father asked where the boat was left.  And then told him to go back and get it.

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A concise and accurate summary

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If he hadn't killed or abandoned dog, dog could have swum nutso woman to shore. 

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Let me cut off your motor function and leave you handling a half tonner downwind solo in those conditions. My arm was wrestling a loaded tiller and my mind wrestling how to deal with the situation at hand. I wasn't just sailing you sacks of shit. 

I'd do fine thanks as would most ALL of us could deal with the motor being "cut off".   Do you know why the motor failed?   Lack of knowledge and preparation.  Come call me a sack of shit to my face tosser, poseur, wannabe sailor and attention WHORE.  I believe you won't be satisfied until you've killed others only so you can have a "story" to tell.   Many sail without a motor all over the world your fucking you dunce.   You are a hazard.  Get a Tesla and have it drive for you because you have NO BUSINESS operating a 25 cent candy machine let alone a multi-ton vehicle of any kind.  You are a fucking little boy with delusions of stardom, not a sailor, not a person worth respect, certainly not a man.  You took inexperienced people out on a bad day and put them and the USCG in danger.  Did I say fuck you?   Well FUCK YOU.  An unprepared boat, unexperienced and near zero knowledge skipper who thinks the conditions are "giddy" but he was "dealing with the situation".    Name the time and place.

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In defense of FF, his first post was a crap attempt at making light of what must have been a seriously concerning event, without giving himself time to get over it.

The second thing is, they all survived. To me this is a big thing. There were a multitude of ways this could have been dealt with and a similar number of outcomes. I have always worked on the idea that no deaths or major injuries means the correct decisions were made. Anyone not there at the time is purely guessing on what woulda, coulda happened.

I can recall two major events in my time where it could have easily finished in total lose of boat and crew. Both times, one small thing not going as planned would have been not a good thing. Both times there was no chance of calling for help, so never had to throw that into the mix. Both times have had discussions with others afterwards to get ideas of what other choices could have been made. But when it's happening you don't have the luxery of sitting at the bar with a cold beer, talking with others you respect. It just has to happen. Now.

Much like the CG asking them to decide, now, on or off. They don't want to have to come back out later, which is fair enough, gutsy call to just say nah, I'm good once the panic person is gone. Despite the stress and weariness that hits you the moment you feel you are safe.

So FF, learn from it. You didn't do bad because you are all alive and well. Some of the comments on here are phrased rather harshly, but can still be considered in the light of day as other possible choices you could have made. Some of those have probably never been in a situation where you have to discuss how to try and get off when/if it gets worse. But they may still have an idea worth considering. Then there are the abusive blowhards, just a bunch of wankers, you can just ignore those assholes. Need to stop now, my thumbs are getting sore.

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In defense of FF, his first post was a crap attempt at making light of what must have been a seriously concerning event, without giving himself time to get over it.

He should have left with his tail between his legs in shame and learned something, not post an immature, snarky, sad attempt at humor for a life risking rescue by the USCG.   Making light?   He fucking basically mocked the situation....  money for fucking Big Macs?  I hope he fucking chokes on a BigMac so others won't be put in danger.  No excuse for his behavior or his sad attention seeking.  

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