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ok, you pizza makers out there,  i know a lot of you probably make killer homemade pizza...  i've started recently.... the one tonight was not bad,  crust came out well..

what i was having problem with is getting the dough out to the size i wanted it..  i'm not into throwing the dough (yet)  but when i was making my pie, the dough wanted to keep snapping back in to make it thicker than i wanted to..  what do i need to do.... and no, I'm not calling one of the chains, at $20 for pizza, i'm making my own.

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Good dough for pizza may only stretch so far until it becomes uncooperative. From a ball (refrigerated) mine will get to about 5 inches in the first try. It can be made bigger but as you found will shrink back. So...Then I wait a while. 20 minutes or more. Then it can be pushed, thrown, or rolled out to pizza size. But could take two rests if going for a really thin deal.

It means you have the good hard flour. Rock on!

Snaggs may be correct as well...lotsa variables...lotsa ways to make great pizza.

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Best if you have room temp dough. There's nothing wrong with refrigerated dough as old as a week as long as you bring it back to room temp, punch it down, ball it up and let it grow till time to toss it. 

If you like it round, crimping the edge in your hands should be a good start to stretching it. I don't like rollers, but they work if well floured and you are persistant. You don't have to toss it if you stretch it gently on your fists and just work your way around letting gravity do it's thang.

Lately I've been very happy stretching a 1 lb ball to roughly fit an 8"x12" steel pan, let it breath for 1/2 hour then forcing it into the corners. Load it up, let it grow another 1/2 hour, my oven only gets to 550 (antique gas stove) but it seems to cook well regardless, just not the best bottom char like with a good pizza oven.

I've only just recently started making pizzas because nothing we bought or ever tried to make came anywhere near as good as what I remember making as a kid at Gina's Pizza in Corona Del Mar, Ca. and I have some time on my hands. Wifey is just as happy to buy a ball of who know's what dough from the town store, but I got all the time in the world and great memories and have been really surprised at the results.

Lately it's pizza twice a week. I'll pay for it when the gym opens 6/11.

 

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Dough relaxer.

 I like a thincrust, so build it that way. Very little tomato sauce, a good dose of basil and oregano before the garlic. then the parm, then and meats. Finally mushrooms and onions on top of the mooz. Cok it HOT so the bottom is seared and the blisters on top are brown Anything less you might as well go to Dominoes.

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If you really want to make it right get a bread machine to make the dough.  Use bread flour.  Lots of good dough recipes out there.  Doesn't take long. The dough's at room temperature and you'll be spinning it in the air before you know it.

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1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

Dough relaxer.

 I like a thincrust, so build it that way. Very little tomato sauce, a good dose of basil and oregano before the garlic. then the parm, then and meats. Finally mushrooms and onions on top of the mooz. Cok it HOT so the bottom is seared and the blisters on top are brown Anything less you might as well go to Dominoes.

dough is warm,  i'm just learning how to work it...   mix it for 3 mins, 15 min rest, little more kneading and then into a flowered bowl with towel for a couple of hours, split it in two,  save one,  work the other into a pie (this is where i'm having issues)     i bought a 22" cast iron griddle, it goes into the oven , 500*, as the oven warms up,   this is when i go make the pie..  i get a good cook on the bottom and the crust is cooked through, just not as thin as i want it...  like a 1/4"

 

ps..  i've been mixing 00 flour w/ bread flower  50/50... as recommended by a friend / recipe...  i like the texture and flavor so sticking with that

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and i need a pizza peel...  the wood cutting board is a little small and kind of thick, it's hard to slide off cleanly....   anyone make a diy..

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9 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

ps..  i've been mixing 00 flour w/ bread flower  50/50... as recommended by a friend / recipe...  i like the texture and flavor so sticking with that

The 00 flour blend was going to be my next try. Good to hear a first hand recco. I'd also recently tried leaving the dough slightly moist (per an online recipe) and oddly, liked it hot out of the oven but made for terribly tough breakfast pizza the next AM. And breaky pizza is the best pizza. Just sayin'.

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41 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

and i need a pizza peel...  the wood cutting board is a little small and kind of thick, it's hard to slide off cleanly....   anyone make a diy..

A spread of Semolina flour on the working surface is supposed to help with that problem

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D3cOhWc.jpg

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1 hour ago, VWAP said:

D3cOhWc.jpg

i'd eat that..

 

hobot,  yeah i've been doing the flour , going to try corn meal next,  i just need something that doesn't have a 3/4" drop off..   my wife suggested  a rimless cookie sheet she has ...  trying that next as it has the size / thinness / and i don't have to make it..

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5 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

and i need a pizza peel...  the wood cutting board is a little small and kind of thick, it's hard to slide off cleanly....   anyone make a diy..

Take cookie sheet, turn upside-down, and you get a fairly thin, peel-substitute.  I want a peel too.

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I used to make my pies from a Pillsbury dough recipe. Simple to make. I took the handle off of a Teflon pan and put the mixed dough in it along with 1/4 lb of ground meat and baked that for 20 minutes before pulling it out of the oven and adding sauce cheese and more meat on top for another 10 minutes.

 As the pizza crust bakes, the edge curls in at the top and when you cut it into slices, the crust make a great holder as the pizza disappears!

Bouno Apetito!!

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BTW, tossing and spinning the dough is an act, and in fact tends to make the dough tough and leathery. When it is properly mixed and kneaded it should have the consistency of a young woman's breast. Firm, but yielding, and with a bit of spring back.

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One does not need to buy a bunch of pizza specific hardware to make great pizzas. Semolina flour does work well for surfaces and it seems to take much of the char and then fall away if that suits one's cooking style. Corn meal is sacrilege, no?. Corn is for feeding pigs.

To solve the pizza peel problem, and greatly simplify the whole process, one can plop the dough onto the heated cooking surface before toppings are added. I cook the nude dough for a minute to dry out the upper side because I prefer that the sauce not make a layer of soft undercooked dough...but tastes vary. Of course one wants to arrange the process so the topping can be installed very quickly.

To get the dough from the breadboard, a rough slab of ancient redwood cut nearby, to the smoking pan can be simplified by folding it in half or quarters then unfolding in the pan. Seems kinda criminal but works out fine. Depends, of course, but other tech can easily go haywire.

I use a large heavy iron sauté pan. Nasty old seasoning like an old BBQ grill. Heated on medium until it is hot to the edges and smoking. The toppings are prepared while it is getting hot. Plop in the dough. Cover for a minute or two to make beautiful puffy bubbles and harden the top a bit. Somewhere in there it is turned to low...kinda depends on how wet the dough was...to prevent uncontrolled burning. The sauce and toppings are installed. I tend towards the minimal. The sexy filipina tends towards a mountain of cheese and enough greasy meat to choke a dog. She tries for neatness. I like a certain optimal quantity of goodies flopping over the perfectly formed edges and sizzling in the pan. We are incompatible but suffer thru it.

Filipino pizza, actually all the bread, is a disgusting thing, by the way. All the domestic style bread is barely baked. Not even close. Why? Because severe lack of teeth in the population. So I treat all the filipino bread products like the 'cook at home' stuff in America: Re-cook it at home.

Anyway after the toppings go on it is re-covered in the pan on low (the heavy pan remains scorching hot) for a few minutes. Just to make sure the bottom is approaching perfect. Did I mention that robust red wine is being swilled all along? At some point the pie is slid outta the pan onto a round aluminum cookie sheet like thing that is also pretty well battle worn. It has been pre-heating in the convection oven set to SpaceX Launch Broil. I suppose a regular oven would work but the convection oven seems to be happy broiling and baking at the same time. Anyway the pizza is finished in there in maybe two minutes, depending. Don't walk away things can change fast here.

The dough never sticks to either nasty pan. Note the whole baking process take only four minutes, maybe five, never timed it due to the drinking.

Just my comments here. Whatever works for anybody is great. Take Italy for example: apparently not a single region has any idea how to cook, absolute garbage, if you talk to any other region.

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2 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

BTW, tossing and spinning the dough is an act, and in fact tends to make the dough tough and leathery. When it is properly mixed and kneaded it should have the consistency of a young woman's breast. Firm, but yielding, and with a bit of spring back.

yeah, it's the spring back i'm fighting..      going with the rimless cookie sheet i mentioned,  besides my friend took his table saw back the other day and i realized i won't have an easy way to build one...      El B,  the cast iron griddle i got, i seasoned pretty well, don't have any issues with it,  but I'll try cooking the dough a little technique, but i'm worried i'll lose a lot of oven temp..

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get one or two Newman's Own Organic's pepperoni pizzas, a red onion, a 1/2 pound of mushrooms, best pork italian sausage, a green bell pepper, and shredded mozarella in a bag

preheat oven to 425F

break the sausage into mini marble sized pieces and slowly saute to get most of the fat out of it without cooking it totally and drain on paper towel, 1.5 sausages for 2 pies

chop 1/3 of the onion and 1/3 of the bell pepper into small dice, rinse the onion and break up the pieces under water in a stainless wire collander and drain on paper towel

chop enough mushrooms to cover both pies totally as these will essentially shrink to a fraction of their raw

take the pies out of the plastic fully frozen and assemble in this order of equally spread elements: sausage, onion, bell pepper, mushrooms

with the mushrooms now covering the pie sprinkle mushrooms with garlic powder and a very light spay of aerosol olive oil

now cover pies with mozarella until the mushrooms just about disappear and get it to the edges

put one oven rack in the highest position and put foil down on the lower rack

slide the frozen pizzas side by side onto the top rack while trying not to drop cheese on the door

save the cardboard for putting the hot pizzas when cooked

set timer for 12 minutes to check, they usually take a little more to get really browned and crispy

using a big spatula scooch the pizzas onto the cardboard rounds and put them on a cooling rack, this is IMPORTANT as if you them on a counter they will steam themselves soggy

wait 5 mins or so and then cut with a wheel cutter

I have made these 100's of times and they are quick and very tasty. Not too heavy and cheesy and very crispy thin crusts. We sometimes get the pies two for $10

 

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I hesitate to educate you heathens because you may diminish the supplies available to me.

The best pizza dough comes from "00" flour.  The "00" refers the milling. "00" being finer than "0" being finer than regular.  Antimo Caputo flour is the most famous and supposedly the most popular in Naples and most of Italy.  However, I've used a few brands and they are similar.  If you have a "regular" oven that only heats to 500 or 550 degrees F, Caputo makes a version called Americana that has a slightly different mix to help it brown and crisp up.  In my experience, it works very well.

There are probably hundreds or thousands of dough recipes and youtube videos or similar showing how to make dough so I'll leave that up to you. Some are elaborate others are simple. The basic dough recipes and making techniques have worked fine for me so I haven't bothered with anything more elaborate.

To the original poster, I think you'll find some better results if you follow the advice above about temperature and if you get some 00 flour.

 

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16 hours ago, Dorado said:

Marry a girl from Naples next time.  :mellow:

Hooked up with a girl from Florence once.. couldn't cook shit...  but with her body, she didn't need to.

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1 hour ago, PurpleOnion said:

I hesitate to educate you heathens because you may diminish the supplies available to me.

The best pizza dough comes from "00" flour.  The "00" refers the milling. "00" being finer than "0" being finer than regular.  Antimo Caputo flour is the most famous and supposedly the most popular in Naples and most of Italy.  However, I've used a few brands and they are similar.  If you have a "regular" oven that only heats to 500 or 550 degrees F, Caputo makes a version called Americana that has a slightly different mix to help it brown and crisp up.  In my experience, it works very well.

There are probably hundreds or thousands of dough recipes and youtube videos or similar showing how to make dough so I'll leave that up to you. Some are elaborate others are simple. The basic dough recipes and making techniques have worked fine for me so I haven't bothered with anything more elaborate.

To the original poster, I think you'll find some better results if you follow the advice above about temperature and if you get some 00 flour.

 

True that real pizza ovens, I mean the ones made of brick, and poured concrete, and tile, fired by old fruit crates, or cord wood get up around 1,000f, and are kept burning 6 days a week, cook an entirely different pie than you can get at home, but a good home made pie on a Friday night is worth pursuing.

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you can cook pretty good 12" thin all scratch pizzas on a gas grill with terra cotta pavers on the grates on full blast

600F easy with my Weber Spirit but again pizzas need to be thin

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4 hours ago, PurpleOnion said:

I hesitate to educate you heathens because you may diminish the supplies available to me.

The best pizza dough comes from "00" flour.  The "00" refers the milling. "00" being finer than "0" being finer than regular.  Antimo Caputo flour is the most famous and supposedly the most popular in Naples and most of Italy.  However, I've used a few brands and they are similar.  If you have a "regular" oven that only heats to 500 or 550 degrees F, Caputo makes a version called Americana that has a slightly different mix to help it brown and crisp up.  In my experience, it works very well.

There are probably hundreds or thousands of dough recipes and youtube videos or similar showing how to make dough so I'll leave that up to you. Some are elaborate others are simple. The basic dough recipes and making techniques have worked fine for me so I haven't bothered with anything more elaborate.

To the original poster, I think you'll find some better results if you follow the advice above about temperature and if you get some 00 flour.

 

see bottom of post #8...   i'm happy with the dough mixture and how i cook....  just need to get the dough out to the thickness i want...  

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17 hours ago, kgs113 said:

Use bread flour. 

I do that - -King Arthur's.  Short of that, I add 10% by weight of Bob's Red Mill gluten to all-purpose flour.  Works great.  Gotta let it relax between stretching.

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On 6/2/2020 at 4:00 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

see bottom of post #8...   i'm happy with the dough mixture and how i cook....  just need to get the dough out to the thickness i want...  

Apologies. I can't give much guidance on the dough spreading process.  Whatever little I learned, I picked up through observation while working in the pizza shop.  Take a dough out, get it into a ball and then flatten the ball until you have a thick disc. Use the heel of your palm or even punch it.  make sure you have enough flour on it to spread it. Some people use thicker milled semolina flour or even cornmeal for this part. you can throw the disc between your palms a few times.  then put it down and spread the perimeter with you fingers, rotating the disc as you go.  Flip it over a few times if you want. Get it to the point where you can lift it on the tops of your hands and spread it that way.  if you rip the dough, just push it together and seal it with some water. It will want pull back, but, at room temp, it should stretch fairly well. If you like mixing 00 with other flours, you may try a lower gluten flour, but I'm just guessing.

Again apologies if all of the above is obvious. There's probably better youtubes for this.  If you're using 00 or similar, you should be able to able to get it fairly thin while retaining some strength.  

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43 minutes ago, PurpleOnion said:

Apologies. I can't give much guidance on the dough spreading process.  Whatever little I learned, I picked up through observation while working in the pizza shop.  Take a dough out, get it into a ball and then flatten the ball until you have a thick disc. Use the heel of your palm or even punch it.  make sure you have enough flour on it to spread it. Some people use thicker milled semolina flour or even cornmeal for this part. you can throw the disc between your palms a few times.  then put it down and spread the perimeter with you fingers, rotating the disc as you go.  Flip it over a few times if you want. Get it to the point where you can lift it on the tops of your hands and spread it that way.  if you rip the dough, just push it together and seal it with some water. It will want pull back, but, at room temp, it should stretch fairly well. If you like mixing 00 with other flours, you may try a lower gluten flour, but I'm just guessing.

Again apologies if all of the above is obvious. There's probably better youtubes for this.  If you're using 00 or similar, you should be able to able to get it fairly thin while retaining some strength.  

See poeste nubber #2                                                                :)

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I abandoned homemade pizza because I couldn't compete with local pizzerias in Chicago.  When I moved down here, I got back into it for a while but I missed Lou Malnati's too much.  When on Tastes of Chicago website and ordered 6 of them.  When the stock gets low, we order some more.  I have yet to even think of making my own anymore.

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13 hours ago, Jules said:

Lou Malnati's

Ah, Lou's.  We hit Lou's after we landed from an EU trip a couple of years ago.  Phoned in our order, hit Binney's for some vino, picked up the pie and  nearly fell asleep in the hotel room while eating it.  Totally worth it.

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We use a local small non-chain pizza place.  It's supposedly Greek pizza, but it is the only one I really like.  11 bucks for a small sausage and mushroom pie.  

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Now you made me hungry and I plan to feed that hunger.

This is real Jersey shore pizza!! Literally, the owner's father had a pizza joint Wildwood and they use their original ingredients and father's recipe!! As a Jersey kid I didn't expect the best.  Carlo's Pizza.

I had to go with Rosa's.  They are in my building and Carlo's is closed for you know what.

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So, itsa pizza night to-night!  Gonna use some idears from this thread, with the added kick of doing it on the Weber charcoal grill.

On a side note, I made a quickie lunch pizza the other day by *totally cheating* -- I used a large flour tortilla for my crust.  Was perfectly fine.

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19 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

I've heard of emergency rooms, emergency response and emergency brakes...This is the first I've heard of emergency dough!

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7 minutes ago, chester said:

I've heard of emergency rooms, emergency response and emergency brakes...This is the first I've heard of emergency dough!

I allwayes try keepe some cashe aronde the house forre emergercies                                      :)

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5 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

I allwayes try keepe some cashe aronde the house forre emergercies                                     

I keep yeast for brewing/baking for just such an emergency.  Beer will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no beer.

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Mrs Paca making a white pizza tonight. She makes the dough (bread flour) two days in advance and keeps it in the fridge.  Have 2 peels, one “pro” model and one I made yrs ago 3/8 ply and used a 7in sander with a soft pad & 100 grit to put a nice bevel on it. Modest amount of corn meal between the peel & pie to slide it off the peel and into the oven. 

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On 6/2/2020 at 12:15 AM, VWAP said:

D3cOhWc.jpg

Whole new take on pepperoni nips

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Nabisco is missing a whole market segment.

91P4uveeGhL._SX679_.jpg

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4 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

make sure they're nice and chewy..

Plesae dointe chiewe them.....       :)

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On 6/3/2020 at 10:36 PM, Jules said:

I abandoned homemade pizza because I couldn't compete with local pizzerias in Chicago.  When I moved down here, I got back into it for a while but I missed Lou Malnati's too much.  When on Tastes of Chicago website and ordered 6 of them.  When the stock gets low, we order some more.  I have yet to even think of making my own anymore.

I would suggest that the issue was that you were using recipes for pizza instead of casserole and hence not compatible with Chicago tastes, but then this thread would devolve into Chicago vs NY pizza anarchy and who wants that?

 

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1 hour ago, PurpleOnion said:

I would suggest that the issue was that you were using recipes for pizza instead of casserole and hence not compatible with Chicago tastes, but then this thread would devolve into Chicago vs NY pizza anarchy and who wants that?

 

always liked the NYC pizzerias because they had a walk-up window to grab a slice on the go

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Pizza stone or steel?

https://www.thekitchn.com/difference-between-pizza-steel-pizza-stone-254856

You guys got me going. I've gone through a few stones and was thinking of trying a steel. Mainly because I have a 4X4 sheet of 1/4" plate that has been sitting outside unused for decades. I can cut a corner off it and spend an hour with a wire wheel. Weld on some handles and season it a bit. If that works I'll get some thicker plate and try that. It's cheap if you get it yourself.

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4 hours ago, PurpleOnion said:

but then this thread would devolve into Chicago vs NY pizza anarchy and who wants that?

John Stewart invited the CEO or Malnati's onto his show.  New York vs Chicago pizza.  It was pretty funny.

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5 hours ago, bmiller said:

Pizza stone or steel?

https://www.thekitchn.com/difference-between-pizza-steel-pizza-stone-254856

You guys got me going. I've gone through a few stones and was thinking of trying a steel. Mainly because I have a 4X4 sheet of 1/4" plate that has been sitting outside unused for decades. I can cut a corner off it and spend an hour with a wire wheel. Weld on some handles and season it a bit. If that works I'll get some thicker plate and try that. It's cheap if you get it yourself.

you'll have to season it...  i went to academy sports and got a 20" cast iron circular griddle...   worked perfectly so far, use it to roast veggies too,  i'll have to do a spatchcocked chicken on it soon..  and it was a whole  $16 ..

 

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Last night........

089D0442-B862-4B46-BF06-A866E3AE7500.jpeg

PB, you our the effing beste, we stille thickeng caminose?

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40 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

PB, you our the effing beste, we stille thickeng caminose?

:D hopefully......

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well I believe I have the dough down and can get it stretched out sufficiently,  but having issues with the peel to cooker ...    I'm using a flat cookie sheet that doesn't have a lip, but I'm guessing the kitchen is too warm and it's causing the dough to get sticky even though I'm using flour / milled corn meal between the sheet and dough..  so do y'all think chilling the cookie sheet in the fridge for awhile will help or  would a wooden peel work better..

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Youse guys are going to an awful lot of trouble to make pizza's that will never be as good as a good pizza joint with a proper oven.

In my experience there is always a good place pretty close. If not then I just eat a burger instead until I'm back in range of a good place.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Youse guys are going to an awful lot of trouble to make pizza's that will never be as good as a good pizza joint with a proper oven.

In my experience there is always a good place pretty close. If not then I just eat a burger instead until I'm back in range of a good place.

I don’t know, it’s about the surface (stone) and heat (really fricking hot)......Then you put on the stuff you like.....and that’s about it. I like our homemade just as good if not better.......B)

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Youse guys are going to an awful lot of trouble to make pizza's that will never be as good as a good pizza joint with a proper oven.

In my experience there is always a good place pretty close. If not then I just eat a burger instead until I'm back in range of a good place.

44 miles of winding two-lane to good enough pizza. Too far and too salty. So youse see it is a serious issue here. With our make-do process of smoking hot iron pan followed by convection oven broiler set on stellar fusion the pizza is 100% authentic. Total cooking time about 4 minutes.

 

1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

well I believe I have the dough down and can get it stretched out sufficiently,  but having issues with the peel to cooker ...    I'm using a flat cookie sheet that doesn't have a lip, but I'm guessing the kitchen is too warm and it's causing the dough to get sticky even though I'm using flour / milled corn meal between the sheet and dough..  so do y'all think chilling the cookie sheet in the fridge for awhile will help or  would a wooden peel work better..

My dough, after forming the pizza is dry on the surface because of the flour.  However resting on a surface the bottom won't stay dry for long as the moistures soaks out. So one must work fast. Have all the toppings ready.

So more flour. (Isn't corn meal for feeding pigs? Sounds like some kind of flyover state corruption of pizza making? Maybe coarse milled semolina is the proper thing?)

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PB,  like El Boro said,   i need to work faster...  the kitchen was really warm, so nothing helped in getting it off the peel onto my cast iron pan..   the pizza was not photo worthy but tastes good..

Sloopy  why pay  $15-20  for a pizza when what i make is  better...  tired of rubbery crust on all the chains... and the artisinal places are outrageous on their prices..  plus i have plenty of time and can put on what i want...

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First, open a can of small chunk pineapple... 

I'll get my coat. 

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20 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Youse guys are going to an awful lot of trouble to make pizza's that will never be as good as a good pizza joint with a proper oven.

In my experience there is always a good place pretty close. If not then I just eat a burger instead until I'm back in range of a good place.

THIS^^^ I do not bake, anything, ever (well, except potatoes).

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20 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

well I believe I have the dough down and can get it stretched out sufficiently,  but having issues with the peel to cooker ...    I'm using a flat cookie sheet that doesn't have a lip, but I'm guessing the kitchen is too warm and it's causing the dough to get sticky even though I'm using flour / milled corn meal between the sheet and dough..  so do y'all think chilling the cookie sheet in the fridge for awhile will help or  would a wooden peel work better..

Use kitchen parchment paper between the  dough and aluminium cookie sheet. It gives you all the time in the world to dress  your  pizza. Paper and pizza slip off the sheet into the oven like greased  lightning . Perfect crust every time. 

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Yeah, getting a dressed pizza into a frying pan would be a trick. I do this: Heat the pan to smoking hot, fold the dough in half or quarter, plop in pan and unfold, shake to flatten, cover, cook for just a minute and turn the heat down, put on the sauce and toppings, the bottom is probably approaching perfect now, if not cover for another minute, slide onto sheet and put under pre-heated broiler (5") two or three minutes. Rather varies depending on thickness.

Took me considerable trial and error (100's). The plain steel pan is seriously heavy...about 5mm. My heavy but thinner 'foo-foo designer stainless' one does not work...just burns.

On the boat, where I don't want to use the oven (and it is a thousand miles to a commercial pizza), I just cover and bake for a while on Low after the initial nuke-ing. Good enough. Maybe I could use a torch to brown the meat and cheeze?

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As LC said: Parchment - my peel is steel and it sticks no matter what. Parchment is easy and the crust cooks perfectly. A wooden peel will indeed stick less - that's why most peels are wood.

I have a stone stone and a cast iron pizza stone. Like the cast far better. Also makes a pretty good griddle for smashing burgers on...  Used old tiles before I got fancy and bought the stones. 

Dough gets made in the stand mixer, 1.5 hours rise, I get three pizzas out of 4c or so of flour.  Oven as hot as it'll go, or the grill as hot as it'll go. 

SWMBO likes cracker-thin margherita pizza, and I started using the parchment because it's so thin it's almost impossible to move any other way.

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El Boro..   not using a frying pan,  it's one of these..  it goes into the oven while it's heating up... get a great well cooked crust...   i'm going to keep trying.. 

ps.  it's about 20"s across,  got mine at academy sports for about $16

 

 

 

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I use 30 mm granite slab for cooking on. Cut outs from countertops. Square them off to fit convection oven , one above and one below , turn oven up to max 525 + for a few hours. Lots of thermal mass. Crusty crust and beautifully browned cheese and toppings.

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14 hours ago, Zonker said:

First, open a can of small chunk pineapple... 

I'll get my coat. 

Don’t forget your hat. Pineapple on a pizza indeed. You put ketchup on your hot dog?  

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1 hour ago, Al Paca said:

  You put ketchup on your hot dog?  

it's funny, but I do...   not all of them...  gulden's brown on others..   or if i'm in NYC, whatever McSorely's has in the mugs..

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1 hour ago, Al Paca said:

Don’t forget your hat. Pineapple on a pizza indeed. You put ketchup on your hot dog?  

You never heard of Hawaii?

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