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AnotherSailor

How About Some Spring Lines

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1 hour ago, WhoaTed said:

I’ve very often flaked dock line ends chain sinnet-style (also known as monkey braid): quick and easy to flake, quick and easy to shake out,

I thought I was anal about rope...

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

I thought I was anal about rope...

Really Jack, far easier and faster than a Flemish or most other methods; takes a handful of seconds to “monkey” a few feet of line and no time to shake it out. Might look complicated but super simple once you see how it’s done, I’ve always been surprised it’s not more widely used.

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On 6/8/2020 at 2:34 PM, axolotl said:

I may get flamed for saying this, but flemish coils on the dock are stupid, except on opening day. 

Flemish coils are *always* stupid.  I do a loose chainstitch, and leave the loose end prominent.  Grab, pull and go.

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On 6/8/2020 at 8:23 PM, carcrash said:

If the boat is in a finger slip, and the forward dock cleats are forward of the bow cleat(s), an the aft dock cleats are aft of the stern cleats, then again, no spring lines are needed.

This.  Also, I am at a floating dock, so water levels are not a factor as the boat and the fingers move up and down together.

Using spring lines in my situation would be an affectation.

I do carry extra mooring lines aboard, and set spring lines when visiting other places that may be set up differently.

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On 6/12/2020 at 5:13 AM, jack_sparrow said:

Will the "spring line" end up like the dinnasour, extinct and forgotton in the annals of maritime history? Only time will tell.

From The Spring University. :lol:

Geez, Jack.  Have some more gin or something.

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12 hours ago, JohnMB said:

The physics for this doesn't make sense to me for a straight dock, can you draw a free body diagram to show how this works. 

image.png.b19ada68ab72a8fe2e8c1dc18b614ce8.png

Red lines represent the straight path the lines try to follow between boat cleats and dock cleats. Green lines represent the path the spring lines take when initially tied. As you tension the lines and they attempt to straighten and move to the straight line path, they act to push the hull away from the dock. If you just have the line from bow to dock cleat it still works pretty well.

Obviously you need bow and stern lines to limit how far the bow and stern can pivot away from the dock.

The dock needs to be lower than the desk so the spring line is against the hull for it to work.

I used 12mm nylon with a 37" boat and just tensioned by hand - set one line then used the other to tension both. If just using a bow spring, set it up taut against the bow line with stern line slack. As you tension the spring, it will push the whole boat out, with the stern being pushed further. Pull the stern back in and it tensions everything up further.

(Yeah I know I haven't put lines of force and created a free body diagram - I leave adding force lines normal to the curve in the spring lines as an exercise for the student)

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23 minutes ago, Se7en said:

image.png.b19ada68ab72a8fe2e8c1dc18b614ce8.png

Red lines represent the straight path the lines try to follow between boat cleats and dock cleats. Green lines represent the path the spring lines take when initially tied. As you tension the lines and they attempt to straighten and move to the straight line path, they act to push the hull away from the dock. If you just have the line from bow to dock cleat it still works pretty well.

Obviously you need bow and stern lines to limit how far the bow and stern can pivot away from the dock.

The dock needs to be lower than the desk so the spring line is against the hull for it to work.

I used 12mm nylon with a 37" boat and just tensioned by hand - set one line then used the other to tension both. If just using a bow spring, set it up taut against the bow line with stern line slack. As you tension the spring, it will push the whole boat out, with the stern being pushed further. Pull the stern back in and it tensions everything up further.

(Yeah I know I haven't put lines of force and created a free body diagram - I leave adding force lines normal to the curve in the spring lines as an exercise for the student)

The problem is if you put the lines of force on they cannot resolve as a force off the dock, try it....

In particular look at the force at the attachment points on the dock.

 

 

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1 hour ago, 2airishuman said:

Geez, Jack.  Have some more gin or something.

I prefer rum and weed, though not in the same same glass.

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39 minutes ago, JohnMB said:

The problem is if you put the lines of force on they cannot resolve as a force off the dock, try it....

In particular look at the force at the attachment points on the dock.

Exactly the full length stern/bow lines can't properly resolve all loads. If never large can give the impression they are. The centre pivot spring with end lines approach can.

Many boats can't even sucessfully set up full length bow/stern springs without taking out staunchens/standard rigging and or rubbing topsides. 

In fact the drawing is adopting the JFK "magic-single-bullet" theory to give the impression of clearance not being a issue.

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2 hours ago, 2airishuman said:

This.  Also, I am at a floating dock, so water levels are not a factor as the boat and the fingers move up and down together.

Using spring lines in my situation would be an affectation.

Unfortunately that is wrong thinking springs are the sole domain of fixed mooring structures, tidal or non tidal and don't apply to the floating variety. This is the most common misconception there is.

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41 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i've noticed none of the euro's have chimed in as docking stern in and no finger peers...   

Maybe because there is nothing to tie "springs" to. :lol:

Aft breast line(s) at best room permitting.

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i've noticed none of the euro's have chimed in as docking stern in and no finger peers...   

The OP (me) is originally from Europe. I haven't kept tabs and I refuse to read through all the posts again, but I recall there was at least one post by a Dutch guy with a story about stopping a boat in a lock. To the "euros" this is a no-brainer and I had no idea this topic would get 100+ posts. It has been entertaining though!

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16 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

When i leave my boat i always give it a "shoogle" test - good Scottish word that. Grab the pulpit and push back and forward - if she doesn't touch then all good.

I have my mooring lines set on the dock so I can simply hook them over the deck cleats and the boat is set. Slip them off the cleats and you're away. Saves a lot of time over tying & untying them fresh every time.

On "away" docks I do the shoogle test.

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5 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i've noticed none of the euro's have chimed in as docking stern in and no finger peers...   

I think that most of the residents euros here sail the Atlantic, the Channel, the Irish sea, the Baltic sea or the North sea and the docking stern in is a Mediterranean habit. TBH the few times I experienced it I managed not to be anywhere near the tiller when getting in. With modern boats, the reversing bit isn't too bad but I don't quite understand how they manage not to get the prop, the rudder or the keel tangled in one of all these ropes sitting in the water! Once you are in there, it is fairly easy, 2 stern lines and one (or 2 may be sometimes?) bow lines, tighten them all until the boat stops moving around. No tide so no need to leave some slack in the lines.

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18 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

I think that most of the residents euros here sail the Atlantic, the Channel, the Irish sea, the Baltic sea or the North sea and the docking stern in is a Mediterranean habit. TBH the few times I experienced it I managed not to be anywhere near the tiller when getting in. With modern boats, the reversing bit isn't too bad but I don't quite understand how they manage not to get the prop, the rudder or the keel tangled in one of all these ropes sitting in the water! Once you are in there, it is fairly easy, 2 stern lines and one (or 2 may be sometimes?) bow lines, tighten them all until the boat stops moving around. No tide so no need to leave some slack in the lines.

Yeah, that was my thinking, too. We don't see many posts from Med based sailors; mostly Atlantic coast and associated seas. The stern-on thing is known here as a "Med mooring": https://www.rya.org.uk/knowledge-advice/cruising-tips/boat-handling-sail/Pages/mediterranean-mooring.aspx

 ..and to the comment that this is a no brainer to the Europeans... I've certainly never noticed any lack of springs being rigged here but will try to check when I can get out & about again.  My expectation is that it would be pretty rare for anyone NOT to know how to tie up their boat, here. Even a newbie would only need to take a short walk around the marina/harbour to see what everyone else is doing and follow suit.

Cheers,

               W.

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Where I sail in the UK stern on mooring is quite common, both at the sailing club and at various Pubs which have moorings. There are only limited places where it is permitted on the river due to channel width.

Normal procedure, manouver so you're lined up, drop the mud weight off the bow while you're about 20ft out, reverse into place..(by quanting  if in a sailing boat)

Not so easy when you're single handed, no bow winch and the river has a tide running..

 

Tourist procedure, spend ages going in circles trying to line up, reverse in at high speed when you think you are lined up, hit boats both sides, before impacting on the bank.. bounce off, then hit it again slightly less impactful switch off, tie up(badly), then drop the mud weight off the bow if you remember..

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The variant I've seen (French med coast) is this one :

MjAxMDA4NzZlZGIwOTBhODg5MWM2NjkxNTNlOGZk

The "pendille"  as they call it is a line attached to a chain at the bottom and you retrieve it from the quay, may be sometimes it is attached to a buoy. Although this is not the academic and proper way of doing it and the local will look at you with disdain, I think that the easier way to deal with these quays is to just raft in reverse alongside the next boat, apologise for your inexperience while mumbling that you normally sail elsewhere, then sort out the lines calmly. That's much better than getting stressed that the boat is about to jam itself in diagonal between your two neighbours while you are figuring out which line is which and you end up needing to put your engine in gear while there are ropes floating around!

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9 hours ago, Panoramix said:

I think that most of the residents euros here sail the Atlantic, the Channel, the Irish sea, the Baltic sea or the North sea and the docking stern in is a Mediterranean habit.

I"ve only sailed the Baltic once, and then only some of the Deutsch bits. How folks moored depended on the docks.  Most of the marinas we were in had concrete docks & mooring posts (not sure that is the correct term).  Most folks moored stern-to at these facilities, as it was easier to get on/off the boat that way.

The Marina that had finger docks, most folks were bow-in, rather than stern-in.

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14 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

The OP (me) is originally from Europe. I haven't kept tabs and I refuse to read through all the posts again, but I recall there was at least one post by a Dutch guy with a story about stopping a boat in a lock. To the "euros" this is a no-brainer and I had no idea this topic would get 100+ posts. It has been entertaining though!

shows you how bored we all are....  :P

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7 hours ago, Panoramix said:

The variant I've seen (French med coast) is this one :

MjAxMDA4NzZlZGIwOTBhODg5MWM2NjkxNTNlOGZk

 

those crossed lines at the stern seems to negate the advantage of being stern in..

 

and the term moored...  to me means to be tied to a mooring ball via pennant and docking to be  in a slip or attached to the "quay" or posts...

 

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20 hours ago, JohnMB said:

The problem is if you put the lines of force on they cannot resolve as a force off the dock, try it....

In particular look at the force at the attachment points on the dock.

I love it when folks are arguing that something can't be done with people who have been doing it for years.

BTW, you are wrong to say that the lines of force do not have a component that acts off the dock. It is the same problem as a string between 2 points with a weight in the middle - the string exerts a force upwards on the weight. When the boat hull pushes against the line and bends it away from being straight, it is exerting a force on the line. And the line is exerting an equal and opposite force on the boat. Some guys named Isaac something came up with that one a while back. 

Jack - the spring lines rigged like this do rub against the hull - they have to. And if you read, I did specifically say that the lines have to be able to be run such that they are against the hull - ie the dock has to be lower than the cleats on the boat. As is the case with floating docks everywhere I've been.

The boat in the diagram is one I owned and cruised up and down the east coast of Aus. It lived on an end tie for a couple of years where there was only side ties available. In a 30 knot westerly the boat would be against the fenders. In a 5 knot westerly they would hang free.

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32 minutes ago, Se7en said:

I love it when folks are arguing that something can't be done with people who have been doing it for years.

BTW, you are wrong to say that the lines of force do not have a component that acts off the dock. It is the same problem as a string between 2 points with a weight in the middle - the string exerts a force upwards on the weight. When the boat hull pushes against the line and bends it away from being straight, it is exerting a force on the line. And the line is exerting an equal and opposite force on the boat. Some guys named Isaac something came up with that one a while back. 

 

Its not the same problem as a weight between two strings, because you are tring to push away the boat with the strings. The forces bending the line away from straight all get resolved on the boat.

if you cut your system anywhere on the lines off the boat you only have tensions in the lines, and the two lines drawn cannot provide a force off the dock. So you may have been doing for years but you have ignored where this force is coming from.

You are right newton says it very well. At the dock there are forces on the dock in the direction of the boat, and forces on the boat in the direction of the dock. Because you are using lines in tension there is no force on the boat in the direction of the dock. Apologies for not being clear enough I assumed you would understand that a force on the dock in the direction of the dock would not help keep the boat off the dock.

If you can draw a free body diagram that shows what you mean then maybe I will believe you, but for now you are defying Newtons first law.

 

 

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image.png.e0e0213a59380d8db45888844c26d87d.png

So here is the version with the free body cut through the spring lines, these lines cannot produce a resultant to the right. so they cannot move the boat off the dock. You need the fender to provide a reaction off the dock for this system to stay in equiilibrium.

NOTE because the cleats are on the boat, the effect of the tension on the hull is an internal force in this diagram, and is balance between the hull contact and the cleats.

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1 hour ago, JohnMB said:

You are right newton says it very well. At the dock there are forces on the dock in the direction of the boat, and forces on the boat in the direction of the dock. Because you are using lines in tension there is no force on the boat in the direction of the dock. Apologies for not being clear enough I assumed you would understand that a force on the dock in the direction of the dock would not help keep the boat off the dock.

If you can draw a free body diagram that shows what you mean then maybe I will believe you, but for now you are defying Newtons first law.

 

 

I understand what you are saying and you are right in that I just considered the force normal to a single line that is being curved around the hull. I need to think more on how lines in tension can possible generate a force away from the dock. Certainly counter intuitive to using spring lines to pivot a boat away from the dock where there is always contact to pivot off. I will find the time to look at a complete force diagram

Newton's first law is inertia isn't it? Aren't we dealing with the third law - equal and opposite here?

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Just now, Se7en said:

I understand what you are saying and you are right in that I just considered the force normal to a single line that is being curved around the hull. I need to think more on how lines in tension can possible generate a force away from the dock. Certainly counter intuitive to using spring lines to pivot a boat away from the dock where there is always contact to pivot off. I will find the time to look at a complete force diagram

Newton's first law is inertia isn't it? Aren't we dealing with the third law - equal and opposite here?

Newtons first law equilibrium, sum of forces for a body at constant velocity (including a stationary body) must equal zero. Fundamental basis of statics in engineering.

Richard Feynman has a great story about mixing paint https://blog.everydayscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/feynman-paint.pdf I don't care if someone has been doing something all their life, if it doesn't make physical sense to me I question it until it does make sense.

 

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El Boracho's Third Law of Yachting: You cannot push stuff away with ropes, use a stick.

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1 minute ago, JohnMB said:

Newtons first law equilibrium, sum of forces for a body at constant velocity (including a stationary body) must equal zero. Fundamental basis of statics in engineering.

Richard Feynman has a great story about mixing paint https://blog.everydayscientist.com/wp-content/uploads/feynman-paint.pdf I don't care if someone has been doing something all their life, if it doesn't make physical sense to me I question it until it does make sense.

 

I have not seen newtons first law stated that way - always in the form of "a body at rest will remain at rest, a body in motion will remain in motion until a force acts upon it". Incidentally, when newton decribed this he made a slight mistake when he talked about a ball rolling on a frictionless surface - a ball won't roll if there truely is no friction.

I am a Feynman (Fineman, never Feignman) fan, I have read his 12 lectures a few times and am typing this from a strip club in Tuva. And I don't buy the girls drinks.

As I said, I've observed my boat (37" about 8 tons loaded for cruising) move away from the dock as I tighten spring lines. I only thought as far as there being a force normal to the curve in the line trying to resist the bending in the line - which made sense. This thread is the first time I've thought about resolving all the forces, and I don't have an answer that satisfies me yet, so not surprised you are sceptical. I will apply whiskey and consider later today.

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32 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

El Boracho's Third Law of Yachting: You cannot push stuff away with ropes, use a stick.

Yup

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16 hours ago, The Q said:

Where I sail in the UK stern on mooring is quite common, both at the sailing club and at various Pubs which have moorings. 

 

13 hours ago, Panoramix said:

The variant I've seen (French med coast) is this one :

  MjAxMDA4NzZlZGIwOTBhODg5MWM2NjkxNTNlOGZk

How fuck does a "spring" thread go to a "med moor" thread and "docking" to "moored"?

...and Pano that bullshit theoretical drawing mate..really. What numbskull  puts crossed stern lines over the top of a "pasarell" thoroughfare as an obstruction and or trip hazard? A boat owning/chartering and unscrupulous dentist looking for more work?

Love the mooring buoy, pennant and seabed chain too....so the time when men were men and boys were of the cabin variety, a time when you used your own bow anchor to "med moor" is already lost it seems.

That dissapearing along with the legendary shit fights of fuckwits putting their underwater apendages/props through other people's anchor lines, stories that used to grow in stature every year, now forgotton. Have I told you the one about when in the Canaries blowing over 40, I pulled a gun or was it a knife to cut ....the Guardia arrested the other guy? 

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On 6/16/2020 at 11:24 PM, shanghaisailor said:

When i leave my boat i always give it a "shoogle" test - good Scottish word that.

Ahh yes the olde "shoogle" test.

Shang there is in fact a Top 13 of Olde English Words that should be used today that I can think easily attach to many tasks and experiences of sailing. I even call "docking" a Prime Ministerial experience using them. For instance.

Racings finished and feeling "ergophobia" like coming alongside with a "fudgel" assisting, their "grubling" the lines "zwodder" like as if they have the "woofits" ...when all you want to be is at the bar "grufeling" and talking "quomodocunquizing" with the "snollygosters" and where after too many pints "clinomania" kicks in, and you too awake with the "woofits."

1. Grubbling (v) "Like groping, except less organised

2. Snollygoster (n) "A shrewd, unprincipled person, especially a politician." 

3. Zwodder (n) "A drowsy and stupid state of body or mind."

4. Woofits (n/v) "A Hangover or hungover."

5. Grufeling (v) "To lie close wrapped up and in a comfortable-looking manner; used in ridicule." Example: Avoid grufeling in the face of a challenge.

6. Clinomania (n) "An obsessive desire to lie down."

7. Fudgel (v) "Pretending to work when you're not actually doing anything at all."

8. Ergophobia (n) "The morbid fear of returning to work."

9. Quomodocunquize (v) "To make money in any way that you can.” Example: Snollygosters are renoun for quomodocunquizing.

Shang this is where you now ask me why is "docking" a Prime Ministerial experience and why did I stop at 9 olde English words and not identify the full compliment of 13?

The answer is alass, only 9 of the 13 describe the current British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to a tee.

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15 hours ago, Panoramix said:

The variant I've seen (French med coast) is this one :

MjAxMDA4NzZlZGIwOTBhODg5MWM2NjkxNTNlOGZk

The "pendille"  as they call it is a line attached to a chain at the bottom and you retrieve it from the quay, may be sometimes it is attached to a buoy. Although this is not the academic and proper way of doing it and the local will look at you with disdain, I think that the easier way to deal with these quays is to just raft in reverse alongside the next boat, apologise for your inexperience while mumbling that you normally sail elsewhere, then sort out the lines calmly. That's much better than getting stressed that the boat is about to jam itself in diagonal between your two neighbours while you are figuring out which line is which and you end up needing to put your engine in gear while there are ropes floating around!

 

2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

 

How fuck does a "spring" thread go to a "med moor" thread and "docking" to "moored"?

...and Pano that bullshit theoretical drawing mate..really. What numbskull  puts crossed stern lines over the top of a "pasarell" thoroughfare as an obstruction and or trip hazard? A boat owning/chartering and unscrupulous dentist looking for more work?

Love the mooring buoy, pennant and seabed chain too....so the time when men were men and boys were of the cabin variety, a time when you used your own bow anchor to "med moor" is already lost it seems.

That dissapearing along with the legendary shit fights of fuckwits putting their underwater apendages/props through other people's anchor lines, stories that used to grow in stature every year, now forgotton. Have I told you the one about when in the Canaries blowing over 40, I pulled a gun or was it a knife to cut ....the Guardia arrested the other guy? 

 

The Greek marinas use the this setup. Was always fun to arrive solo at the marina with a cross breeze, and no boats in the next pen, even with the marina staff there to take your stern line and hand you the line for the bow (can't remember what it was called).

Almost no one ever used the crossed lines at the stern when they were on the boat. Very few added it when they flew home. 

Don't worry, at town quays you still get to drop the pick and reverse in. I enjoyed doing that solo as people would have the look of panic when they see me coming in, only to disappoint them by executing the docking smoothly.

Had one idiot on a charter boat drop his pick and aimed for the berth on my port, only to be blown to my other side and happily docked on my starboard side. Until I abused him and he went back out to reset.

 

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1 hour ago, The Dark Knight said:

The Greek marinas use the this setup. Was always fun to arrive solo at the marina.....

Don't worry, at town quays you still get  to drop the pick and reverse in. I enjoyed doing that solo as people would have the look of panic when they see me coming in, only to disappoint them by executing the docking smoothly.

So Hoppy you are a grown up "cabin boy" now from back then...as I described ? :DYou confuse the eras.

The time BEFORE God invented for smaller medium sized boats powered windlesses, winches and chain counters, remote controls, thrusters, sail drives (with fuck all prop walk) and even deck cams ...let alone the computerised docking systems.... the words "dock staff" meant the fee collector or a gatekeeper....a time when sub 50/60 footers were allowed and had to tie up next to super yachts, (though smaller than today's) giving a cigarette paper clearances either side and where the pain of getting it wrong was very expensive to one's career, wallet and ego. And Murphy always seemed to have first time locations happen at night which also meant downside no-one around to take a line but upside is if you fucked up no-one saw you.

The "solo" med-moor today is a walk in the park. :lol:

3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

...the time when men were men and boys were of the cabin variety, a time when you used your own bow anchor to "med moor" is already lost it seems.

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Guilty of powered windlass with a remote. 
 

Love propwalk, would hate to not have it. Bow thrusters are for pussies or charter boats. 

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9 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

 

How fuck does a "spring" thread go to a "med moor" thread and "docking" to "moored"?

...and Pano that bullshit theoretical drawing mate..really. What numbskull  puts crossed stern lines over the top of a "pasarell" thoroughfare as an obstruction and or trip hazard? A boat owning/chartering and unscrupulous dentist looking for more work?

Love the mooring buoy, pennant and seabed chain too....so the time when men were men and boys were of the cabin variety, a time when you used your own bow anchor to "med moor" is already lost it seems.

That dissapearing along with the legendary shit fights of fuckwits putting their underwater apendages/props through other people's anchor lines, stories that used to grow in stature every year, now forgotton. Have I told you the one about when in the Canaries blowing over 40, I pulled a gun or was it a knife to cut ....the Guardia arrested the other guy? 

Juist a picture that I nicked from Voiles et Voiliers. Mediterranean waters are too warm for me so I don't really have a qualified opinion on the matter!

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17 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

....and the term moored...  to me means to be tied to a mooring ball via pennant and docking to be  in a slip or attached to the "quay" or posts...

Context is all: On British inland waterways mooring is a very different thing:

https://www.waterways.org.uk/blog/how_moor_boat

 ..but the term is universal. In fact if you go googling for moorings (in the UK) you'll find more of these come up in searches than coastal buoys-on-chains...

Cheers,

               W.

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11 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

Context is all: On British inland waterways mooring is a very different thing:

https://www.waterways.org.uk/blog/how_moor_boat

 ..but the term is universal. In fact if you go googling for moorings (in the UK) you'll find more of these come up in searches than coastal buoys-on-chains...

Cheers,

               W.

Mate I'm sorry but the term is not universal.

You are obviously confused by the extremely high level of discussion attached to this thread.

The word "moor" or make fast (a boat) by attaching it by cable or rope to the shore OR to an anchor is a verb. For example "We have to moor up for the night." That could be at a dock OR at anchor.

The word "mooring" is a "place" where a boat or ship is moored is a noun. It is a "place" that has no other use, it is NOT like a jetty or a dock performing other functions.

The word "moorings" is plural and more than one mooring. However it can also apply to the ropes, chains, or anchors by or to which a boat, ship, or buoy is moored. But not the mooring itself. For example "Jack Sparrows marvelous great ship slipped her moorings and slid out into the Atlantic" 

The term "moorings" can't apply to a fixed mooring as you cannot "slip off" something that is fixed like a dock or jetty.

That brings me finally to the word "moored" which is a tricky fucker. Still a verb but can be used in the "present" and "past" tense. "All the fleet was moored up in the harbour."  They could all be at docks, moorings or a collection of both.

So I'm sorry to say you are wrong.

So you come alongside a dock, pier or wharf you will use fenders, dock lines, and other equipment to protect and secure your boat while docked. On the other hand a permanent anchor spot is called boat moorings, with its mooring float, a rode and a permanent mooring anchor at the bottom. An anchor used to moor not on a permanent basis is still a mooring.

Mooring University :lol:

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The boat is THE free body. 
The earth is A free body 

Spring lines don’t really move the earth in spite of Jack’s learned parable 

Draw the boat vectors and trust the earth to stay her course 

Watch the boat float away from the dock AIBFM

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30 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

The boat is THE free body. 
The earth is A free body 

Absolutely and likewise the dock and vessel in space are free bodies. 

Like how many times did you hear Capt Kirk say; "Scotty bring her in easy with our mooring station approach slow at -376gigaththusts and 475 millidegress as I want to moor the Enterprise without risk of overshooting the mooring station airlock and having to deploy our longitudinal mooring connectors as that will curtail any quick mooring station exit in case all is not what it appears at this station"

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6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Mate I'm sorry but the term is not universal.

You are obviously confused by the extremely high level of discussion attached to this thread.

The word "moor" or make fast (a boat) by attaching it by cable or rope to the shore OR to an anchor is a verb. For example "We have to moor up for the night." That could be at a dock OR at anchor.

The word "mooring" is a "place" where a boat or ship is moored is a noun. It is a "place" that has no other use, it is NOT like a jetty or a dock performing other functions.

The word "moorings" is plural and more than one mooring. However it can also apply to the ropes, chains, or anchors by or to which a boat, ship, or buoy is moored. But not the mooring itself. For example "Jack Sparrows marvelous great ship slipped her moorings and slid out into the Atlantic" 

The term "moorings" can't apply to a fixed mooring as you cannot "slip off" something that is fixed like a dock or jetty.

That brings me finally to the word "moored" which is a tricky fucker. Still a verb but can be used in the "present" and "past" tense. "All the fleet was moored up in the harbour."  They could all be at docks, moorings or a collection of both.

So I'm sorry to say you are wrong.

So you come alongside a dock, pier or wharf you will use fenders, dock lines, and other equipment to protect and secure your boat while docked. On the other hand a permanent anchor spot is called boat moorings, with its mooring float, a rode and a permanent mooring anchor at the bottom. An anchor used to moor not on a permanent basis is still a mooring.

Mooring University :lol:

Apologies, Jack. Misunderstanding. 

 I meant that the term is universally used on the waterways... all "narrowboaters" use it to mean a place on the bank or a pontoon in a marina (that's another wierd adoption... how can you have a marina in the middle of a field?), or the process of securing the boat to same;  by universal, I was trying to make it clear that it's not just a few folk that use the term.

 You can argue that they use it incorrectly but if the whole community has changed the meaning of the word then it's just dialect or slang or jargon or something (IANALinguist), hence reference to context... the word has a different meaning in that one. 

 Always seems odd to me.

Cheers,

               W.

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3 minutes ago, WGWarburton said:

I meant that the term is universally used on the waterways... all "narrowboaters"

Mate ...."narrow boaters" ....fuck me. The ones that turn their topsides into looking like a Chelsea Flower Show exhibition, have aluminium casement windows, obviously read books on recycling cedar shingles and have not one but sometimes two fucking chimneys.

These are the people now determining the maritime vernacular??? Piss off. :lol:

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