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Vendée – Arctique – Les Sables d’Olonne race.

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17 minutes ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

I'm starting to think that Charal's Achillies heel is drift conditions, she fell off the pace crossing the doldrums in the TJV and here she is again falling away from Apivia again as per the TJV.

In the TJV it's was also a major case of bad luck, the others found a door through the doldrums, whereas Charal got stuck in a hole.

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Can't blame bad luck this time, they were practically side by side.

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1 hour ago, yl75 said:

In the TJV it's was also a major case of bad luck, the others found a door through the doldrums, whereas Charal got stuck in a hole.

She's up and going again tacked North and doing ok

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I think that for Charal there's a lot to lose on this race and few to win.

Anything else than a win would be a bummer

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I am gonna stick my neck out and say Charal to win. In this race, it’s the best boat with the best skipper. However, had HB taken part .....

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great drag race to the mark now, showing the relative speed of the two leaders. Love to see Samantha doing well again, can't wait for her reports from the Vendee.

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They’re not even in any kind of downwind leg yet and we’re declaring winners?

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2 hours ago, popo said:

I think that for Charal there's a lot to lose on this race and few to win.

Anything else than a win would be a bummer

You mean in terms of VG psychological warfare ?

Not sure it will change much really, we see the boats are very close in upwind conditions, indeed if Charal is bad in some windy downwind (that we should see one time or another in this race), it could be problematic, but had he not participated, I think it would be worse

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3 minutes ago, yl75 said:

You mean in terms of VG psychological warfare ?

Not sure it will change much really, we see the boats are very close in upwind conditions, indeed if Charal is bad in some windy downwind (that we should see one time or another in this race), it could be problematic, but had he not participated, I think it would be worse

And Beyou is such a mature sailor - I’m not sure it matters. In the last 3 editions, it isn’t the fastest upwind boat that wins. It isn’t the fastest downwind boat that wins. 

There is a reason why the VG is the VG. You need a skipper who can route good enough, technically strong enough to develop a reliable and safe platform, maintain it around the southern ocean, cope with constant work list, secure funding, and have luck. 

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1 hour ago, Miffy said:

They’re not even in any kind of downwind leg yet and we’re declaring winners?

well ..., they are foilers that are supposed to "suffer" in these conditions. so where should the counter come? on the downwind leg?

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7 minutes ago, minca3 said:

well ..., they are foilers that are supposed to "suffer" in these conditions. so where should the counter come? on the downwind leg?

After the last VG, no one seriously thinks a non-foiling boat is going to win. 

The ongoing question is what are the sweet angles and performance differentiation in light-medium & heavy air for the 2nd gen foilers. No one knows at the moment. Not even the teams. 

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I'm not saying that there's lessons to be learn with this course.

Just that if without breakage or tactical choice he isn't first, it would mean that all the advantage he had to be the most proven boat would have allready vanished

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2 hours ago, ttc546 said:

I am gonna stick my neck out and say Charal to win. In this race, it’s the best boat with the best skipper. However, had HB taken part .....

....Alex would probably hit something". Finished it for you.  You're welcome. ;-)

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Wow, they have reduced the race a lot, the "Gallimard" waypoint is now North West of La Corogne.

 

Quote

This Wednesday, Race Management reported that it is repositioning the Gallimard mark, the southern waypoint in the Vendée – Arctique – Les Sables d’Olonne.

The Gallimard mark has therefore been repositioned at 46°20N – 015°W, very slightly below the latitude of Les Sables d’Olonne and some 400 miles off the Atlantic coast. By relocating this waypoint, Race Management is effectively enabling the last boats in the fleet to avoid becoming ensnared in an extensive high pressure zone settling over the Azores, where it was initially positioned.

The total theoretical course for the Vendée – Arctique – Les Sables d’Olonne is therefore being shortened from 3,566 nautical miles to 2,807 miles, for approximately the same overall duration.

Jacques Caraës, Race Director of the Vendée – Arctique – Les Sables d’Olonne:“By repositioning the Gallimard mark, Race Management and the weather cell are simply trying to refine the ETAs (estimated time of arrival). A high pressure system is settling in over the Azores, which the back runners might well have become ensnared in if the initial positioning had been retained. Positioning the mark at 46°20N – 015°W enables us to pretty much stick to the initial format of around 12 days. It is likely there will be a bunching up of the fleet with around thirty hours separating the first and last boats. The skippers in the Class IMOCA have really had their work cut out in the first part of the race. When you sail a course from north to south, you know that you’re going to pass through various weather systems rather than accompanying them: low pressure systems, ridges of high pressure, sustained or light winds, all of which enable you to play around with strategies and work on points of sail. This is evidenced by the fact that the IMOCAs with classic (straight) daggerboards are still in the match and it’s very difficult to predict who will make the podium!”

 

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On 7/7/2020 at 7:41 AM, yl75 said:

And that the guy who has "checked"(not sure what it means here) his foils is the same that also did it for Alex.

There’s more to the Hugo Boss foil take than is public. Don’t slate the NDT guys. 

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19 hours ago, terrafirma said:

No noise is a catch 22 scenario. The noises are your communication with the boat itself. Without them you may not know something is wrong? The foiling noises may or may not be an issue with each individual. Earphones could be an option as you can still have access to ambient sounds or cancel them out all together? I suspect  most sailors grow accustomed. The girls doing well Samantha in 4th place. Looking at the wind overlay and forecasts it looks like a North East heading is their only option until the reach the Easterly winds that will get them around the mark in a more favorable manner.

Pretty sure we’ve seen photos of a few wearing headphones and talking about this. 

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So what can we draw from this race so far to make comparisons to the upcoming VG?

1/ Unfortunately the weather has been mostly light to moderate and on the nose, so nothing like the VG. So any conclusions are difficult at best.

2/ We can't  compare Hugo Boss and Corum with the fleet  because they did not compete.

3/ Apicil, L'Occitane and Arkea Paprec have retired, AP with serious problems with their foils, which they may not be able to fix in time for the VG.

4/ Standout boats so far have been Apivia and Charal, with LinkedOut doing well, along with Initatives Coeur and PRB.

So come November my picks would be, Apivia, Charal, Hugo Boss and LinkedOut to be the front runners, the winner? Who knows?

 

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34 minutes ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

So what can we draw from this race so far to make comparisons to the upcoming VG?

1/ Unfortunately the weather has been mostly light to moderate and on the nose, so nothing like the VG. So any conclusions are difficult at best.

2/ We can't  compare Hugo Boss and Corum with the fleet  because they did not compete.

3/ Apicil, L'Occitane and Arkea Paprec have retired, AP with serious problems with their foils, which they may not be able to fix in time for the VG.

4/ Standout boats so far have been Apivia and Charal, with LinkedOut doing well, along with Initatives Coeur and PRB.

So come November my picks would be, Apivia, Charal, Hugo Boss and LinkedOut to be the front runners, the winner? Who knows?

 

Why is Hugo Boss in your list of picks when we haven't seen her race? 

 

Why don't AP think they can fix the foil issues before VG?

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Dalin on Apivia, this is his first solo Imoca race. Great performance. And the other rooky Cremer, great performance too.
Is this the first solo race for Escoffier too ?

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Well Apivia has a 7 mile lead over Charal and Linkedout a further 31 miles back. Samantha in 4th has done very well. The leading pack should make good speed to the top mark and with some luck could have a decent run back? This is where we find out about speed and who has the most with the top 3 as they are the newest boats. Linkedout the fastest boat over the last 4 hours and we know Thomas will work hard to get back in the lead. Interesting times ahead.

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14 minutes ago, Icedtea said:

Why is Hugo Boss in your list of picks when we haven't seen her race? 

 

Why don't AP think they can fix the foil issues before VG?

Beat me to it Iced Tea!
Based on this race how can anyone pic HB (didn't even turn up), in place of two other "standout boats" who are actually out there performing?
And so far this race has had its fair share of tough conditions. From what competitors actually report 35 kts and 3m waves, not exactly "light and moderate" in my book when doing 12 plus knots hard upwind!

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1 minute ago, staysail said:

Beat me to it Iced Tea!
Based on this race how can anyone pic HB (didn't even turn up), in place of two other "standout boats" who are actually out there performing?
And so far this race has had its fair share of tough conditions. From what competitors actually report 35 kts and 3m waves, not exactly "light and moderate" in my book when doing 12 plus knots hard upwind!

Yeah I'm with you. I think Alex will be facing a mountain of trepidation as regardless of who is at fault he is always on breaking boats. Alex will need his boat to be faster and even if it is he will go off on a flyer and this is why he has a real battle just to get on the podium this time. I'd like to see him win and perhaps I'm too hard on him so wish him his share of luck this time around come November.

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26 minutes ago, Icedtea said:

Why don't AP think they can fix the foil issues before VG?

There’s substantial lead time in layering the composite work, vacuum bagging and cooking and repeat. Even running nonstop shifts, it takes months. 

AP also needs to understand their underlying problem - and they can’t fix it until they do. It could be the hull is too light and flexy. It could be that the bearing system is flawed. 

Either requires significant time in the boatyard. Oh also the skipper is an imoca rookie and has yet to qualify because AP needed significant rebuild to comply with imoca rules so the past events didn’t count. 

Just making it to the start line will be a massive project management challenge. 

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5 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

Yeah I'm with you. I think Alex will be facing a mountain of trepidation as regardless of who is at fault he is always on breaking boats. Alex will need his boat to be faster and even if it is he will go off on a flyer and this is why he has a real battle just to get on the podium this time. I'd like to see him win and perhaps I'm too hard on him so wish him his share of luck this time around come November.

As a Frenchman, I would rather see a French sailor winning the VG... again !

That being said, if Alex wins on HB, that means he deserved it. And yes, I think he is of the caliber to win this race. He still has a maverick approach to navigation some times, but it makes following the race more interesting!

More importantly, I think it would be really good for the Vendée Globe race itself for a non-French to win it.

 

Even better: Sam Davies ! A Brit, a female (great) sailor, and a francophile ! What's not to like !

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I still think HB is in with a shot at a podium in the VG if AT can get the monkey off his back, re breakage. I hope he can be the first non French winner of the VG. Doing the Arctic race would not have helped his cause, so I guess they thought it would be more productive to stay away.

 

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13 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

Yeah I'm with you. I think Alex will be facing a mountain of trepidation as regardless of who is at fault he is always on breaking boats. Alex will need his boat to be faster and even if it is he will go off on a flyer and this is why he has a real battle just to get on the podium this time. I'd like to see him win and perhaps I'm too hard on him so wish him his share of luck this time around come November.

I admire Alex for his grit and determination but in preparing for the VG I think both the skipper and the boat need maximum possible experience sailing single handed for long periods and if possible against other boats. Unless the boat isn't race ready it would seem a bit shortsighted to pass up on this race which is an ideal opportunity to shake things down and gain experience. If it just wasn't possible for him to get to this start line then I understand, otherwise ...

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3 minutes ago, staysail said:

I admire Alex for his grit and determination but in preparing for the VG I think both the skipper and the boat need maximum possible experience sailing single handed for long periods and if possible against other boats. Unless the boat isn't race ready it would seem a bit shortsighted to pass up on this race which is an ideal opportunity to shake things down and gain experience. If it just wasn't possible for him to get to this start line then I understand, otherwise ...

Counterpoint: if the program preparation is about finding modes and peak performance and modifying/adjusting software - staying home with full crew is a better use of his time. 

Send your crew out every day for 12 hours. Drive the boat hard it all conditions and modes - gather data. Analyze data. Repeat. 
 

As an old imoca guy - I don’t think he’s learning the same living aboard/race lifestyle management lessons that someone like Cremer is having. 

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Pretty open course on the way home with the potential pressure in the East, a ridge on the lay line and 90 degree veer. Should be good fun. 

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All I can see for the return is light winds at the turn and headwinds all the way home.

 

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40 minutes ago, staysail said:

I admire Alex for his grit and determination but in preparing for the VG I think both the skipper and the boat need maximum possible experience sailing single handed for long periods and if possible against other boats. Unless the boat isn't race ready it would seem a bit shortsighted to pass up on this race which is an ideal opportunity to shake things down and gain experience. If it just wasn't possible for him to get to this start line then I understand, otherwise ...

I'm not sure that he is not sailing. As another poster mentioned it's upwind so far for the most part quite light not really VG conditions. I could see why he might skip it to get some more time sailing fast downwind.

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42 minutes ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

I still think HB is in with a shot at a podium in the VG if AT can get the monkey off his back, re breakage. I hope he can be the first non French winner of the VG. Doing the Arctic race would not have helped his cause, so I guess they thought it would be more productive to stay away.

 

He certainly has a quick boat, RS. Keeping HB in one piece will take all his considerable skill and a lot of luck.

Interestingly, he'll have a lot more competition this go around, too. 

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As others have said, Sam's race is pretty impressive thus far.  Go girl.

Screen Shot 2020-07-09 at 2.17.57 PM.png

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Untitled.thumb.jpg.043983c7ce8242383f86c25642a146e3.jpg

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Of the three new VPLP designs, Charal has a huge advantage.  They launched early and tested the shit out of the boat, refined the foils, bow and who know what else and are further testing on the race course.  However, Verdier must be feeling really good about his design approach since it doesn't seem they've changed much at all since launching and then Charal essentially adopted his foil concept.   Also, both Verdier designs were capable of holding off the modified Gen 2. VPLP out of the box, so that's fantastic.  My favorite is the Manuard design.  Very fast off the wind, early in the race, with very few miles.  I like Manuard's approach the most.  Scow bow, water shedding deck, low flying and simple looking.  I hope Armel's team gets her sorted, because I think his boat is going to be the easiest to drive hard in the South.  

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14 minutes ago, r.finn said:

Of the three new VPLP designs, Charal has a huge advantage.  They launched early and tested the shit out of the boat, refined the foils, bow and who know what else and are further testing on the race course.  However, Verdier must be feeling really good about his design approach since it doesn't seem they've changed much at all since launching and then Charal essentially adopted his foil concept.   Also, both Verdier designs were capable of holding off the modified Gen 2. VPLP out of the box, so that's fantastic.  My favorite is the Manuard design.  Very fast off the wind, early in the race, with very few miles.  I like Manuard's approach the most.  Scow bow, water shedding deck, low flying and simple looking.  I hope Armel's team gets her sorted, because I think his boat is going to be the easiest to drive hard in the South.  

Yes it's exactly what the sport and these races need. Varying designer input and concepts. As we speak Charal and Apivia having a battle royale and Linkedout having the luxury to come up from behind and capitalize on shifts etc. So we have Hugo Boss using a stay at home and optimize approach and these guys making it time on the water in real world racing. So far reliability has been good except for Arkea and L'Occitane (2 different designers).  Speed is one thing but reliability is everything. An older design could win the VG if all the newer boats break etc however VPLP etc have an established database to design their boats to be reliable and that's an advantage. The Hugo Boss approach is more of a collaboration which can work as well. Exciting times too because some of the older designs have been given a new lease of life and whilst maybe not quite as fast they are way faster than before which is good for the race and the potential price point to enter. Wouldn't want to pick this race yet lot's of minefields ahead.

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4 hours ago, staysail said:

I admire Alex for his grit and determination but in preparing for the VG I think both the skipper and the boat need maximum possible experience sailing single handed for long periods and if possible against other boats. Unless the boat isn't race ready it would seem a bit shortsighted to pass up on this race which is an ideal opportunity to shake things down and gain experience. If it just wasn't possible for him to get to this start line then I understand, otherwise ...

Odd comment.  Alex has more time sailing solo than anyone else in the VG and he has finished on the podium twice.  Only Beyou also has a podium finish (3rd).  Add that Alex finished 3rd on a boat that was at least two generations older than the other front runners and he clearly had the fastest boat last time.  Seems like of all the entrees Alex needs time in actual races the least.  The only things he needs to give him a chance of winning are a boat that he can sail to its potential and a boat that doesn't break.  

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3 hours ago, Roleur said:

The only things he needs to give him a chance of winning are a boat that he can sail to its potential and a boat that doesn't break.  

Not so sure about that. Maybe true if his boat is an order of magnitude faster than all the others, but is it? How can he know unless he takes opportunities to sail with/against them? An ability to perform better than the others in an actual race is also a factor which helps even if he has a super fast super reliable boat. As with any skill, most folk need practice, and in the business of racing that means sailing against others.

Alex seriously wants to win, not simply to have a chance at it!

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Not picking HB is a bit like like not picking Usain Bolt for the Olympics at his prime because he didn't take part in the last League of diamond meeting.
He showed during RdR that the boat is fast and the sailor as well, he also showed during RdR and TJV that he still has this make or break attitude. He didn't win the last one but he made it a race. Didn't give up after the breakage and kept pushing, there isn't much to criticize on that one except that he suffered back luck quite early (day 13) and it was close 60 days later... And almost all have Dalin in their picks (his also in mine) while he has never done such a long race and we know that the Vendee is also mental and about holding the distance.

@Laurent your comment about Davies reminded me about Ellen McArthur, she definitely had my support at the time and that second place was something behind Mr Vendee if we can call him so (who would anyone pick as Mr Vendee?). Davies is proving to be a nicely sailor and person as well, once again in a nice position.

 

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11 minutes ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

Do we know what sort of training Alex is doing?

 

I don't know any more than what is on his website (pasted below). I don't see much logic behind the decision not to do this race if he was ready and willing to do the New York one. Alex not known to be one to avoid risk taking!

 

“Ahead of the Vendée we were scheduled to race in the New York to Vendée Transat, but the race was cancelled due to COVID-19. IMOCA have since organised a replacement race – the Vendée-Arctic-Les Sables d’Olonne – which is due to begin on July 4th but we have made the decision not to participate.

“That decision was based on a number of factors. We felt that the race did not align well with our schedule and there are also, of course, still restrictions on travel and quarantine requirements, which would make competing in the race more complex. I also have some concerns over the risks associated with competing in a race which takes boats further north than Cape Horn is south. For us, it was an unnecessary risk to take so close to the Vende Globe.

“Ultimately, quality time on the water is of paramount importance now and we’ve put together a schedule that we believe allows us to use the time we have left in the very best way.”

Over the coming weeks and months, Thomson and his crew will train offshore in a bid to further develop and enhance the performance of the HUGO BOSS boat, which launched in the summer of last year after more than two years in design and build. Thomson will also complete his solo 2,000 nautical mile passage, a final qualification requirement for the Vendée Globe.

“We feel in really good shape” he continued. “Of course, like all the teams, we’ve lost time on the water but that was out of our hands. The team has adapted well and we’ve really made the most of this period. Now it’s about putting the knowledge we’ve gained – and projects we’ve worked hard to develop – to the test. We’re now a few days into our training and I’m very pleased with the decisions that we’ve made so far. HUGO BOSS is performing very well indeed!”

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Anyone know why the organisers have put the turning marks so far away from land? At 120 miles from Iceland and now 320 miles from Coruna there is not much prospect of anyone going out in boats or planes to get some video, Surely a bit more exposure to the public would go down well with all the sponsors and if they had moved the Azores mark to within a few miles of Coruna I doubt there would be much risk of a long term park-up.

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13 minutes ago, staysail said:

I don't know any more than what is on his website (pasted below). I don't see much logic behind the decision not to do this race if he was ready and willing to do the New York one. Alex not known to be one to avoid risk taking!

Theres a difference between sticking to your previous commitments versus making new ones when you've just got the boat back out the shed however I wonder if its more because having a giant Hugo Boss banner come into NY harbour has great sponsor ROI, plus getting to show the boat off etc

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21 minutes ago, staysail said:

Anyone know why the organisers have put the turning marks so far away from land? At 120 miles from Iceland and now 320 miles from Coruna there is not much prospect of anyone going out in boats or planes to get some video, Surely a bit more exposure to the public would go down well with all the sponsors and if they had moved the Azores mark to within a few miles of Coruna I doubt there would be much risk of a long term park-up.

Yes there was quite a bit of thought put into the course, here is their explanation. (Ice, weather, coastal dangers and routing etc.)

The course
What’s the programme ? The theoretical course of 3,556 miles (6,585 km) starts off Les Sables d'Olonne at 1530hrs local time (1330hrsTU). The fleet head northwards  for the COI-Unesco1 buoy, located between the south of Iceland and the southern tip of Greenland, in the Irminger Sea. Then, they will charge south to the mark offshore of the Azores where they will have to pass the Institut Pasteur buoy. Then they climb north-eastwards to the finish line off Les Sables-d'Olonne. In essences this big triangle in the North Atlantic should take about ten days.

To limit the dangers racing close to the different coasts is prohibited thanks to the careful use of coastal marks and traffic separation schemes traffic schemes which the solo sailors will leave to starboard on the way out and to port on their return. Ice is clearly visible and tracked in the  the western Arctic region and so Race Direction has delineated a ‘no-go’ ice zone which prohibits the Labrador Sea and the Denmark Strait.

Jacques Caraës, race director: “We know, by choosing course n ° 1, that the fastest boats will get  more wind but they will also have the possibility of setting their routing so they don’t get into the strongest winds. The slower will be spared the harshest conditions. But anyway, I think the conditions are likely to be quite manageable for boats and sailors who are preparing for the Vendée Globe. If we had just gone to the Azores we would not have had the challenges of the north, a unknown area to solo skippers. "

In terms of weather conditions, vigilance is required. At the start the fleet will see 12 to 17 knots of west-southwest wind at the start. But from Sunday, it will get tougher for the race leader with gusts over 25knots and heavy seas (up to 4 meters in the south-west of Ireland). A new depression is then expected in the north and an anticyclone will form in the Azores, care must be taken not to be trapped by the high pressure ridge. Jacques Caraës, race director, nevertheless wants to be reassuring: "The conditions are largely manageable for a course which is designed as preparation for the Vendée Globe".

Not a normal start
After weeks working on weather prep and the reliability of their monohulls, and of course the stress and worry of having had two key transatlantic races cancelled, and indeed concerns that racing might not happen at all this season, these are the moments that skippers have dreamed of during their eight weeks of confinement.Skippers and teams were all tested at the start of the week and locked down with their team bubbles. The IMOCAs left their home dock with no more than four sailors on board and many sat on anchor off Les Sables d’Olonne or in the nearby islands last night.

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All 3 boats Linkedout, Apivia and Charal will be going around the mark together. Thomas has snuck up on the inside. Will be a slow rounding and a matter of keeping the boats moving in the light. 

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26 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

Yes there was quite a bit of thought put into the course, here is their explanation. (Ice, weather, coastal dangers and routing etc.)

The course
What’s the programme ? The theoretical course of 3,556 miles (6,585 km) starts off Les Sables d'Olonne at 1530hrs local time (1330hrsTU). The fleet head northwards  for the COI-Unesco1 buoy, located between the south of Iceland and the southern tip of Greenland, in the Irminger Sea. Then, they will charge south to the mark offshore of the Azores where they will have to pass the Institut Pasteur buoy. Then they climb north-eastwards to the finish line off Les Sables-d'Olonne. In essences this big triangle in the North Atlantic should take about ten days.

To limit the dangers racing close to the different coasts is prohibited ......

Thanks Terrafirma, reads like 100% organized for prioritizing value to skippers and teams for VG preparation (which is fair enough) but 0% consideration for sponsor ROI, and incidentally 0% for encouraging public following, which i see as a bit disappointing.  And it looks as if (see John Rowe comment) the HB organization have their eyes focused on ROI and don't value the VG preparation aspect in the same way as the organizers, hence HB ducked out.

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LinkedOut looks pretty damn handy in light air. Nice job getting back to the leaders for the mark rounding.

Screen Shot 2020-07-09 at 9.26.54 PM.png

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If the wind conditions stay as they have been over the last few days Thomas should just hang in there with Charlie and Jeremie, and not take any fliers, as it appears that LinkedOut is the  killer boat in the current conditions.

 

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Did LinkedOut just miss the waypoint? Or is the tracker not accurate enough...?

 

 

va2020.jpg

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The tracker shows Linkedout in the lead however the boat track shows the boat as not rounding the mark? The boat track shows the boat sailing below the mark. Conversely Apivia  above the mark? Not sure if this is a tracker malfunction? If not it's a major by Thomas but I simply can't see this happening

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Just now, minca3 said:

Did LinkedOut just miss the waypoint? Or is the tracker not accurate enough...?

 

 

va2020.jpg

Yes I had just finished writing the same question. Tracker shows LO missed the mark? (Clearly). Hopefully it's a tracker issue but when you look at Apivia's track it's hard to marry them up

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Tracker Issue..! Apivia shows as missing the mark as well. Thank god for Thomas

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Tracker will be plotting straight lines from position to next position, not following in real time.

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Just now, staysail said:

Tracker will be plotting straight lines from position to next position, not following in real time.

That makes sense and that's exactly what it looks like. Cheers..

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12 minutes ago, staysail said:

Tracker will be plotting straight lines from position to next position, not following in real time.

Yeah you can see the lines between positions.

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This is fun, nice job Thomas sneaking in between.
It is not a boring drag race et all.

But I do miss mister Clack Clack.

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2 minutes ago, LeoV said:

This is fun, nice job Thomas sneaking in between.
It is not a boring drag race et all.

But I do miss mister Clack Clack.

So Leo, what happened to Jean Le Cam, to exclude him for this race?

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I see the tracker has now been "adjusted" to show everyone rounding the mark!

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2 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

So Leo, what happened to Jean Le Cam, to exclude him for this race?

I think he is still in the shed with his boat....

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Rounding this mark must be quite demanding. Judging the approach, shifting ballast, re-stacking, managing the tack itself with the big sails.

And looking at the frequently updating tracker it seems the wind is flukey.  Busy sailors out there right now!

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What a move from Thomas !

Couldn't follow at all this morning, but using the replay feature on the tracker is really quite impressive.

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In re AT not doing this. Michel Desjoyeaux said everyone wanted more time, and in the end, the result is the judge of the process. According to French news AT is currently at sea - so who knows, maybe he’s searching for heavy air downwind and could be done with his qualifications before the participants get home. 

i don’t really don’t understand the continued point re Hugo Boss not being there being a performance problem - this is imoca, not OD Olympic sailing. You sail your own boat - yes there’s some element of minimizing relative risk and reducing chance of massive mile losses, but AT has always gone his own way in weather routing and his boat’s planning polars are probably quite a bit diff. 

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image.thumb.png.6ca33cb83880e376417bf9b10d72c668.png

Interesting to see APIVIA sailing both foils up in the light, (video here at 1:55). I guess that's why they all tried to have foils that can retract out of the water and limit the loss with very light wind. Should also help to maintain the boat direction.

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Thomas and Charlie taking selfies of themselves with each other in the background?

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During the start, the commentators said an interesting thing.

With a 7 degree of keel tilt for the new boats, when sailing really fast, they play more with the keel angle than the foils to control the ride hight, so in steong winds it happens that they "unkeel" a bit

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2 hours ago, Lakrass said:

image.thumb.png.6ca33cb83880e376417bf9b10d72c668.png

Interesting to see APIVIA sailing both foils up in the light, (video here at 1:55). I guess that's why they all tried to have foils that can retract out of the water and limit the loss with very light wind. Should also help to maintain the boat direction.

What's that ahead.? Surely not Ice..?

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1 hour ago, popo said:

During the start, the commentators said an interesting thing.

With a 7 degree of keel tilt for the new boats, when sailing really fast, they play more with the keel angle than the foils to control the ride hight, so in steong winds it happens that they "unkeel" a bit

Foils are manually powered, but the keel is hydraulic. Much easier to trim the keel...

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Yellowbrick must have some bugs.  Some boats are showing the last reported location at 17:30 and some at 18:00.  there also seems to me a 20 min delay until they are posted.

 

 

 

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33 minutes ago, JonRowe said:

Foils are manually powered, but the keel is hydraulic. Much easier to trim the keel...

Yeah sure but doesn't that means that the static RM of a quanted keel, at some speed, is less than the dynamic lift of the keel fin ?

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3 minutes ago, popo said:

Yeah sure but doesn't that means that the static RM of a quanted keel, at some speed, is less than the dynamic lift of the keel fin ?

I'm just hazarding a guess that the ease of being able to trim the keel on a button (with precise controllable increments) beats any benefits from changing the foil setup in terms of fine tuning.

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2 older boats in the top 5 and only 3.6 miles from first to 5th. Don't think anyone would have predicted that!

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Amazing compression of the fleet: top 6 within 6 miles!
There's some lateral distance though and presumably the boats further W will have a better angle and should pull ahead but still...

 

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9 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Where’s Jibeset when you need him?  The East looks good to me. Hoping Sam does it. 

Well, she has just taken a podium position and is fastest in the top 5!

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what's with the tracker not giving wind ?

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1 minute ago, Mid said:

what's with the tracker not giving wind ?

There's a button on the right hand side that turns it on.  It's a little hidden by the scroll bar, but it's fourth up from the bottom - "previsions meteo" if you hover over it.

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