Sign in to follow this  
Meat Wad

Mean while out in the back country, gybing at 70 MPH

Recommended Posts

Some people whine about selling their stuff. Other move on.

You could own one of these built ready to sail for 4K
Or you could buy the parts and build it yourself or you could buy the plans and really go garage build.
That is what Scott and a friend did. His wife you can see in the background in a Blokart.

Gybing at 70 MPH.

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where was the gybe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, bodega87 said:

Where was the gybe?

0.39

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

17 hours ago, bodega87 said:

Where was the gybe?

5 hours ago, Mid said:

0.39

it was rather quick but at 68 to 70 mph, everything is quick. Don't look down to your phone to text someone.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the windward wheel lifted up the first time I just about shit my pants... I would not want to see that thing capsize at 70 mph.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally a sailing clip with decent music.

Perfect example of an apparent wind boat sailing on its own wind. Just keep pulling the sail on.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note that the main luffs as it "gybes". At 65 mph with true wind of 20-25, the apparent wind is around 40 knots on the nose as it gybes. Mind blowing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/17/2020 at 3:13 PM, climenuts said:

When the windward wheel lifted up the first time I just about shit my pants... I would not want to see that thing capsize at 70 mph.

Can you imagine if the sheeting system jammed? And check out how the wheels are attached...2x8s or something that are flexing quite a bit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No gybes, wind always crosses the bow! First thing you need to learn sailing these. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/20/2020 at 7:30 PM, Rasputin22 said:

No gybes, wind always crosses the bow! First thing you need to learn sailing these. 

I have never tried it, but would love to give it a go.  Is it hard to keep track of the true wind angle or do you get a feel for it pretty quickly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking how much fun that looked until i saw the wheel come off the ground.  Nope!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What’s faster, these or ice boats?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mookiesurfs said:

What’s faster, these or ice boats?

Apparently ice boats (but the land speed record seems better substantiated)...anything over a hundred miles an hour is fast.

according to 'Boating Facts and Feats' (by Peter Johnson published 1976), the fastest official ice boat speed was recorded on Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin in 1938 by sailor John D. Buckstaff.  143 mph

 

the world land speed record for a wind-powered vehicle was set by the sand yacht Greenbird sailing at about three times the speed of the wind[15] with a recorded top speed of 202.9 kilometres per hour (126.1 mph)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it makes sense that iceboats would be faster.

In principle either type of vessel can have an equally efficient rig and low aerodynamic drag, so the remaining questions will be how well will the vessel track, and how much friction will there be.

Most of the losses will probably be in the tires for the land yacht, I would expect pretty large losses due to tire creep just keeping the vessel tracking, as well as rolling resistance. Its an interesting problem as you need decent lateral resistance but low rolling resistance.

Question: do land sailors play around with tire pressures to get the best balance between tracking and rolling resistance?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloodhound SSC has some interesting tyres.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, mookiesurfs said:

Bloodhound SSC has some interesting tyres.

Bloodhoud SSC did not have tyres as such. I was peripherally involved in the testing of the wheels. We had a big rig where they were spun up to speed to make sure that they held together. The test rig was enclosed in big tub to catch any fragments, The tub was in a separate room from the rest of the test machines, and no-one was allowed in that room when the tests were being run.

I played around with some interesting concepts for tyres` for downhill gravity cars. The objective was to minimize rolling resistance, but maintain traction for the corners. Most of the concepts we played with would not work for land yachts where the lateral traction is continuous. Never got to complete this work but it was fun trying to figure some of this out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, weren't they machined out of solid aluminum or something? It's not everyday a Yank gets to use "tyre"; I couldn't resist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went Ice boating on Lake Pewaukee at a North Sails mtg. a lot of years ago, blew my mind.  I remember Buddy Melges in the parking at Association Island NY at an Olympic classes regatta point to a car and say his ice boat accelerated faster than it by so much mere water sailors couldn't comprehend, he was right.  Miss the legends of the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/22/2020 at 11:15 AM, mookiesurfs said:

What’s faster, these or ice boats?

Ice boats were faster until GPS was invented. Then they got slower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/22/2020 at 2:42 PM, JohnMB said:

 

Question: do land sailors play around with tire pressures to get the best balance between tracking and rolling resistance?

 

Yes, the higher the pressure, the smaller the foot print. The lighter the craft, the lower the pressure, this achieving more lateral resistance. I sail with about 40 psi but the bigger guys use 50 +. This is in the OD Blokart.

I've seen tubes burst because of the pressure and then the heat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Meat Wad said:

Yes, the higher the pressure, the smaller the foot print. The lighter the craft, the lower the pressure, this achieving more lateral resistance. I sail with about 40 psi but the bigger guys use 50 +. This is in the OD Blokart.

I've seen tubes burst because of the pressure and then the heat.

Yea...  That's gotta be fun...  Is that the equivalent to a pitchpole in the dirt???  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this