Sign in to follow this  
Jules

For Lovers of Interesting Wood Grain

Recommended Posts

in his ts 55 review, at the 12 min mark when he's making the crosscut.. how does the fence clamp down to the piece or does it just ride on top?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

in his ts 55 review, at the 12 min mark when he's making the crosscut.. how does the fence clamp down to the piece or does it just ride on top?

 

 

Guide rails have rubber strips on the base for grip.

2EC0F0B2-9AC3-4827-98AE-205D176FB3C1.thumb.jpeg.1ba835120b3b6d46d6610af1df85d2f5.jpeg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

how does the fence clamp down to the piece or does it just ride on top?

With Festool, you can buy clamps that attach to the underside and that keeps the track firmly in place.  Some guys say the fence stays in place on it's own but I don't trust that.  It's pretty easy to knock it out of position. 

When I was working with the Festool track saw, I purchased a second 55" track and a kit that had the clamps and a piece of metal designed to join two tracks together.  It was a bitch to get the two tracks perfectly aligned.  An outfit called Betterly makes a foolproof tool for aligning the tracks but it's another $200!  And that angle guide that came with the kit was for shit.  So I returned the whole thing.

I have that Dewalt biscuit jointer in the other video.  I mainly use it to get boards flush, either flat or at 90 degrees.  It works great for that purpose.  But it's not structural and it won't keep together two boards that aren't properly prepared. 

When I was making the legs for a live edge table, I wanted the legs to angle out from the base.  I seriously thought about the Domino then but couldn't justify the cost.  So I went with blind dovetails.  I had no idea angled blind dovetails are one of the most difficult to make, especially when working with thick boards.  It took me over a month cuz I kept walking away in frustration.

LECT_001.jpg.9b7873412472e04f64ada374ecba7514.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Jules said:

I've heard similar kinds of comments about Mafell tools. 

I bought the Festool TS 55, two 55" guide rails and their angle unit accessory kit.  At the time it was around $1,000 for everything.  For that price I expected perfection.  I ended up returning everything and bought a Dewalt track saw kit which included 4' and 8' tracks.  Festool wanted over $300 for their 8' track.  The Dewalt kit cost me $600 and works just as well as the Festool. 

I have some Mafell stuff.  A track saw and their 10" circular saw.  Extremely well thought out tools.  But that 10" saw was $1900, and worth every penny.

I've been eyeing up their jigsaw as I think they have a much better blade design than anyone else.

I had a Makita track saw, one of my contractors borrowed it, and I got a check for it in return....  I was looking at the Festool saw to replace it, but they use the same garbage track that Makita uses.  The Mafell, it's basically idiot proof to put together multiple tracks.  Toting around a 10' long piece of fragile aluminium to jobsites and expecting it to survive long term, isn't very bright.

Festool is Europe's dewalt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Jules said:

 

I've had a lot of luck with this method.  

 

15 minute cabinet door.

  That was with our old door clamp too.  Now we've got a rotary that holds five at a time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Hatin' life said:

 Now we've got a rotary that holds five at a time.

You our the balles!                       :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Hatin' life said:

15 minute cabinet door.

That was with or old door clamp too.  Now we've got a rotary that holds five at a time.

I saw that video seems like years ago.  It's a lot like my shop except mine is smaller and doesn't have as many really cool tools and is a real pain to get anything done.  Other than that, it's the same. :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jules said:

I saw that video seems like years ago.  It's a lot like my shop except mine is smaller and doesn't have as many really cool tools and is a real pain to get anything done.  Other than that, it's the same. :wacko:

Sell it to you.  $1.3, it's all yours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

Sell it to you.  $1.3, it's all yours

I see what you're trying to do.  Convince me to trade shops with you.  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jules said:

I see what you're trying to do.  Convince me to trade shops with you.  ;)

I want out.  I'm over it.  I'll go get a job at Wal-Mart and tell hill people where to buy their cheap shit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Hatin' life said:

I want out.  I'm over it.  I'll go get a job at Wal-Mart and tell hill people where to buy their cheap shit.

You've been to the Charlotte Harbor Regatta.  Just move it down here and you guys can share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Hatin' life said:

I want out.  I'm over it.  I'll go get a job at Wal-Mart and tell hill people where to buy their cheap shit.

When I see videos of all this automated equipment, I've wondered how long it would take before woodworking got boring.  I work in a sardine can and am always one step away from tripping over something.  My last shop could hold all the tools and it was actually fun to work in.  Now I've got it broken up to an inside shop (one of the bedrooms) and the garage where the DC and larger tools are.  It's a pain in the ass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jules said:

When I see videos of all this automated equipment, I've wondered how long it would take before woodworking got boring.  I work in a sardine can and am always one step away from tripping over something.  My last shop could hold all the tools and it was actually fun to work in.  Now I've got it broken up to an inside shop (one of the bedrooms) and the garage where the DC and larger tools are.  It's a pain in the ass.

Actually, the automation made it fun again.  At least for me.  I had to teach myself Trig from youtube and a casio website because of the cnc.  I'm a problem solver, when the problems are gone, I'll start chewing on the furniture and shitting in the corner.

Somethings aren't problems, they're just a raging pain in the ass.  That's the stuff I'm over.  I run a tight ship, in the shop hardly anything goes wrong.  But outside.  **shudder** it's chaos and sadness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fat Point Jack said:

You've been to the Charlotte Harbor Regatta.  Just move it down here and you guys can share.

I flew through my main last time I was there....  Thank fuck the rest of the event was light air, my other main was a fuller cut which would've been a nightmare if the conditions were zesty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

I want out.  I'm over it.  I'll go get a job at Wal-Mart and tell hill people where to buy their cheap shit.

Even if you manage to get hired you won't last.

Trust me. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I hire one of you wood Maestro's make new cabinet doors for our kitchen here, at The Final Cafe??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

rusty15.jpg

What ist the bodey?  It lookes licke MDF.....   juste sayeng.                              :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jules said:

When I see videos of all this automated equipment, I've wondered how long it would take before woodworking got boring.  I work in a sardine can and am always one step away from tripping over something.  My last shop could hold all the tools and it was actually fun to work in.  Now I've got it broken up to an inside shop (one of the bedrooms) and the garage where the DC and larger tools are.  It's a pain in the ass.

I don't have a dedicated shop and REALLY wish I had the room. I have to pull the car out of the 1.5 car garage and setup/take down each day. Its fine but I lust for a workshop of any size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

What ist the bodey?  It lookes licke MDF.....   juste sayeng.                              :)

It's ash - the finish is a '60s chrysler gold base with "rust" applied on top.   It's a hand-built, really nice playing take on a Tele. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Even if you manage to get hired you won't last.

Trust me. ;)

Ha!  That's fucking funny right there.  You're likely correct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are so many better ways of doing that joint. Like buying the right tools to start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Some pretty wood grain I just got: 
rusty3.thumb.jpg.33f9090d4634fbe34e123a3f08bc2372.jpg

rusty15.jpg

That is one fugly, dirty looking guitar..... I'm sure it plays beautifully, but..... Damn! It's UGLY!

Looks like someone buried it in a garbage can of coffee grounds.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

Actually, the automation made it fun again.  At least for me.  I had to teach myself Trig from youtube and a casio website because of the cnc.  I'm a problem solver, when the problems are gone, I'll start chewing on the furniture and shitting in the corner.

Somethings aren't problems, they're just a raging pain in the ass.  That's the stuff I'm over.  I run a tight ship, in the shop hardly anything goes wrong.  But outside.  **shudder** it's chaos and sadness.

Maybe it's time to retool and start building boats.  Make videos, post them on YouTube and watch the money roll in.  Some of these people seem to be making a killing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

Somethings aren't problems, they're just a raging pain in the ass.  That's the stuff I'm over.  I run a tight ship, in the shop hardly anything goes wrong.  But outside.  **shudder** it's chaos and sadness.

As someone who loved my work....every day of it for over 4 decades......I have to say.......if it's really aggravating thats not healthy for you. You might consider a change that either eliminates the things you find so distressing or at least really minimizes them, or a change in occupation. Nothing is worth being jacked up all the time. Unless you have some reincarnation belief we only get one run at this and tomorrow isn't promised. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Point Break said:

I don't have a dedicated shop and REALLY wish I had the room. I have to pull the car out of the 1.5 car garage and setup/take down each day. Its fine but I lust for a workshop of any size.

You live in SoCal FFS - you can work outdoors all year round. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

You live in SoCal FFS - you can work outdoors all year round. :P

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Some pretty wood grain I just got: 
rusty3.thumb.jpg.33f9090d4634fbe34e123a3f08bc2372.jpg

rusty15.jpg

dang that looks nice,  doesn't look like it came from a fender shop,  custom?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Point Break said:

As someone who loved my work....every day of it for over 4 decades......I have to say.......if it's really aggravating thats not healthy for you. You might consider a change that either eliminates the things you find so distressing or at least really minimizes them, or a change in occupation. Nothing is worth being jacked up all the time. Unless you have some reincarnation belief we only get one run at this and tomorrow isn't promised. 

Sorta.  What I need to do is hire somebody to run the front end of this bitch.  I can handle just about any nightmare in the shop, because that's all on me.  Of there is a problem in the shop that isn't classified as an act of God, then I am the only one's feet that it can be laid at.  When there's fucktastophies onsite though, and I'm stuck dealing with shit that wasn't my fault, and I'm fucking paying for it, I want to murder people.  That's the stuff that drives me ab-solutely batshit.

I'm also getting real frustrated with contractors that bitch about whoever their current cabinetmaker is, and want a better product.  But, the cocksuckers aren't willing to pay for it.  Guess what sweetie, that extra 5% in quality, is going to cost you another 20% over what you're current.  They say they want a change, but when it comes down to it, they think that somebody is going to come up with something new from the last 10,000 years of woodworking and somehow magically make it better, and cheaper than the other guy.

I just need to be plopped down at my bench and yelled at until I'm jamming product out at an acceptable pace.  Cause that's what I'm good at.  Busting my ass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/17/2020 at 1:27 PM, billy backstay said:

We made a bar height dining table from the solid 3" Maple of an old Prep Cook table from a summer resort in East Haddam in the 50's.  It' alternating strip of Birdseye, Tiger and regular Maple.  Bought some pretty turned maple legs, a couple pieces of flat maple and corner brackets, and Bob's yer uncle!!  A friend who is an awesome painter, mixed up a bunch of different  colors and then painted it the same green as the legs on our bar stools we've had for 20 years. 

 

Mid asked for pics, so I took one.  Also, you can spot my "arsenal" LOL in the back left of the pic....

 

 

Maple Table.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

That is one fugly, dirty looking guitar..... I'm sure it plays beautifully, but..... Damn! It's UGLY!

Looks like someone buried it in a garbage can of coffee grounds.

It's named "Rusty".    I don't typically like "relic'd" anything - but, something about this one just hit me.  It does play wonderfully - the pickups are hand wound, and THICK. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

 

Mid asked for pics, so I took one.  Also, you can spot my "arsenal" LOL in the back left of the pic....

 

 

Maple Table.jpg

I like that BB - did you turn the legs, too?   Tell us again, please what the top is made from. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

I like that BB - did you turn the legs, too?   Tell us again, please what the top is made from. 

Thanks AGITC!

I bought the legs online, 60 bucks each.  Paid $300 or so for table top with metal legs.  Probably into it for around $600, but well worth it to us.

My OP:

"We made a bar height dining table from the solid 3" Maple of an old Prep Cook table from a summer resort in East Haddam in the 50's.  It's alternating strips of Birdseye, Tiger and regular Maple.  Bought some pretty turned maple legs, a couple pieces of flat maple and corner brackets, and Bob's yer uncle!!  A friend who is an awesome painter, mixed up a bunch of different  colors and then painted it the same green as the legs on our bar stools we've had for 20 years. "

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wife and I just finished a move.  She wanted a bigger kitchen.  The cabinet hardware is sub par and some of the drawers were trash can ready (dovetails don't guarantee high quality).  So I got the woodshop set up last week, bought a box of Blumotion undermount slides and re-read the instructions on the Akeda jig that I hadn't used in 5 years.  Had enough leftover oak and maple sitting around to make new drawers with 5/8" sides and 3/8 marine grade ply bottoms.  Oak for the front and back, maple for the sides.  There are solid cherry outer fronts that I reused.  Made the dividers to suit our needs.  Looks nice but more importantly feels nice to open and close.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Wife and I just finished a move.  She wanted a bigger kitchen.  The cabinet hardware is sub par and some of the drawers were trash can ready (dovetails don't guarantee high quality).  So I got the woodshop set up last week, bought a box of Blumotion undermount slides and re-read the instructions on the Akeda jig that I hadn't used in 5 years.  Had enough leftover oak and maple sitting around to make new drawers with 5/8" sides and 3/8 marine grade ply bottoms.  Oak for the front and back, maple for the sides.  There are solid cherry outer fronts that I reused.  Made the dividers to suit our needs.  Looks nice but more importantly feels nice to open and close.

Pics or it didn't happen.... ;-) 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Wife and I just finished a move.  She wanted a bigger kitchen.  The cabinet hardware is sub par and some of the drawers were trash can ready (dovetails don't guarantee high quality).  So I got the woodshop set up last week, bought a box of Blumotion undermount slides and re-read the instructions on the Akeda jig that I hadn't used in 5 years.  Had enough leftover oak and maple sitting around to make new drawers with 5/8" sides and 3/8 marine grade ply bottoms.  Oak for the front and back, maple for the sides.  There are solid cherry outer fronts that I reused.  Made the dividers to suit our needs.  Looks nice but more importantly feels nice to open and close.

Didn't happen without pics ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's approx 32 wide x 21 deep.  Dividers are leftover cherry from another project.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2020 at 11:25 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Nice joinery! 

 

Thanks.  The joy of hand cutting dovetails went away years ago for me, especially for kitchen drawers.  For small boxes I've developed a love of splined miters (although cleaning them up is a bit of a pain) so the grain can flow unimpeded around corners.  A few small projects pix below.  Next project is matching twin beds for the granddaughters.

 

 

IMG_2619.jpg

IMG_2656.jpg

IMG_2727.jpg

IMG_5362.jpg

IMG_5347.jpg

IMG_5390.jpg

IMG_2878.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OOH!!!!! That's one of those things that Dabs used to make!....... (But on a hook)..... Kinkier maybe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A hint on your spline cuts. If you use a "Lamelo" type machine to cut your slots (And yes it's so goddamned easy) you should think about temp gluing on little strips so the blow out isn't so blatant.

 If you're using a tablesaw, a zero clearance insert sled is the way to go.

 Other than that..... Very nice work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

A hint on your spline cuts. If you use a "Lamelo" type machine to cut your slots (And yes it's so goddamned easy) you should think about temp gluing on little strips so the blow out isn't so blatant.

 If you're using a tablesaw, a zero clearance insert sled is the way to go.

 Other than that..... Very nice work!

Thanks.  I use a zero clearance sled on the TS. The blow out actually on the splines from my clumsy technique trimming the splines (intentionally a bit proud) flush.  I use a no kerf flush cut hand saw but I get impatient - totally user error on my part. Need to pay more attention to blade orientation etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Thanks.  I use a zero clearance sled on the TS. The blow out actually on the splines from my clumsy technique trimming the splines (intentionally a bit proud) flush.  I use a no kerf flush cut hand saw but I get impatient - totally user error on my part. Need to pay more attention to blade orientation etc.

Be oune witha blade.............  na na na na na ............          TY Webbe                                                         :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/27/2020 at 1:08 PM, NaptimeAgain said:

Thanks.  The joy of hand cutting dovetails went away years ago for me, especially for kitchen drawers.  

I've never cut dovetails by hand.  I've made probably 5000+ dovetail drawers over the course of my career.  I don't think it's something I would enjoy, and I'm a little jealous of those that do, and more so of those that know how to sneak up on the fitment and get it just right.

I've got a job coming up with 116 drawers in birch, and a handful of walnut rollout trays.  Almost 600bd/ft of solid material going into those.  I'm pretty sure cutting that much by hand, should come with it's own suicide note.  A manifesto at the very least.  Before I had an automatic dovetailer, I cut them with a router and a jig.  It took more than a day just to cut the pins & tails on a job that size.  Driving home the steering wheel would be buzzing.  I don't miss that shit one bit.

 

The downside to cutting them with most machines is there's no room for anything in creativity.  This is the spacing, this is what you're stuck with.  Some of the dedicated cnc dovetailers you can do some cool shit, but I can't get anyone to pay the upcharge to offset the cost of an expensive machine.  The slight uptick in productivity isn't justifiable at this point either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/27/2020 at 1:25 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Nice joinery! 

 

understatement :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just resurfaced the kitchen bench top after 18 years of service.

My joinery in the corner.  Mixed local Australian hardwood.  It's very very hard stuff.

image.png.c48ee3a0227fdfb5291e97f8fca9b963.png

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

I've never cut dovetails by hand.  I've made probably 5000+ dovetail drawers over the course of my career.  I don't think it's something I would enjoy, and I'm a little jealous of those that do, and more so of those that know how to sneak up on the fitment and get it just right.

I've got a job coming up with 116 drawers in birch, and a handful of walnut rollout trays.  Almost 600bd/ft of solid material going into those.  I'm pretty sure cutting that much by hand, should come with it's own suicide note.  A manifesto at the very least.  Before I had an automatic dovetailer, I cut them with a router and a jig.  It took more than a day just to cut the pins & tails on a job that size.  Driving home the steering wheel would be buzzing.  I don't miss that shit one bit.

 

The downside to cutting them with most machines is there's no room for anything in creativity.  This is the spacing, this is what you're stuck with.  Some of the dedicated cnc dovetailers you can do some cool shit, but I can't get anyone to pay the upcharge to offset the cost of an expensive machine.  The slight uptick in productivity isn't justifiable at this point either.

I've only cut a few dovetails and have yet to enjoy a single one.  The angled half-blind dovetails I cut for a table base probably destroyed any chance of me ever doing it again.  And no one ever sees them.  They sit on the floor, out of sight.  I could have driven 16d nails into the joints and no one would have ever noticed.

I bought a Leigh 24" dovetail jig a long time ago.  Trying to set that up is as frustrating as hand cutting dovetails.  It was a waste of money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Hatin'Life , with a project with that many drawers why not outsource? all the drawers show up perfect, you can spec the hardware you'll use so the drawers show up ready to mount. I havent messed with a dovetail machine since I found these guys, custom can be done, spacing on dovetails can be spec'd , deal for you Americans is the US vs CDN dollars, everything for you is a 35% discount right now. Have a look at Distinctive Wood Products, Kitchener Ont. Can. 

I have to buy with the HudsonBay Peso...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, crankcall said:

@Hatin'Life , with a project with that many drawers why not outsource? all the drawers show up perfect, you can spec the hardware you'll use so the drawers show up ready to mount. I havent messed with a dovetail machine since I found these guys, custom can be done, spacing on dovetails can be spec'd , deal for you Americans is the US vs CDN dollars, everything for you is a 35% discount right now. Have a look at Distinctive Wood Products, Kitchener Ont. Can. 

I have to buy with the HudsonBay Peso...

A few reasons.

-We make good money on drawers.

-Every time I ask one out the salesman that come through peddling drawers and doors if they can build to my demands for color, grain matching, and sanding, they say no.

-Vertical integration is important to me.  If something is fucked up, or mis-ordered (not that I EVER make a mistake), I can have a replacement pretty quickly.  If it's mission critical, within an hour if I'm not waiting for panels to dry for a glue up.

And we use a weird grade of birch for drawers.

I always keep those companies in mind for when we're behind, or if something odd happens.  I just haven't had to do it yet.  The door/drawer guy keeps up pretty well.  We haven't been balls deep behind in over a year.

Screenshot_20200630-210420_Instagram.thumb.jpg.e966435ee574354ddee051f136235d77.jpg

Screenshot_20200630-210531_Instagram.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^

painfully perfect .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Mid said:

^

painfully perfect .

The trick is in the sanding.  Wood is natural, therefore a cunt to work with.  It'll break or tear when it shouldn't.  You could cut those in an edm machine out of metal perfectly every single time.  Not so with wood.  Our dovetailer is really well setup and dialed in, but cunt face wood doesn't care.  There's always some stuff that just doesn't go well.  I smear wood glue into the joint then belt sand.  Work through the pile that way, then go at them with an orbital with 150 removing all of the previous scratch.  They look as perfect as they can get.

 

Here's that same drawer at just assembly, no sanding.  It's pretty good, but it looks way better as a final product.

 

 

Screenshot_20200630-215440_Instagram.thumb.jpg.14f06e0b839501d483cb658d54075a39.jpg

 

My peers give me shit about putting the effort I do into drawers.  "It's just a drawer"  Yep, sure as fuck is, with my name on it.  Where do you draw the line?  Ah fuck it, it's just a drawer, just a cabinet, just a kitchen, just a house, just a child....  Somewhere in there I'd think it's time to take some pride in something.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Hatin' life said:

The trick is in the sanding. 

thanks for the before and after pics , shows exactly what you described .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Goes well with the fire stone patio.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Figured Brazilian Rosewood

 

IMG-20200705-074030875.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:
5 hours ago, Dog said:

IMG-20200705-074030875.jpg

don't wear a belt when you play that....

Safer still.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

don't wear a belt when you play that....

I don't even wear anything with buttons.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Dog said:
27 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

don't wear a belt when you play that....

I don't even wear anything with buttons.

coude rapp youselfe in bubbelle rapp mabey?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luthier work is pretty crazy.  I found a video of a younger guy building violins entirely by hand.  Definitely a skill set I do not possess.  Neat to watch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

Luthier work is pretty crazy.  I found a video of a younger guy building violins entirely by hand.  Definitely a skill set I do not possess.  Neat to watch.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the years I have bought a few Veritas hand planes of various types. Built a decent wall cabinet for them but hadn't used them much.  They got a workout over the weekend making matching twin beds for the granddaughters.  Lots of leg tapering.  Roughed on the bandsaw then used that big jointer plane to finish the legs.  So much nicer to make plane shavings than sawdust.  Sunlight exposure to darken the cherry.  

Pics 'cause it happened. :D

fnIBa7gzSS2iS%t41o1Yag.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, NaptimeAgain said:

 So much nicer tp make plane shavings than sawdust.

plusses oune!!!                               :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, NaptimeAgain said:

For really long shavings - softwood on a spill plane.

Did somebody say really long shavings?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/5/2020 at 6:49 AM, Dog said:

Figured Brazilian Rosewood

 

IMG-20200705-074030875.jpg

Figured Maple

Collings_I35Deluxe_LH_Caramel_85.thumb.jpg.237279512fa35442a76800657a128769.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Grande Mastere Dreade said:
On 7/5/2020 at 1:16 PM, Snaggletooth said:

coude rapp youselfe in bubbelle rapp mabey?

i have a story, but i'm still too pissed to tell it..

OK, coolle downe, mabey Thuresday youlle be reddey to tellus?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cabinetmaker, strangely doesn't mean architectural replication.  But, everybody assumes if you cut wood, it's all the same shit.

 

I got this way closer than I thought I was going to, in way less time than I thought I was going to.

Screenshot_20200706-190352_Instagram.jpg

Screenshot_20200706-190427_Instagram.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never cut dovetails with a router. I used to cut them entirely by hand. Then I made a jig to cut the "keys" on the table saw, and got really good at sneaking up on te line with the tails on the band saw..... A couple of quick slices with a razor sharp chisel and some careful chopping with a (once again) razor sharp chisel, and.... BINGO!

I had a blanket chest at a gallery, that a local craftsman declared was made by machine..... I asked him if he could get a machine to cut 6% dovetails at a random spacing faster than he could set up a machine.... He looked at the chest again, and said "Ain't no way any human cut those joints that tight!" and he walked out the door.

 Well... 40 years ago I couldn't cut those joints that tight. But 38 years ago I could, and I still can, if needed. Thank you Jim Krenov for teaching me patience.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

I asked him if he could get a machine to cut 6% dovetails at a random spacing faster than he could set up a machine....

Nowadays, with cnc dovetailers, a couple button pushes, and you're there.

I've got zero time to take such a project, but I really want to build one.  I want to see one with a horizontal spindle instead of vertical.  I think it'll be easier on the operator, and dust collection should be easily made perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

Nowadays, with cnc dovetailers, a couple button pushes, and you're there.

I've got zero time to take such a project, but I really want to build one.  I want to see one with a horizontal spindle instead of vertical.  I think it'll be easier on the operator, and dust collection should be easily made perfect.

Production and "craft" are two entirely different animals. I had to make a set of 100 identical drawers for an airline inter office mailbox (Had to as in my wife's boss asked me to do the job, even though I told him he could buy them from steelcase for half the price), and of course they had to be half blind dovetails, and have all different locks with one master key.....

 I farmed the drawers out to a company in Ohio. I had the drawers in just over a week, and at less than I could have bought the lumber for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/23/2020 at 9:01 PM, Hatin' life said:

I have some Mafell stuff.  A track saw and their 10" circular saw.  Extremely well thought out tools.  But that 10" saw was $1900, and worth every penny.

I've been eyeing up their jigsaw as I think they have a much better blade design than anyone else.

I had a Makita track saw, one of my contractors borrowed it, and I got a check for it in return....  I was looking at the Festool saw to replace it, but they use the same garbage track that Makita uses.  The Mafell, it's basically idiot proof to put together multiple tracks.  Toting around a 10' long piece of fragile aluminium to jobsites and expecting it to survive long term, isn't very bright.

I was considering selling my two Bosch jigsaws and buying a Festool Carvex when I ran across this jigsaw video of Mafell vs Festool. 

And Festool has that cheap dust collection extension.  I have something similar for my Bosch jigsaws and it can't handle taking the hose with it through a cut.  Mafell is about $100 more but you get an adaptable guide fence that is very versatile.   If you bought the Festool extras that gave you the same capabilities, the prices would be about the same.  The one downside to Mafell is they have only 2 outlets in the US.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites