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Jules

For Lovers of Interesting Wood Grain

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There are a lot of videos of guys slicing trees into flitches but this guy is the most entertaining I've seen.  You can tell he's really into the beauty of wood.  He splashes every flitch with water so you can see the grain.  He even makes red oak interesting.  This one is pecan

 

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51 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Thackes!  I licke zelkova and quattere sawne sycamore.     

I've seen videos of him slicing live oak, walnut, red oak and now pecan.  I'm not sure he does quartersawn wood.  He seems more interested in highly figured wood.

1 minute ago, Rum Runner said:

I want that band saw!! Awesome.

He made it. 

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1 hour ago, Jules said:
1 hour ago, Rum Runner said:

I want that band saw!! Awesome.

He made it. 

I want to see his planer. :D

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After a few years of watching Sampson Boat Co and Acorn to Arabella, it's a bit weird to see someone get excited about sapwood and bark inclusion! :o

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We made a bar height dining table from the solid 3" Maple of an old Prep Cook table from a summer resort in East Haddam in the 50's.  It' alternating strip of Birdseye, Tiger and regular Maple.  Bought some pretty turned maple legs, a couple pieces of flat maple and corner brackets, and Bob's yer uncle!!  A friend who is an awesome painter, mixed up a bunch of different  colors and then painted it the same green as the legs on our bar stools we've had for 20 years. 

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I’ve been interested in doing some inlay work with the base piece being some beautiful grained wood. I’ve done just a little with tile mosaic inlay but different wood seems like it would be kinda............zen. Maybe take a run at it later this year, I got lots of projects and deferred maintenance to get through first. 

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Lacewood

moo3.jpg

moo4.jpg

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1 hour ago, alphafb552 said:

After a few years of watching Sampson Boat Co and Acorn to Arabella, it's a bit weird to see someone get excited about sapwood and bark inclusion! :o

I think he sells a lot of the wood he mills.  And I've seen at least one instance of him working with epoxy in tables.  Which explains his excitement over wood you'd never want to see in a boat.

One tree he was cutting through had what looked like rebar in one location and possibly copper wire in another, like someone used the tree to hold up electrical wires and the tree grew around it.  After the rebar took a few teeth off his blade, he changed blades and kept cutting because he wanted the metals left in the slab.  He must go through a lot of blades.

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6 minutes ago, Jules said:

I think he sells a lot of the wood he mills.  And I've seen at least one instance of him working with epoxy in tables.  Which explains his excitement over wood you'd never want to see in a boat.

One tree he was cutting through had what looked like rebar in one location and possibly copper wire in another, like someone used the tree to hold up electrical wires and the tree grew around it.  After the rebar took a few teeth off his blade, he changed blades and kept cutting because he wanted the metals left in the slab.  He must go through a lot of blades.

In the seventies it was not uncommon to find bullets in the middle of a teak board

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I've got a big olive dining table at the farm with inlays but don't have a pic. Here's the table at the cottage.

37021468264_7b1e25a9b2_b.jpg

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7 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

I've got a big olive dining table at the farm with inlays but don't have a pic. Here's the table at the cottage.

37021468264_7b1e25a9b2_b.jpg

Hooooleeeee shit!!

  That spread could feed a medium size african village for a week!

 

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9 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

I've got a big olive dining table at the farm with inlays but don't have a pic. Here's the table at the cottage.

37021468264_7b1e25a9b2_b.jpg

Nice piece of spalted Maple. I was not impressed with the Pecan log.

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hemp-wood-table-monkwood.jpg

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6 hours ago, Jules said:

There are a lot of videos of guys slicing trees into flitches but this guy is the most entertaining I've seen.  You can tell he's really into the beauty of wood.  He splashes every flitch with water so you can see the grain.  He even makes red oak interesting.  This one is pecan

 

My favourite saw miller.

 

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1 hour ago, Jules said:

I think he sells a lot of the wood he mills.  And I've seen at least one instance of him working with epoxy in tables.  Which explains his excitement over wood you'd never want to see in a boat.

One tree he was cutting through had what looked like rebar in one location and possibly copper wire in another, like someone used the tree to hold up electrical wires and the tree grew around it.  After the rebar took a few teeth off his blade, he changed blades and kept cutting because he wanted the metals left in the slab.  He must go through a lot of blades.

Norm Abrams did some shows about the demo of a railroad bridge across the Great Salt Lake. It was huge redwood timbers from 100 years ago and they were perfect because they had been pickled by the salt.

He ran a metal detector over each piece before he started milling it down and he must have pulled a couple of hundred pounds of hidden metal out of them.

Damn that wood was gorgeous. First growth redwood - talk about unobtanium.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Jules said:

I think he sells a lot of the wood he mills.  And I've seen at least one instance of him working with epoxy in tables.  Which explains his excitement over wood you'd never want to see in a boat.

One tree he was cutting through had what looked like rebar in one location and possibly copper wire in another, like someone used the tree to hold up electrical wires and the tree grew around it.  After the rebar took a few teeth off his blade, he changed blades and kept cutting because he wanted the metals left in the slab.  He must go through a lot of blades.

that's what metal detectors are for,  spotting that hidden metal crap before you destroy you blades, surprised he doesn't use one..

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1 hour ago, austin1972 said:

I've got a big olive dining table at the farm with inlays but don't have a pic. Here's the table at the cottage.

37021468264_7b1e25a9b2_b.jpg

dude, those are the biggest fucking potatoes i've seen...   and when can i come over for dinner?

 

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Have made a few slab tables with iron legs.  The imperfections are part of the appeal.

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2 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I was not impressed with the Pecan log.

Me to, he caulled allotte of defecttes 'detailles',                                            :)

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1 hour ago, Snaggletooth said:

Me to, he caulled allotte of defecttes 'detailles',                                            :)

Like the car restorers who call rust & rot "patina".

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13 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

dude, those are the biggest fucking potatoes i've seen...   and when can i come over for dinner?

 

Any time. The more the merrier.
The beach is free and the water is clean although sometimes cold when the Lake upwells.

 

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16 hours ago, billy backstay said:

We made a bar height dining table from the solid 3" Maple of an old Prep Cook table from a summer resort in East Haddam in the 50's.  It' alternating strip of Birdseye, Tiger and regular Maple.  Bought some pretty turned maple legs, a couple pieces of flat maple and corner brackets, and Bob's yer uncle!!  A friend who is an awesome painter, mixed up a bunch of different  colors and then painted it the same green as the legs on our bar stools we've had for 20 years. 

pic's ?

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13 hours ago, NaptimeAgain said:

Have made a few slab tables with iron legs.  The imperfections are part of the appeal.

My first slab project was a kitchen island countertop.  It turned out so well, I made a coffee table next.  That slab had a lot of imperfections in the form of rot.  What a nightmare!  After a lot of messing around, I finally settled on epoxy to fill the voids.  It soaked up a gallon of epoxy.  It just kept disappearing into the voids.

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17 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

dude, those are the biggest fucking potatoes i've seen...   and when can i come over for dinner?

 

 

Fuck the taters, those are the nicest hunks of beef ever!!  I thought he couldn't afford the steaks he grows??

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3 hours ago, Mid said:

pic's ?

I had some on my phone, but can't find now, will take more and post.  Not sure I remember how to post a pic from my phone...??

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22 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Fuck the taters, those are the nicest hunks of beef ever!!  I thought he couldn't afford the steaks he grows??

I only eat beef a couple times per year but when I do, it's big and prime (bone-in ribeye in that case).

Normally, I eat seafood when possible. I love sushi and shellfish.

But yes, I can't afford my beef. My cattle are beyond butcher USDA prime...Lazy and custom bred. Those fuckers eat better than I do and have better hair.

5883132713_0696b20c49_b.jpg

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My first house had pecan/hickory wood floors...  why would anyone cover them with carpet?  But, looking a gift horse in the mouth, I am glad they did, it helped preserve the floors..

Not ours, but pretty darn close to it..

91coIx2TmPL._AC_SX425_.jpg

 

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I don't like that at all - reminds me of that incised pressure treated wood.

image.png.6ca1f39c0d33eb159cfa5173bab33131.png

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You're forgetting the best wood for boats, Kauri

 

image.jpeg.27f4ab2001671eb4b8393f31f9af3c08.jpeg

 

 

 

check the vid out you get an understanding of how magnificent these trees are;

 

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7 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

Farmhouse wood. Built in 1851.

3296112644_42dba4d91f_b.jpg

 

3297025484_edf612f173_b.jpg

ahhh..asbestos and lead paint

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Water driven saw mill in Switzerland 

Switzerland 059.JPG

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Switzerland 062.JPG

Switzerland 063.JPG

 

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As long as we're talking wood grain and beauty......check out these instruments made by Robb Brophy of Elkhorn Mandolins. Pure exquisitely beautiful wood handcrafted into spectacular instruments. Below is the link to his instrument page. I own the F5 Curly Mango/Redwood #46. It's the second link below. I just love this guys work.

http://www.elkhornmandolins.com/instruments1.html

http://www.elkhornmandolins.com/f-5-46---custom-mango.html

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Point Break said:

As long as we're talking wood grain and beauty......check out these instruments made by Robb Brophy of Elkhorn Mandolins. Pure exquisitely beautiful wood handcrafted into spectacular instruments. Below is the link to his instrument page. I own the F5 Curly Mango/Redwood #46. It's the second link below. I just love this guys work.

Firste time I evere secant linked in my life butte gotta admitte "Thast Hotte"...........              :)

936172_orig.jpeg

:)

 

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I don't think I'll ever get the appeal of the slab thing.

Most wood is worthless for anything other than animal bedding.  Then people want it in their kitchen.  And it's a mother fucker to get anything of any length straight without grinding up a shit load of material into chips.

 

I wish I had some pictures still on my phone of this island in the works.  The whole thing cantilevered out on the backside and the one end.  Lots of steel hidden in there.  Some big scary joints cut on the router too, which was pretty cool.  The long leg was one piece, the wide and short end had to be glued up.

20190911_094239.jpg

20190911_094226.jpg

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7 minutes ago, Hatin' life said:

I don't think I'll ever get the appeal of the slab thing.

Most wood is worthless for anything other than animal bedding.  Then people want it in their kitchen.  And it's a mother fucker to get anything of any length straight without grinding up a shit load of material into chips.

 

I wish I had some pictures still on my phone of this island in the works.  The whole thing cantilevered out on the backside and the one end.  Lots of steel hidden in there.  Some big scary joints cut on the router too, which was pretty cool.  The long leg was one piece, the wide and short end had to be glued up.

20190911_094239.jpg

20190911_094226.jpg

Theire ist no rushe........ tacke perfectte picte, and juste unloade on us........ we cane tacke it....... realley...............               :)

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5 hours ago, Point Break said:

As long as we're talking wood grain and beauty......check out these instruments made by Robb Brophy of Elkhorn Mandolins. Pure exquisitely beautiful wood handcrafted into spectacular instruments. Below is the link to his instrument page. I own the F5 Curly Mango/Redwood #46. It's the second link below. I just love this guys work.

http://www.elkhornmandolins.com/instruments1.html

http://www.elkhornmandolins.com/f-5-46---custom-mango.html

 

 

Beautiful workmanship and attention to detail.  

I can just imagine the pleasure of playing such a beautiful instrument.

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7 hours ago, BravoBravo said:

ahhh..asbestos and lead paint

Too early for asbestos but lead paint is likely.

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I am not a big slab guy but I just saw this one on woodworking page I follow, exceptional expect for the legs/stand 

 

slabm.jpg

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13 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

I don't think I'll ever get the appeal of the slab thing.

Most wood is worthless for anything other than animal bedding.  Then people want it in their kitchen.  And it's a mother fucker to get anything of any length straight without grinding up a shit load of material into chips.

 

I wish I had some pictures still on my phone of this island in the works.  The whole thing cantilevered out on the backside and the one end.  Lots of steel hidden in there.  Some big scary joints cut on the router too, which was pretty cool.  The long leg was one piece, the wide and short end had to be glued up.

20190911_094239.jpg

20190911_094226.jpg

Is that house 1/2 way to Australia   down under from here?

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On 6/17/2020 at 12:18 PM, austin1972 said:

I've got a big olive dining table at the farm with inlays but don't have a pic. Here's the table at the cottage.

37021468264_7b1e25a9b2_b.jpg

What’s for desert, heart medicine?  

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16 hours ago, austin1972 said:

Farmhouse wood. Built in 1851.

3296112644_42dba4d91f_b.jpg

 

3297025484_edf612f173_b.jpg

Floor Srceams CREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEKKKKKKKKKKKKK..... ;)

 

 

Love it tho...  

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No creakeing. The joys of virgin timber. Balloon construction with fire breaks staggered. Not easy to insulate but it's a brick of a house. Horsehair, plaster and slats for walls.

It's old and not cheap to operate. 2 50K furnaces and 1 60K wood insert.

Blankets are your friend in Janurary.

My house in town is like $45-$55 to heat. And it has A/C.

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Good to hear, My Gmas house was like that...  Fond (creaky) memories...  ;)

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2 hours ago, VWAP said:

Is that house 1/2 way to Australia   down under from here?

Depends where you start from, and which way you go?

 

It's in Minneapolis.  

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38 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

No creakeing. The joys of virgin timber. Balloon construction with fire breaks staggered. Not easy to insulate but it's a brick of a house. Horsehair, plaster and slats for walls.

It's old and not cheap to operate. 2 50K furnaces and 1 60K wood insert.

Blankets are your friend in Janurary.

My house in town is like $45-$55 to heat. And it has A/C.

Man, I hated fires in balloon construction. The fire stops are never intact, over the years various “improvements” result in vertical penetrations that make vertical fire spread an almost certainty. Fire on the ground floor? Better head to the attic because it’s very likely it’s there now too. I also hated the amount of damage we had to do opening walls in order to access the void space and make sure there isn’t hidden fire. Balloon construction often includes knee walls in the second story or attic which also creates voids for hidden fire. 
 

But boy oh boy......they sure built them beautiful. I look at the soulless aspects of the cookie cutter modern mid price suburban construction and think........oh well.

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On 6/18/2020 at 11:27 AM, SloopJonB said:

I don't like that at all - reminds me of that incised pressure treated wood.

image.png.6ca1f39c0d33eb159cfa5173bab33131.png

You should see what it does to tool edges.

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17 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

Most wood is worthless for anything other than animal bedding.  Then people want it in their kitchen.  And it's a mother fucker to get anything of any length straight without grinding up a shit load of material into chips.

I wish I had some pictures still on my phone of this island in the works.  The whole thing cantilevered out on the backside and the one end.  Lots of steel hidden in there. 

Sounds like you're fighting the natural tendencies of the wood.  Tough battle to win. 

Yeah, a lot ends up on the floor but I do it for enjoyment.  And when something turns out well, it's pretty cool.

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28 minutes ago, Jules said:

Sounds like you're fighting the natural tendencies of the wood.  Tough battle to win. 

Yeah, a lot ends up on the floor but I do it for enjoyment.  And when something turns out well, it's pretty cool.

Yep.  You relive stress in the material, it's going to do whatever it wants to.  And when you can't glue it up, you're dealing with grain going almost every direction, you're fucked.  Then throw ten feet of length into the mix.  I think that one slab started out 3" thick, it finished out at 2¼" if I remember right.  I surfaced the whole thing on the router, even that sucked having to flip pig over constantly trying to keep everything flat and consistent.

 

I'm just bitter because I under bid....

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2 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

Yep.  You relive stress in the material, it's going to do whatever it wants to.  [b/]And when you can't glue it up, you're dealing with grain going almost every direction, you're fucked.  Then throw ten feet of length into the mix.  I think that one slab started out 3" thick, it finished out at 2¼" if I remember right.  I surfaced the whole thing on the router, even that sucked having to flip pig over constantly trying to keep everything flat and consistent.

 

I'm just bitter because I under bid....

I was making a teak cover board for a large sport fish , this was to be the board across the transom. I’d spent hours flipping boards selecting what I needed. The board was 18’x14”x5/4, I my first cut before taking it to the thickness sander was to cut a few inches off the ends that were nasty. About 3/4 of the way thru the cut the board exploded with a crack that ran almost the full length of the board and the gap at the end of the crack was about 3” wide, LoL that thing had been waiting years for some relief 

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6 hours ago, VWAP said:

Is that house 1/2 way to Australia   down under from here?

After 12 hours of earthly rotation viola.

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2 hours ago, Priscilla said:

After 12 hours of earthly rotation viola.

A7F0EB82-1EC6-432A-A7E4-3E749FA88FC5.thumb.jpeg.ead9a575aac192ad88cf91bc0c3dcd52.jpegB1E62B09-1A20-4C81-A3D2-133FC7CDDF05.jpeg.fbf36d5dc0880cc6c48dc7c1cd71afe1.jpeg

Not my style of decorating but I think its beautiful. 

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6 hours ago, Jules said:

You should see what it does to tool edges.

I was given the work order for about 40’ of hand rails for a boat show booth , the wood chosen was Jatoba mother fucker ! It is so hard it chattered going through the shaper , long boarding the bumps and final sanding was a miserable experience, the wood is so hard it literally breaks the grit off the sandpaper 

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43 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

I was given the work order for about 40’ of hand rails for a boat show booth , the wood chosen was Jatoba mother fucker ! It is so hard it chattered going through the shaper , long boarding the bumps and final sanding was a miserable experience, the wood is so hard it literally breaks the grit off the sandpaper 

It looks good but man.... 6/4 stock that tapers 1/4" in thickness over 10'.  Between that, the bumpy resawn faces, the light cuts needed and the question marks it turns into once the cutting begins its a breakout nightmare.  

Funny, I get a sore throat when cutting Jatoba, but not from sanding it.  It's the only wood I've had a reaction to. 

Well that and Wenge slivers. 

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1 hour ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Funny, I get a sore throat when cutting Jatoba,

You just need to stop screaming MOTHER FUCKER! while you cut it.

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wow,  watched a video on 10 woodworking tools you must have...  googled one of them and selected the amazon link...  one of the suggestions at the top of the page was another tool that was mentioned in the video...

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7 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

wow,  watched a video on 10 woodworking tools you must have...  googled one of them and selected the amazon link...  one of the suggestions at the top of the page was another tool that was mentioned in the video...

When I got serious about woodworking I started with Lie-Nielsen hand planes and chisels.  Their planes are Western style.  But for hand saws I went with Japanese saws.  Later I learned that Japanese planes, like their saws, were designed to work on the pull action.  I've often been tempted to buy one to see if I prefer pull over push in hand planes.

But what really fascinates me is Japanese wood joints.  This guy, Dorian Bracht, has a number of videos I've been binging on lately.  I think this is the one that first got me hooked.

 

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40 minutes ago, Jules said:

When I got serious about woodworking I started with Lie-Nielsen hand planes and chisels.  Their planes are Western style.  But for hand saws I went with Japanese saws.  Later I learned that Japanese planes, like their saws, were designed to work on the pull action.  I've often been tempted to buy one to see if I prefer pull over push in hand planes.

But what really fascinates me is Japanese wood joints.  This guy, Dorian Bracht, has a number of videos I've been binging on lately.  I think this is the one that first got me hooked.

My skills are not worthy of watching that video, that is stuff I can only dream of doing.

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16 hours ago, Priscilla said:

After 12 hours of earthly rotation viola.

A7F0EB82-1EC6-432A-A7E4-3E749FA88FC5.thumb.jpeg.ead9a575aac192ad88cf91bc0c3dcd52.jpegB1E62B09-1A20-4C81-A3D2-133FC7CDDF05.jpeg.fbf36d5dc0880cc6c48dc7c1cd71afe1.jpeg

I like it !...minimalism .. 

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1 hour ago, Jules said:

When I got serious about woodworking I started with Lie-Nielsen hand planes and chisels.  Their planes are Western style.  But for hand saws I went with Japanese saws.  Later I learned that Japanese planes, like their saws, were designed to work on the pull action.  I've often been tempted to buy one to see if I prefer pull over push in hand planes.

But what really fascinates me is Japanese wood joints.  This guy, Dorian Bracht, has a number of videos I've been binging on lately.  I think this is the one that first got me hooked.

 

 

 

Amazing!!!  What an elegant solution!  I was surprised to see him hammering in the last two pieces with a steel hammer, instead of a hard rubber or plastic one??

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

Amazing!!!  What an elegant solution!  I was surprised to see him hammering in the last two pieces with a steel hammer, instead of a hard rubber or plastic one??

I'd guess if he was building the real thing he would have reached for a block of wood to protect the furniture.  Even a rubber mallet can damage the wood.

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On 6/17/2020 at 10:51 AM, Point Break said:

I’ve been interested in doing some inlay work with the base piece being some beautiful grained wood. I’ve done just a little with tile mosaic inlay but different wood seems like it would be kinda............zen. Maybe take a run at it later this year, I got lots of projects and deferred maintenance to get through first. 

Just on the odd chance you haven't already heard of it...google "sketch face veneer". Saw some mind blowing stuff on some doors recently. The processes, whatever they are, have improved over the last decade. 

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6 hours ago, Jules said:

When I got serious about woodworking I started with Lie-Nielsen hand planes and chisels.  Their planes are Western style.  But for hand saws I went with Japanese saws.  Later I learned that Japanese planes, like their saws, were designed to work on the pull action.  I've often been tempted to buy one to see if I prefer pull over push in hand planes.

But what really fascinates me is Japanese wood joints.  This guy, Dorian Bracht, has a number of videos I've been binging on lately.  I think this is the one that first got me hooked.

 

some time ago, i saw videos of japanese woodworkers making joints for huge beams by hand, it was amazing the accuracy and fit they achieved.. and I mean having to have a crane to lift the beam sized beam..   

my wife has been watching videos about the megalithic structures around the world where walls are built with huge boulders  interlocked together with utmost precision   and always it comes down to aliens, giant beings, forgotten technology etc..  but i'm amazed that no one talks about the determination of an artisan craftsman with simple tools..   one day historians will learn about team lifting using a simple fulcrum being driven by a project manager

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On 6/18/2020 at 7:44 PM, Snaggletooth said:

Theire ist no rushe........ tacke perfectte picte, and juste unloade on us........ we cane tacke it....... realley...............               :)

I found pictures.

The slab when I picked it up.

 20190730_181546.thumb.jpg.896393961e102f994bebc6e8144d6060.jpg

 

Flattening the pig fucker on the router.  Which required some cheating to make it work.  Basically creating points that could be used as a reference when having to reposition it.

20190731_143445.thumb.jpg.4c3fcdc12ada3ca1d08ccf787cecbbee.jpg

 

 

One side of the corner joint, and the grooves for the steel supports to hold it.

20190807_063803.thumb.jpg.58b88f0651fe9d84b39d4c9bfe52427e.jpg

 

 

For whatever reason, all of my pictures are sideways...   I can't upload another picture either, even if I start another post.

 

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2 hours ago, Hatin' life said:

For whatever reason, all of my pictures are sideways...   I can't upload another picture either, even if I start another post.

You provide the wood porn and I will edit:D
F0D000F5-4D54-4391-9CF7-BBB490643EA9.thumb.jpeg.e7d692c847d8a8ed2ccfd276a7334ad3.jpeg
BA7D41B0-4EB0-4BB9-B3E4-CE336D6095CD.thumb.jpeg.2be79d193380e12dd7f6270d832e200d.jpeg

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@Hatin' life

Ya know, for a guy that does an awful lot of bitching and moaning, you do some pretty nice work.

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17 hours ago, Priscilla said:

I pour myself a green tea and watch this guy find it very therapeutic after a long day on the building site.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7FkqjV8SU5I8FCHXQSQe9Q

 

 

Watching this I see what Jules was saying about the Japanese using hand planes that one pulls, instead of pushing.  Looks more efficient to me, but I'm certainly no expert.  Last time I made something really nice out of wood, was a small shelf cupboard, in High School Wood Shop 50 years ago...:D

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There is some incredible work here.

 

My wife came up with this:

Divinycell foam to shape of the old ply tabletop

F2AFFD5E-160D-4CE0-B18F-80BEEB8D3E13.jpeg
 

then laminated ribbon mahogany veneer to the foam and covered the edges with carbon fibre

224B791B-C02C-4FE0-8738-B5C9D1C90992.jpeg
 

then finished with epoxy. Less than half the weight of the old top and still looks fairly stock 

 

43C82E1F-15C3-453F-944B-8730CCA5B708.jpeg

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Nice Job, Max!  Would have been a tad nicer with the wood veneer on the edges, no??

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

Nice Job, Max!  Would have been a tad nicer with the wood veneer on the edges, no??

Not to us... wood edges are... redundant

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21 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Dominoes are the shit. 

Love mine.

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Speaking of grain, check out Lou's previous and current vids:

 

 

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Sometimes you don’t need wood-

 

5E83EFDE-B127-4993-97CA-C1A3EC020C57.jpeg

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The other side of the joint

 

20190807_063825.thumb.jpg.0e798d787276d38adac628771e450a1b.jpg

 

and assembled

 

20190807_085545.thumb.jpg.d1afae3786450dcf56050499f3cfe4f2.jpg20190807_085614.thumb.jpg.3f24ba7bfc1cc83c64aa2616a1b6f15b.jpg

 

 

I had to open the pictures on the computer and just resave them from an editing software.

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On 6/20/2020 at 4:52 PM, Priscilla said:

I pour myself a green tea and watch this guy find it very therapeutic after a long day on the building site.

Thack you.  Verrey nice.                                                   :)

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