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So, I have taken a project.  A quixotic venture and evidence of my declining judgement.  

My fate is now intertwined with that of a  35 year old aluminum boat.   She has great sailing attributes, she’s a proven passage maker and I love looking at her.   Unfortunately, she has been on the hard for several years.  Her previous owners lived aboard for 14 years and have offered invaluable help in getting to understand the boat.  She was designed by Dieter Empacher and is essentially an aluminum analog of a Little Harbor yacht of the same vintage.  
 

Her previous owners took all required care and made many upgrades of which I am very fortunate.  Paint is only six years old. Teak around a dozen years old and dirty but very thick. New sails.  Main used less than ten times.  There are spares and tools to survive a zombie apocalypse onboard.  
 

Nonetheless she is an aging beauty with need of some tlc.  The idea is to respect the former owner’s knowledge and start with small obvious work and progress to more ambitious changes when I have more faith in my judgement and familiarity with the boat.  
 

I spent a lot of time with my grandfather (an engineer) upside down working on a pump or hydraulic line (etc.)  on his ever changing motor yachts.  I also learned to dock a 40 ton motor boat at age 16.   At 18, my dad lent me his 40’ sloop.  In short,  I’ve sailed boats and raced boats for many years and owned a j-24 and c&c 27. Nonetheless, this is the first boat I’ve ever owned with complex systems and the additional risk of electrolysis sinking her. A lot to learn but that was part of the attraction to the boat.  The need for work was also an attraction.   I think work on the boat is the best way to learn how the boat’s systems work.

For now, item one is a battery replacement which is complicated by plumbing and aluminum infrastructure to be removed to access the batteries.  The yard has been bending over backwards to try to fit my work in while servicing long standing clients etc.  
 

While that work is being done, I want to focus on cleaning.  Am emptying all of the inventory into plastic boxes to be removed and sorted onshore. Much will be either discarded or stored on land.  Key and often used inventory will be returned after a cleaning of the boat’s interior.  
 

I am removing all of the soft goods and other sundry items so I can do a deep clean.  
 

Right now my immediate nightmare is the bilge.  I have anxiety about the possibility that stray washers or other metal bits could be in the dirty bilge.  I want to do a deep cleaning but am unsure how to best do it.  She’s on the hard. I’ve been thinking  about a power washer with detergent and then a wet dry vacuum to empty the bilge water.  There are many areas of the bilge with very limited access. 
 

As long as the feedback is helpful and you care to read about it, I’ll share elements of my journey.  It won’t be short.  It won’t be easy and it won’t be inexpensive but it’s a journey I’ve signed up for eyes wide open.  I’ll do my best to be frugal but will also be fair to the yards and service providers.  If I do a big refit, then I’ll want to be involved or at least present to learn while work is done.  I figure that refit work I participate in contributes to my understanding of the ship’s systems.  
 

I have someone coming next week to discuss electronics.  I’m a big believer in ipad’s for navigation but she has B&G instruments from the 1980’s.  They have to go.  Museum pieces.  
 

Feel free to ask questions or make suggestions.  I’m a Student Driver and eager to learn.  
 

 

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Hire people to dive the bilge.

Paint the teak with latex house paint (brown).

Paint one side of the boat blue, the other side blue.

Find some pretty ladies who will hang out on your boat in scanty clothing.

Have I missed anything?

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16 minutes ago, Student_Driver said:

Mega woofers, lights and a disco ball?

The stripper pole.

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Despite the snark above, you’ve got yourself a lovely looking boat.  Older aluminum boats scare the piss out of me, however.  Have you had the hull audio gauged?  

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She's beautiful and your proposal seems very sensible.

I'd clean her up, buy an oversized modern anchor, and go sailing. Fix what's required as it becomes obvious.

What's your intended use? Weekend sailing and holidays, or round the world live aboard? I only ask because your electronics requirements will be very different.

I'm not sure how much electronics you really need. I think many cruisers have far more than they need.

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Buy the two books available about alu boatbuilding  to understand the material. And how corrosion can look like.
Best statement in this video, it is not the question why Alu corrodes, but why it is not.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeFTEzeX56k
Clean every part of the boat with a toothbrush and your nose close by the surface.
Start with beneath the waterline.
Did 2 year of maintenance on a alu racer, keep it dry and no foreign objects made of metal. Still inspection every month showed a coin, a bolt or paper-clip.

Nice boat BTW.

 

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I'd do as good a job as possible of cleaning the bilges and find someone to ultrasound the hull. Then you'll have a decent level of knowledge about the hull integrity.

Also look closely for fatigue cracks as aluminium is prone to it.

Friend has a 50' ally boat, it's about to have a 1200 x 1500 chunk of plate cut out due to corrosion. No big deal but it's a bit too wasted away for comfort.

Don't sweat the electronics and other stuff until you're happy with the hull condition.

Bit busy ATM but happy to comment as time goes on.

Oh yes I'd peel off every bit of wood covering up the metal but that's me - I hate wood over metal it always leads to tears, just a question of how long it takes.

FKT

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Thank for the feedback. There was a survey of the hull.  Corrosion was measured to be less than 8%.  Hull is massively overbuilt but still cleaning all of the nooks and crannies will be a knuckle bashing ordeal.   
 

Here’s an excerpt:  Complete and careful inspection was made of all available bilge spaces. The bilges are painted aluminum with a good portion of the coatings peeling. There is some oxidation to the aluminum hull plate vat the intersect to frames. Several ultra-sonic readings were taken from the inside of the vessel, using the as built plans as the base line for the original thickness. We found the vessel to have an overall deterioration of less than 8%. These readings were randomly taken in areas of the bilge accessible without removal of interferences. Due to the fairing and epoxy coating readings cannot be taken in a systematic grid from the outside without removal the fairing compound and epoxy coating. 

 

 

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I nearly choked when I saw the ad: 52 feet(!)  Holy crap, that's a big boat.  The breaker panel looks like something used to program ICBM launches on submarines.

It has nice lines, though. Enjoy!

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Ajax.  I wanted bigger and got convinced that this was as big as I should go at this time.  A good decision for sure.  

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42 minutes ago, Student_Driver said:

Ajax.  I wanted bigger and got convinced that this was as big as I should go at this time.  A good decision for sure.  

Just imagine the places you can go. I'll bet that boat has long legs.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I nearly choked when I saw the ad: 52 feet(!)  Holy crap, that's a big boat.  The breaker panel looks like something used to program ICBM launches on submarines.

It has nice lines, though. Enjoy!

I was thinking the same thing.  I think the guy who designed the breaker panel was the same one who designed the mast winch layout and the instrument setup.  Why install just one when we can install 4.  Or 7.  Or 60.  Holy crap.

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Great looking boat, that keel looks ahead of her time. Who built her, PJ? Luke?

She needs to be tidied, but I'm guessing you got a banging deal on a great boat. Just wait until you price a new set of 3Di's. 

With a bow thruster she should be pretty easy to handle around the dock.

Congratulations!!!!!

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Sounds like you have plenty of enthusiasm for the project, student driver.  It will be worth the effort.

I've got a 44 year old aluminum boat. Been in the family since new.

A few years ago I gutted/cleaned the bilges and rebuilt the cabin sole with huge access hatches everywhere - highly recommended.

uA0LV2o.jpg

 

mwJdite.jpg

 

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Decluttering and cleaning is tedious and time intensive, but not technically difficult. The problem may be the multiple complex systems in place on such a large boat. Based on your pics and the survey much of it is going to have to come out to confirm the integrity of the hull, then you get into the mission creep of replacing stuff while it is out anyway. Since some of it is decades old that may be a good thing, but as you have mentioned not inexpensive. 

A final thought, most of the time advice is worth what you paid for, but anything contributed by Panope is pure gold. His ingenuity and craftsmanship is unmatched.

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Cleaning the bilge is important. Aluminum doesn't like standing water or staying wet with salt water in the bilges.  But I'd say don't panic over a s.s. fastener in the bilge but be aware the copper (or bronze alloys with copper in them) is not good. A clean dry aluminum boat will last. Aluminum does worst in tropical conditions with high moisture. Also beware of poultice corrosion where water is trapped between XX and the aluminum.

Don't throw away spares or odd things you cannot understand. They probably have a use somewhere aboard.

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8 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Ajax.  I wanted bigger and got convinced that this was as big as I should go at this time.  A good decision for sure.  

I admire your balls!!  What a great boat. It is BIG!  Will be really nice when done, good luck with it.  I don’t think I could manage that project without getting cold sweats.  

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5 hours ago, Panope said:

Sounds like you have plenty of enthusiasm for the project, student driver.  It will be worth the effort.

I've got a 44 year old aluminum boat. Been in the family since new.

A few years ago I gutted/cleaned the bilges and rebuilt the cabin sole with huge access hatches everywhere - highly recommended.

uA0LV2o.jpg

 

mwJdite.jpg

 

Boy wouldn’t I love to know how you got the bilge that clean.... My paying job involves running a 25 year old 53’ aluminum commercial boat, which the owners just acquired this winter.  Now that it is warm and I have water at the dock, I’ve started a cleaning campaign.  Discovered that while it was superficially clean, there are miles of stingers and frames and equipment and any other spaces that are even moderately difficult to get to that seems to have never been cleaned.  I’m still pulling out handfuls of dirt, junk, screws, wire ends, wrench sockets, washers, etc.  Also discovered that the surveyor wasn’t worth nuthin’, as there is a plate stbd side laz bilge that appears to have warts, and is almost pitted through in spots.   That one is wide open and easily accessible, but not mentioned in the writeup and not indicated in the audioguage  report

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43 minutes ago, NaClH20 said:

Boy wouldn’t I love to know how you got the bilge that clean.... My paying job involves running a 25 year old 53’ aluminum commercial boat, which the owners just acquired this winter.  Now that it is warm and I have water at the dock, I’ve started a cleaning campaign.  Discovered that while it was superficially clean, there are miles of stingers and frames and equipment and any other spaces that are even moderately difficult to get to that seems to have never been cleaned.  I’m still pulling out handfuls of dirt, junk, screws, wire ends, wrench sockets, washers, etc.  Also discovered that the surveyor wasn’t worth nuthin’, as there is a plate stbd side laz bilge that appears to have warts, and is almost pitted through in spots.   That one is wide open and easily accessible, but not mentioned in the writeup and not indicated in the audioguage  report

Full disclosure: I welded NEW plates down the center of the bilge to cover the lead ballast.  

The original metal (not quite as shinny as the center plates) was cleaned up with a sanding wheel.

Steve

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Having recently done this job on a similar boat, you should consider a wet vac disposable, so use an old one or a cheap one.

Disposible diapers are your friend, use them to wipe the bilges down first, they get am amazing amount of crap and stale water out of there before you use the pressure washer.

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9 hours ago, Panope said:

Sounds like you have plenty of enthusiasm for the project, student driver.  It will be worth the effort.

I've got a 44 year old aluminum boat. Been in the family since new.

A few years ago I gutted/cleaned the bilges and rebuilt the cabin sole with huge access hatches everywhere - highly recommended.

uA0LV2o.jpg

 

mwJdite.jpg

 

Wow. Great job Panope.

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55 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Having recently done this job on a similar boat, you should consider a wet vac disposable, so use an old one or a cheap one.

Disposible diapers are your friend, use them to wipe the bilges down first, they get am amazing amount of crap and stale water out of there before you use the pressure washer.

Good tip. I've normally tried to stay well clear of those. ;-)

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Nice boat, you should get lots of good advice here.

Dirty bilges usually look alot worse than they are.  A good approach is to not over think it.  Start simple with mechanical tools, some good carbide scrapers and get a good shop vac, something like a fein.  You will use it alot and they don't make messes and take tons of abuse, plus they are really quiet. Scrape and vacuum out a bay then clean with a simple soap and hot water, dawn and joy dishsoap are good.  You can tape a braided hose into the shop hose to dry out hard to get places.  Of you focus on one Bay at a time it's not so overwhelming.  As above a UT survey would be a great investment.  Out of the water it would probably only take a couple hrs. and you would have documentation down the road.

 

Good luck!

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That's a LOT of boat, which can probably eat as much time and money as you want to throw at her.   At 35yo, and apparently stems-heavy, you will have lots of decisions to make about gear, but a thorough cleanout sounds like a good start.

I'd want to inspect the rig very thoroughly before taking her out.  Losing a mast of that size would be horribly expensive.

How do you intended to use the boat?

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Wow, thanks for sharing that Two. What a well thought out world cruiser. 
SD, sometimes comments here, including mine, can take on a negative tone. I suspect most of us would be thrilled to have you return her to seaworthy status.

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Was there a question or do you just have giant Al boat now?  Seems like replacing the 1980's electronics will be most straightforward task just depends on your budget/expectations. I hope the rigging is not original.  Could be fine until it's not.   As far as your survey with regards to the hull, given Al hulls typically had a lot of bog/fairing on them, it is possible that there are areas that have seen more significant decay than the survey would indicate.  Random washers etc.may not be the big issue.  Hidden original build issues may haunt you.

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8 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Having recently done this job on a similar boat, you should consider a wet vac disposable, so use an old one or a cheap one.

Disposible diapers are your friend, use them to wipe the bilges down first, they get am amazing amount of crap and stale water out of there before you use the pressure washer.

Ha ha, yeah, I basically destroyed my $90 Ryobi wet/dry vac at the haulout. The bilges under the engine were pretty clean, but I wanted them spotless. Lots of degreaser then pressure wash (not full blast, but more than a hose) with the vac hose stuck in the sump to ensure the bilge pump didn't cut in and pump the waste water onto the hard.

Stupid forgot that the vac drum was more than half full of wood dust & shavings. Ooops. The vac survived but I doubt it's long for this world. Fortunately Bunnings has more.

But hey, the bilges under the engine are pristine now what with all the dust, odd dropped screws etc etc sucked out.

FKT

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So yesterday i used a 1.2k portable power washer with a wide pattern and just used water on the teak.  Lot’s of dirt gone.  Need to clean again with a mild detergent and then not sure what I am meant to do, if anything to the deck.

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Next step is to patch up the bottom paint.  The surveyor indicated that the epoxy layer is intact and good quality.  The problem is that the bottom paint was applied when the epoxy layer was too dry.  I bought some trilux 33 and sandpaper.  Have been advised that i need to rough up the epixy gently and then apply the bottom paint.  This is a band aid tactic as I plan to haul her in Sept for work which will include the bottom. 
 

BTW, I’d a bit of a dead head so my daughter suggested Ripple as a name.  I’ve asked a graphic artist for a quote.  Would love to have a logo like the dancing bears or a water/ripple.  
 

here are some shots of the bottom

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Regarding the bilge, i may need to wait for the batteries to be installed as it’s not clever for me to be below decks while work is being done. 

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Thank you all for the encouraging and invaluable comments.  Am now about to drive 160 miles home and have been posting from my car/iphone.  
 

Will respond to each of you tomorrow when I have a computer to use. 
 

Plan to be back on Monday and will be in the yard all week with a plan to splash once the batteries are in but not necessarily after all the plumbing is done   Need to see how the engine runs and other critical systems like the bilge pumps, chargers, inverters etc  

 

thanks again. 

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On 6/19/2020 at 10:11 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

Great looking boat, that keel looks ahead of her time. Who built her, PJ? Luke?

She needs to be tidied, but I'm guessing you got a banging deal on a great boat. Just wait until you price a new set of 3Di's. 

With a bow thruster she should be pretty easy to handle around the dock.

Congratulations!!!!!

She was built in South Africa by Cenmarine.  
 

I need to look into adding a bow thruster.  

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On 6/19/2020 at 10:33 AM, Panope said:

Sounds like you have plenty of enthusiasm for the project, student driver.  It will be worth the effort.

I've got a 44 year old aluminum boat. Been in the family since new.

A few years ago I gutted/cleaned the bilges and rebuilt the cabin sole with huge access hatches everywhere - highly recommended.

uA0LV2o.jpg

 

mwJdite.jpg

 

That boat is beautiful and reflects a huge amount of work, I presume. Unfortunately, the floor structure and plumbing and centerboard box make much of the bilge far ftom reach and hard to access 

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Didn't I see a thruster tunnel already in place in your pics?

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On 6/19/2020 at 2:48 PM, steele said:

Decluttering and cleaning is tedious and time intensive, but not technically difficult. The problem may be the multiple complex systems in place on such a large boat. Based on your pics and the survey much of it is going to have to come out to confirm the integrity of the hull, then you get into the mission creep of replacing stuff while it is out anyway. Since some of it is decades old that may be a good thing, but as you have mentioned not inexpensive. 

A final thought, most of the time advice is worth what you paid for, but anything contributed by Panope is pure gold. His ingenuity and craftsmanship is unmatched.

Unloading inventory, touching up the bottom and cleaning inside and out are the current priorities for me while the yard finishes the battery replacement. 

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4 minutes ago, IStream said:

Didn't I see a thruster tunnel already in place in your pics?

My boat has blue bottom paint.  The green bottom with the modern keel and thruster are an Oyster.  My bad. 

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4 minutes ago, IStream said:

Didn't I see a thruster tunnel already in place in your pics?

That's what I thought, post #2.

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On 6/20/2020 at 2:48 AM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Ha ha, yeah, I basically destroyed my $90 Ryobi wet/dry vac at the haulout. The bilges under the engine were pretty clean, but I wanted them spotless. Lots of degreaser then pressure wash (not full blast, but more than a hose) with the vac hose stuck in the sump to ensure the bilge pump didn't cut in and pump the waste water onto the hard.

Stupid forgot that the vac drum was more than half full of wood dust & shavings. Ooops. The vac survived but I doubt it's long for this world. Fortunately Bunnings has more.

But hey, the bilges under the engine are pristine now what with all the dust, odd dropped screws etc etc sucked out.

FKT

That’s kind of my plan, minus the wood chips.  My ryobi cost $115 so I’m sure it’ll last forever (laughing.).  They claim it has 5.5HP. 

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On 6/19/2020 at 8:24 PM, TwoLegged said:

That's a LOT of boat, which can probably eat as much time and money as you want to throw at her.   At 35yo, and apparently stems-heavy, you will have lots of decisions to make about gear, but a thorough cleanout sounds like a good start.

I'd want to inspect the rig very thoroughly before taking her out.  Losing a mast of that size would be horribly expensive.

How do you intended to use the boat?

The standing rigging is about 8 years old.  Plan to replace it in the fall haul-out.  
 

Plan to sail out of my YC on Gardiner’s Bay (South Fork of E-LI.). Newport, Cape Cod, Nantucket and possibly Maine.  
 

After a substantial refit and some miles under the keel, I’d like to take her below 22 Lat for a few seasons.  In 5-10 years, Panama Canal and westward.

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On 6/19/2020 at 10:28 PM, steele said:

Wow, thanks for sharing that Two. What a well thought out world cruiser. 
SD, sometimes comments here, including mine, can take on a negative tone. I suspect most of us would be thrilled to have you return her to seaworthy status.

Thanks.  That’s the plan. Hope I’m up for the task.  It’s really hard to appreciate the complexity unless or until you find yourself facing a task like mine.  I wanted the challenge and need to learn what’s in every nook and how every system works.  
 

What bends my mind is the very detailed recollection the former owner has regarding the location of specific spare parts and tools.  Amazing.  Hope I become that sharpe by his age.  

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On 6/19/2020 at 2:58 PM, Zonker said:

Cleaning the bilge is important. Aluminum doesn't like standing water or staying wet with salt water in the bilges.  But I'd say don't panic over a s.s. fastener in the bilge but be aware the copper (or bronze alloys with copper in them) is not good. A clean dry aluminum boat will last. Aluminum does worst in tropical conditions with high moisture. Also beware of poultice corrosion where water is trapped between XX and the aluminum.

Don't throw away spares or odd things you cannot understand. They probably have a use somewhere aboard.

The former owner was telling me about an instrument which you attach to exposed aluminum and the other end goes in the water.  I need to find it and learn how to use it.  

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36 minutes ago, Student_Driver said:

After a substantial refit and some miles under the keel, I’d like to take her below 22 Lat for a few seasons.  In 5-10 years, Panama Canal and westward.

That boat has long legs.  Good to hear that you plan to use them when you're ready.

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1 hour ago, Student_Driver said:

Thanks.  That’s the plan. Hope I’m up for the task.  It’s really hard to appreciate the complexity unless or until you find yourself facing a task like mine.  I wanted the challenge and need to learn what’s in every nook and how every system works. 

Try building one from scratch. You have to figure out all those systems you need and then install them.

My hull is a bigger sister ship to SV PANOPE except in steel not aluminium. Not as big as yours though. Thank God for that, it'd still be in the shed.

FKT

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Very nice,

A real diamond in the rough.  

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16 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

The former owner was telling me about an instrument which you attach to exposed aluminum and the other end goes in the water

One of these is the permanently installed type; there are also portable ones.

https://www.sterling-power-usa.com/yachtcorrosionmeter.aspx

https://westcoastboatzincs.com/products/marine-digital-corrosion-test-meter-standard

https://www.boatcorrosion.com/index.html

What you are looking for is the Silver/Silver chloride reference cell that is immersed.

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Wow. 50,000 lbs displacement, that's a wave crusher. Bet she's a soft ride asea. 

For comparison, a Hinckley SW-51/52, no lightweight, is 40,000 lbs. My 48'er is 30,000. A Taylor 49 spirit of tradition is 17,000. 

You got a lot of beautiful boat there.

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Any recommendations for a rigger and or sail maker in the Somerset-Newport area?  Am going to call Thurson today. 

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When cleaning and degreasing the bilge do not be tempted to use a household solvent like Simple Green. That's been known to eat aluminum aircraft skin, although there is an aircraft approved Simple Green formula you can buy at an aviation supply store.

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Ugh.  I am so glad you said that!  I did buy some. 

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Welcome. I have a 47ft Aluminium pilothouse yacht which is 22 years old. Like every construction method, you have started a journey that never ends...

Our biggest issue while living aboard is condensation, too cold for hatches to be open.

Your boat looks beautiful.

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She floats!  Congratulations, that looks like a great boat.  Good luck with the projects.

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On ‎6‎/‎19‎/‎2020 at 11:54 AM, Student_Driver said:

Thank for the feedback. There was a survey of the hull.  Corrosion was measured to be less than 8%.  Hull is massively overbuilt but still cleaning all of the nooks and crannies will be a knuckle bashing ordeal.   
 

Here’s an excerpt:  Complete and careful inspection was made of all available bilge spaces. The bilges are painted aluminum with a good portion of the coatings peeling. There is some oxidation to the aluminum hull plate vat the intersect to frames. Several ultra-sonic readings were taken from the inside of the vessel, using the as built plans as the base line for the original thickness. We found the vessel to have an overall deterioration of less than 8%. These readings were randomly taken in areas of the bilge accessible without removal of interferences. Due to the fairing and epoxy coating readings cannot be taken in a systematic grid from the outside without removal the fairing compound and epoxy coating. 

 

 

We do it at the yard all the time (steel ships) grinding on spots for thickness mesurement.

What they did, is the minimum, no removal and only on accessible places. If I was selling, I would make sure all the bad spots are made unaccessible

I think on some places a cracktest on weldings (bow, around the keel), ... is also a smart thing to do.

14 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Ugh.  I am so glad you said that!  I did buy some. 

My next comment, make sure the cleaner you use, is good for aluminium.

But most product commercial ships use, is good. Because the floorboards in enginerooms are made of aluminium. And in most cases, it is a good degreaser without damage to the paint (where paint is good)

 

Good luck with the project.

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nice boat indeed! Congrats!

Did you splash without taking care of the bottom? It seems the black spots are visible on the water line.

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Sails went up today.  
 

Another Sailor: i put some black triton 33 over the missing bottom paint.  A bit sloppy but the local marine chandlers did not have blue.  Boat will get a new bottom this fall. 

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Speaking as someone with a plastic 50'er who never thought he'd have a boat that big, you're in for a very expensive but very satisfying journey. Take her out and run her hard every chance you get. Nothing gets the blood pumping like 40,000 lbs doing 10+ knots and still straining at the bit. 

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True. $$ aré hemorrhaging fast.  Batteries, dinghy/engine, inverter/charger etc.  Let’s just say that the $25K I have to spend on the charter to buy program (donated boat), is almost done and the list of improvements is large. 
 

I’ve asked for pricing on an in-boom furling main, roller furler and new staysail. Boat will need a new bottom and new standing rigging in the fall. She needs repairs or replacement for one fuel tank, new plumbing, new soft goods, new instruments and nav gear.   That’s the start of the list.  

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Does anyone have a strong recommendation for inboom furler?  I’d like to have an electric system for raising the halyard/main from the cockpit.  Can either be a separate capstan winch or integrated.  

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Dude, take my advice and forget the in-boom for now. You've got a lot of potentially large surprise expenses ahead of you, no need to add a planned large expense that you could easily pull the trigger on a few years down the road once you've got the boat dialed in. 

For shorthanded sail handling, focus on getting rid of friction everywhere you can. Start with the sheaves and axles at the masthead. Make sure the turning blocks at the base of the mast are nice, big, rolling bearing units. If you don't have a Tides track or Harken Battcar or equivalent system for your main, do that. Add a stackpack. Once all that stuff is in place, an electric halyard winch combined with a good autopilot (which you'll want anyway) will cover all your mainsail handling needs, both up and down.

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13 hours ago, IStream said:

Speaking as someone with a plastic 50'er who never thought he'd have a boat that big, you're in for a very expensive but very satisfying journey. 

Are there pics on a thread we can see? :)

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She has an Antal track, fully battened main and bat-cars with low friction sleeves.  Main halyard on a block with 2:1.  There are five winches on the mast.  All manual.  
 

the in boom is a low priority since the main is nearly new.   Genoa is in good condition with out four seasons of use. The luff is a bit damaged (and repaired) which may mean that the Reckman manual furler track/foil needs repair or replacement.  

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Sounds like she's reasonably well set up already. Any way you can run the main halyard back to the cockpit? In addition to being a lot more convenient, it would make it possible to put an electric winch in. 

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3 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

She has an Antal track, fully battened main and bat-cars with low friction sleeves.  Main halyard on a block with 2:1.  There are five winches on the mast.  All manual.  
 

the in boom is a low priority since the main is nearly new.   Genoa is in good condition with out four seasons of use. The luff is a bit damaged (and repaired) which may mean that the Reckman manual furler track/foil needs repair or replacement.  

Antal is nice stuff,

Then think of all the good healthy exercise you'll get sailing...:)

Being able to raise or lower the main from the cockpit would be a nice thing.

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3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:
17 hours ago, IStream said:

Speaking as someone with a plastic 50'er who never thought he'd have a boat that big, you're in for a very expensive but very satisfying journey. 

Are there pics on a thread we can see?

I haven't put up a thread on her but at the risk of polluting this thread, here are some pics I've posted over the years. 

large.IMG_20180808_094750.jpg.c130e3daec84766dd37b833ae975c49b.jpglarge.IMG_20170819_123017.jpg.da1b1c60708e5781e404316153bcfb3c.jpglarge.IMG_20170823_112049.jpg.74043e214f4ed0f2e568a6b03a24564d.jpglarge.IMG_20170703_150943.jpg.a1b585d0a5f8555897f9356b3b44e796.jpglarge.keelAft.jpg.d24c8576183674588dba0b42e9715ba2.jpggallery_101238_1279_32926.jpg

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I remember the top photo from when it was first posted, just beautiful.There is nothing like kids on a boat. We loved sailing with ours but they're grown and busy. I wish they'd get busier. My biological is ticking and I want grandchildren NOW!

Great boat! Thanks. 

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Thanks. That's my baby girl (now 11)  hanging out in the orange shade of the asymmetrical spinnaker. She's the only one of the kids still enthusiastic about being trapped on the boat with Mom and Dad. I'm hoping to use the COVID situation to get everyone back out soon since there's not a hell of a lot else they can do.

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Made it to Newport shipyard.  We even sailed a bit in Narragansett down from Somerset  

The Bimini needs to be done again.  My second effort was as pathetic and rushed as the first attempt   Third attempt  will be the one  

 

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On 6/25/2020 at 11:10 PM, Student_Driver said:

 

CE54CCB8-9EB7-40BA-8CA6-01A983F66433.jpeg

That sheerline from that angle is about as close to perfection as it gets.

I wouldn't like to handle the loads on such a big boat, or to take on the financial loads.  I'd even be frightened by the length of the to-do list just to keep her running, never mind the list to get her commissioned. But I do like other people maintaining such fine eye candy

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Docking her for the first time with two young girls helping on the lines had my pucker factor high.  There’s a lot of work to do but I’m in love. 

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Seeing this look on my daughter’s face, priceless. 

890CE92F-0FB9-4EA1-B51C-4797BD8A9C98.jpeg

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23 hours ago, IStream said:

Thanks. That's my baby girl (now 11)  hanging out in the orange shade of the asymmetrical spinnaker. She's the only one of the kids still enthusiastic about being trapped on the boat with Mom and Dad. I'm hoping to use the COVID situation to get everyone back out soon since there's not a hell of a lot else they can do.

It’s all about family.  When they sail, life is good. 

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Spent last night and tonight at Newport Shipyards.  Such a phenomenal place to visit.   So many great boats have passed through there. Belle’s is great and the staff are great.  Thinking of sailing to the vineyard, block and then my yc on e-lis for the 4th. Then back to Newport for repairs.  The list is long.   Plumbing, leaking tanks, refrigerator maintenance (grunert with holding plates), Instruments, inverter etc

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Newport is not the cheapest place to get service. Skilled labor rates in Maine are 30% cheaper, hell  its probably cheaper in Jamestown or Middletown. 

have you ever been to P-Town by boat? Anchor across from town at the National Seashore in a Sou'wester. One of the most beautiful places in America. 

Town is fun, but for exercise rent bikes and do the bikes paths north of town.  There is a bike shop at the head of the docks and turn right. 

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Will have to sail to p-town

 

On Block

 

 

6C953C71-F8F7-445F-A24D-FA7F46D1FF68.jpeg

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Beautiful!

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Just finished a week cruise with my daughter and her friend. Been cataloging necessary and desirable repairs and upgrades. Here’s the summary list. 

 
She needs urgently: grunnert refrigerator maintenance (she has the R134a in inventory ), fix a broken water pipe, replace charter/inverter/battery monitor. fix or replace Raritan Phi2 head (aft)
 
This fall she needs to have all of the plumbing and pipes replaced, fix leaks in both fuel and holding tanks, bottom paint, all new electronics (B&G instrumentals originals from 84), inspect or replace standing rigging, staysail roller reefing install. Running rigging improvements and refurbish. Dodger repair, new cockpit enclosure for cold/wet weather sailing
 
Items I am considering but need more info:
 
Small gen set
Repair or replace watermaker
A/c for master stateroom
Replace certain high voltage wires
Upgrade or improve existing electric control, circuits and wiring. 
Improve/repair or replace aging formica countertops and galley and bathroom surfaces, lighting upgrades, entertainment upgrade, cell phone booster (boat hull blocks reception), sinks and faucets replacement. 
 
 

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On the inverter/charger side i’ve had two shops recommend victron.  I’d love feedback on the battery monitor.  Want to be able to see amps/volts etc on my ipad/iphone etc. 
 

The refrigerator requires some specialization and that may limit who i can use. 
 

i’ve called or visited a dozen yards. A few have come on board to look but no one has sent me a proposal. It’s like pulling teeth. Everyone seems swamped. 
 

Most responsive have been the plumbing specialist in Newport.  May be back in Newport on Monday unless someone else closer to home steps up with a proposal and timeline.   

 

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I can't speak to the Victron monitor as I don't own one but I strongly suggest you max out the solar potential of the boat before you even think about a genset. If you look at the photos of my boat upthread, you'll see that I've got 870W of solar on my hard dodger and it's fantastic. Silent, relatively low cost, virtually maintenance free...Upgrades don't get much better. In fact, I'm a firm believer that you can never have too much solar. Excess capacity overcomes shading issues, extends your season into the cloudier/shorter days of fall, winter, and spring, lightens the load on your alternator when underway, and if you have a massive excess of power it can always be used to heat water.

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I'm a big fan of the MasterVolt Mass Combi Inverter-Charger.  I don;t have it wired into my backbone so it doesn't get out on the wireless.

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47 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

Leak in holding tank doesn't sound like the kind of job to wait...

To get to it means ripping out a ton of tubes, equipment and possibly permanently fixtures.  Don’t want her on the hard for the summer. Been using onshore facilities when/where possible.   I’d like to do all the plumbing at once and it’s a very big job. 

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4 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

On the inverter/charger side i’ve had two shops recommend victron.  I’d love feedback on the battery monitor.  Want to be able to see amps/volts etc on my ipad/iphone etc. 
 

The refrigerator requires some specialization and that may limit who i can use. 
 

i’ve called or visited a dozen yards. A few have come on board to look but no one has sent me a proposal. It’s like pulling teeth. Everyone seems swamped. 
 

Most responsive have been the plumbing specialist in Newport.  May be back in Newport on Monday unless someone else closer to home steps up with a proposal and timeline.   

 

Victron is a decent battery monitor, but I have to say that the Balmar battery monitor is well worth the $300 or so.  It learns your batteries over time and gives you an accurate state of charge without having to constantly recalibrat