Sign in to follow this  
keenbean

Moth or Musto Skiff

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

I have a laser but i'm looking to get one of the above as well. I will always keep a laser on the side!

Just wondered if anyone knows what the easier boat to get to grips with is? Laser sailors seem to transition pretty well into moths but I don't really know how they go with boats like a musto skiff.

Any thoughts are much appreciated.

Happy sailing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi. you'd love both. 
- Very good laser sailor transition very well to moths, average sailors do not necessarily transion that well (average skiff sailors transition better normally to moths than average laser sailors in my experience)

- Musto is hard to transition to for everybody, unless you are a competent skiff helm. you are almost always without a third hand you would need, so you need to be really precise with the steering.

Go with the moth if you want the most rewarding sailing experience, go with the Musto if you privilege time on the water over boat tinkering (moth requires some). then of course local fleet matters, especially to help you through the transition.

have fun!

mic

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bruce Keen, Richard Stenhouse and Andy Tarboton are 3 of the skiff guys I know who were Laser sailors, Bruce and Richard have won a large percentage of all skiff worlds, both moved across quite late in life so I would say that is  the logical choice, also far kinder on the wallet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave Poston's channel on youtube is a great view of MPS sailing, and it's a hoot to watch.

Moths are massive amount of boatwork - and massive fun. But if time is constrained, Wazsp, UFOs are sturdier and tons of fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

Dave Poston's channel on youtube is a great view of MPS sailing, and it's a hoot to watch.

Moths are massive amount of boatwork - and massive fun. But if time is constrained, Wazsp, UFOs are sturdier and tons of fun.

If time is not constrained could you reveal your secret on how you manage this, or what do you sacrifice to achieve it??

NOT possible in my world!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asking which is easier, Moth or Musto Skiff?  Strange question, both are mind bogglingly hard to learn, and impossible without a fleet to join.

Whatever is closer.  Musto better in chop, Moth better in flat water.  It's a long walk with much broken gear to become competent with either.

Get a cat if you want 'easier', faster too in most cases.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, FishAintBiting said:

If time is not constrained could you reveal your secret on how you manage this, or what do you sacrifice to achieve it??

NOT possible in my world!!!!

It's damn hard. But some things make boatwork easier/more possible. If you have a shed, or live near to the water or the sailing club. If the structure of your day allows you to work on things (for example, if you work from home). If you don't have kids, or your kids enjoy doing boatwork with you. 

Or maybe you inherited a large fortune, or sold your startup, and don't need to work fulltime.

Anyway, I have some advantages when it comes to boatwork so I can do some, but I don't have a Moth -- I would not be able to do all that boatwork, and the rigging/setup takes too much time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two neighbors, one of which had a Musto Skiff for a few years, the other has had moths.   I had the chance to sail the Skiff once and have sailed the moth numerous times.   Both are terrific boats, and both will challenge all but the most advanced sailors.  Here are a few pro's and con's of each.

For the Musto Skiff, the cost of entry and maintenance will certainly be lower.  You don't see them around here (Northeast US) for sale often, but when you do they are in the $7-9K range.  There is nothing particularly exotic about the construction of the boat, so standard repair techniques apply, and from what I saw, it is a pretty robust design.  I only had a chance to sail it once, and it is a handful.  Very little primary stability, its only happy when the boat is loaded up and you are trapezing out on the rack.  Once you are there, it is deceptively fast and really comfortable.  I didn't have a chance to pop the chute, it was too windy on my first and only outing, but that looks like it takes the difficulty and fun factors up by another order of magnitude.  I watched my neighbor power reach under the spinnaker many times, and it is an impressive display.  Speeds in the high teens.   

Moths, while hardly plentiful, are more common in our area, but a decent Mach 2 will cost about twice the Musto Skiff.  It is a much more delicate boat as well, so expect to spend a lot more time, and more funds as well, keeping it in good condition.   As for difficulty, I found getting started to be a bit easier than the Musto Skiff, as it felt very similar to windsurfing and skiff sailing.  But while I found it fairly straightforward to get foiling, mastering tacking and gybing is a very long learning curve.  I also note that I had the benefit of sailing a boat owned by a very capable boat tuner.   I understand that half the battle in a Moth is simply getting it set up correctly.   Most have been modified over the years, and there are a lot of variables to work with.   If you don't have other moth sailors in your area, this makes the learning curve much, much harder. 

I don't know of any Musto Skiff racing in the US, you need to head to Europe to find enough of them to assemble a fleet.   While the fleets are small, you can find Moths to race with in the US, so if racing is your intent, score one for the moth.   Keep in mind that the moth seems to be the current recreational boat of choice for many of the best professional sailors in the world, so if you decide to race, expect a tough fleet!   The Musto will be more forgiving of softer breezes, I think you can be on the trap in about 5 knots of wind, the moth really wants 7-8 knots before you are foiling consistently, particularly if you are learning.  

Either one will give you plenty of high speed fun and allow you to grow your skills envelope.   I decided to go with the UFO, preferring to minimize my boat maintenance and rigging time, and maximize my on the water sailing time.   The Waszp would be a reasonable choice for this path too.   Like you, it sits next to our Laser, which we have no plans to part with.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is it that you want to do, other than spend money?

I bought a MPS over a decade ago and the class in the US could only get a handful of events together as we were too spread out.  Great fun boat though.  I bought it instead of a moth as moths were very early in development at that point.  Moths are now a lot further along in refinement, that refinement has also led to higher prices and the top end of the fleet being worlds away from most mortals.

The boats are obviously fundamentally different ways to go fast on the water.  Coming from a dinghy background I also rationalized it along the lines of wanting the feeling of planing and blasting along instead of foiling.  I'm now fully into kite-foiling and I'll tell you that the feeling of foiling is entirely different than sailing, and fully amazing.

That means it all comes back to the first question: what is it that you want to do?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it easy to take down any ramp, launch in shallows, sail upwind in shallows or tight channel? Those practical questions can make or break for me. I like to be able to rig and launch in 15-20 minutes, so I can sail after work or in a weekend morning (and be back to family and other activities).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this