climenuts

Dinghy Adventure Anarchy

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23 hours ago, climenuts said:

Anyone have some good Dinghy stories while cruising?

Had some sweet Dinghy Adventures on my recent trip to Desolation. Best of which is going through some ~10kt rapids while half cut one afternoon. Videos below :)

https://photos.app.goo.gl/pWPT7bmTUSrqf7vn9

Got to get @willp14335 on this one. He logged over 1,000 miles in our Portland Pudgy over the years from Maine to Australia.

 

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Beauty. I've been itching for a sailing dinghy but I can't justify it when I'm unwilling to also give up the planing capabilities w/an outboard.

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2 hours ago, climenuts said:

Beauty. I've been itching for a sailing dinghy but I can't justify it when I'm unwilling to also give up the planing capabilities w/an outboard.

Yeah, we used the Pudgy as the "kid's car" and a backup for the most part.

We finally sold it a couple of weeks ago to a younger cruising family with a kid who was about the same age as Will when we got the boat. It was kind of a sad moment, but we're happy it's gone to another cruising kid starting his adventures.

http://sailevenstar.com/goodbye-little-friend/

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I met a guy taking a Walker Bay RIB on a 6,000 mile or so trip if that counts, he was doing the whole Great Loop.

I guess I have a ton of adventures over the years that did not start out that way, one memorable trip to town from the Thimble Islands in Long Island Sound involved our crappy inflatable deflating half way to town. It was one of those awful ancient Avon things with the inflatable stern. We covered the last bit to town with me holding the flaccid bow up in the air and my brother trying to keep the ancient Seagull outboard working despite it leaning back at about a 60 degree angle :o We managed to somehow convince someone on shore to rent a couple of kids a wooden rowboat, put the Seagull on it, went back across LIS to explain to our parents why we spent the grocery money on a rowboat and why the dinghy was deflated inside said rowboat :lol:

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Probably the biggest “dinghy” adventure story of them all... (there’s a vid clip at the end of the introduction blog post).

Alain Bombard on his inflatable, L’Heretique, across the Atlantic back in the 1950s - a deliberate voyage undertaken for personal research purposes.  Well before EPIRBs, sat phones, etc.  Hell, even before Instagram and Facebook - he even had to wait to write a book about his adventures until *after* he returned!  :-)

http://mvkazit.blogspot.com/2018/05/alain-bombard.html?m=1

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lol that’s Bligh’s journey in the open tender with the loyalists from the mutiny on the bounty. Dude may not have been the junior officer’s favs, but he navigated an open boat like a boss. 

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Voyage of the 22.5 foot James Caird

 

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14 minutes ago, Miffy said:

lol that’s Bligh’s journey in the open tender with the loyalists from the mutiny on the bounty. Dude may not have been the junior officer’s favs, but he navigated an open boat like a boss. 

That’s what I thought (incredible story, but not really a “dinghy” per se....not to split hairs, Yer Honour..: :-) )

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When I was a kid my buddies and I did overnight cruises with our 7 foot dinghy by taking camping gear to an island. Back before cell phones and cheap VHFs were a thing it seemed like high adventure for 6th graders!

* can you imagine ANY parent in 2020 saying my 12-year-old is out overnight and I have no way to contact him/her until they get home the next day? We had so much more fun back in the day!

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May I suggest reading " ocean crossing Wayfarer" by Frank and Margaret Dye.  I met the late Frank dye some years ago,  his talks were good as Is his book

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Oh and a common form of attracting children into sailing,  is the fictional dozen books in Arthur Ransome's Swallows and Amazon series, "Coot Club" caused  me to move here,  my sailing club is within sight of one of the settings of the book.  All the books are based around sailing. Especially dinghy adventures. ... 

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This is a great thread. Cant think of anything more fun than a dinghy adventure, especially a sailing dinghy adventure. I got the bug early and was sailing my dad's Jester dinghy by about 6. That boat got used so hard while I was around and so many crazy fun adventures were had. It's still going 50 some years later!

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A very good friend of mine is about to fly to Greece on Monday to visit some old friends that he met there 25 years ago, along with his later wife, and with whom he crossed the Atlantic after buying a boat there.  

He grew up dinghy sailing on lakes in Alberta, Canada, and left for the big water as soon as he was old enough.  Now 50, he still owns the 15’ dinghy he bought with funds from his first job as a sailing coach at 16!  The planning for the recent trip to Greece has involved very complicated and stressful logistics, especially due to Covid, airline cancellations, etc etc etc.  The friends there gently pressured him to come after he strongly wanted to cancel due to Covid-related travel complications he’s encountered with an airline so far.  The friends in Greece have been subtly laying on pressure for him to come. Then he told me last night as we had a beer after work this week that he learned entirely by accident yesterday that the airline had previously cancelled his and his daughter’s flight on Monday - so, stressed out because of all the complicated logistics involved in this increasingly stupid-looking Greek trip, he had to book another flight last night...only to have to deal with yet more airline and Visa rewards points nonsense/partial refunds etc on the phone.  What a fucking nightmare!

I’m getting to the punchline.

As we sat there having a drink last night, him trying to sort out the unexpected complications of airline travel in Covid times, he said, “Fuck, I don’t even want to go.  All I *really* want to do is stay here and go sailing on my dinghy...”
 

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There is a forum member on Woodenboat named "WI-Tom" who has done a few, weeks long dingy and camping journeys around the North Channel in Lake Huron (2010) and the Georgian Bay. His first dingy was a Bolger Pirate Racer, which is rowed and sailed a few hundred miles. He later built an Alaska and sailed/rowed the Georgian Bay. The North Channel isn't the big ocean or even the open Great Lakes, but the water is cold and it's remote. This guy has some skills and he's a good writer. 

North Channel thread with good pic is here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?121978-The-North-Channel-by-Sail-and-Oar

His Georgian Bay trip is here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?251443-Return-to-Georgian-Bay-Part-I

Snubs

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On 7/15/2020 at 3:12 PM, climenuts said:

Anyone have some good Dinghy stories while cruising?

Had some sweet Dinghy Adventures on my recent trip to Desolation. Best of which is going through some ~10kt rapids while half cut one afternoon. Videos below :)

https://photos.app.goo.gl/pWPT7bmTUSrqf7vn9

Where in Desolation?  Stuck south of the Cheese Curtain for the foreseeable future and need some vicarious Desolation hits.  Been cruising up there since I was 5 years old.

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3 hours ago, Secret Experiment said:

This fellow sailed (and rowed and dragged) his Mirror dinghy from the UK to the Black Sea, over 4,000 kms. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Unlikely_Voyage_of_Jack_de_Crow

The book's good lock-down reading, by the way.

 

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I love the idea of this voyage.  I just purchased the book - found the cheapskate $9 copy on amazon.com, whereas the .ca Amazon site had it listed for $76!!  WTF.  Also just bought Frank Dye’s classic book mentioned above (“Ocean Crossing Wayfarer”).  I’ve long meant to read that book...but somehow it just seemed too, too crazy, almost fucking impossible to contemplate what he and his wife accomplished in such a small dinghy.  Iceland?!?

I just built a little 8 ft nesting dinghy to help and encourage my 16 year old daughter in her sailing “development” (she wants to coach as a summer job - first “real” job), and in adventuring and travel in general.  I own and sail a rather larger (33’) boat, but I’m coming to realize how much she knows about basic sailing stuff —via dinghy sailing— that I don’t know.  I need to get out more on the new little boat, I’m coming to realize...and I need a new avenue for adventure, I’m coming to realize even more :-)

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Just remembered Violette Dorange - she crossed the English Channel —oh, pardon, La Manche, since it really doesn’t belong to the bloody English :-) — a few years ago in an Optimist.  First time ever, I think (?).  Anyway, first time by a 15 year old!  
 

Vid below about the voyage is in French, and kinda fast, but you can pick up bits if you have some French background - anyway, it’s cool to see that little boat in big seas.  Impressive!!  (She competed in the MiniTransat last year, at 18 years of age. (For her profile/sailing background, see: https://www.minitransat.fr/en/skippers/dorange-violette )

 

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On 7/18/2020 at 2:54 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

When I was a kid my buddies and I did overnight cruises with our 7 foot dinghy by taking camping gear to an island. Back before cell phones and cheap VHFs were a thing it seemed like high adventure for 6th graders!

* can you imagine ANY parent in 2020 saying my 12-year-old is out overnight and I have no way to contact him/her until they get home the next day? We had so much more fun back in the day!

Our kids did that when we were out cruising, though we sent them with a handheld VHF sometimes they still were out of range. No cell phones.

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10 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Our kids did that when we were out cruising, though we sent them with a handheld VHF sometimes they still were out of range. No cell phones.

Good on you - kids need to feel like they are in charge of their own fate sometimes (within reason).  This is one of my objections to the junior sailing system we have, you might get very skilled Opti/420 operators out of it, but general seamanship and self-reliance - maybe not so much.

Speaking of that, my parents at a young age let me sail my Penguin about 5 miles to where the local races were and then back home, which ended up being a bit more adventure than I wanted. First the wind died, then the sun set, then a nasty line of squalls came through, and then the wind died again. I discovered a Penguin will ride through 40+ knot squalls if you drop the centerboard  full down, remove the rudder, and sit in the stern wrapped in the sail. Board down forward and windage aft makes the boat ride dead into the wind B)

* I eventually paddled the boat to the nearest house and called home for a tow

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On 7/18/2020 at 9:16 AM, Russell Brown said:

This is a great thread. Cant think of anything more fun than a dinghy adventure, especially a sailing dinghy adventure. I got the bug early and was sailing my dad's Jester dinghy by about 6. That boat got used so hard while I was around and so many crazy fun adventures were had. It's still going 50 some years later!

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Reading yer dad’s books and am also following the Outrig project. Please pass along our compliments.

BTW we are friends with Ryan and have seen Jzerro, which is a kewl boat

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Went for a 5 day dinghy adventure 9n my Laser 2 about a month ago, from Terrace Bay to the Slate Islands, not anything crazy but it was super fun!

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18 hours ago, zenmasterfred said:

Where in Desolation?  Stuck south of the Cheese Curtain for the foreseeable future and need some vicarious Desolation hits.  Been cruising up there since I was 5 years old.

Looks like the lagoon at Squirrel Cove.

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36 minutes ago, climenuts said:

It's the lagoon in Von Donop Inlet.

Been by it many times, never in. Thanks for the trip.

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You need to be able to do 8 knots to get in/out. Slack lasts like 10 minutes. A couple with a torqueedo got stuck in there while I was around. Had to tow them out.

 

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Been up there many times too, wasn't sure if it was Von Donop or Squirrel, either way I can't get there from here.  It is pretty spectacular when the tide is low and you see the rocks and distance up to the lagoon.

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Hang on a sec.  I just realized that without the huge ‘murican contingent at Desolation this summer, with no Seattle Yacht Club brass on their massive power boats and half the Puget Sound population in tow, does that mean it’ll be overrun even more this year with hordes of Canadian monkeys instead?

(My best time ever there was late April during a nice warm spell, and literally no one there.)

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My 3 year old son and I had a fun time last night with some dinghy hours. We biked to the marina to spend the night and took the dinghy out for a sail cruise after dinner. A seal followed us, we checked on our favorite boat graphics (he likes boats with pictures of animals) and we just had fun in the wind.  After breakfast we did a similar rowing cruise.  When we got home today he told my wife that he wanted to do it all again tonight.

I do need to learn how to depower this boat. There is no vang to bend the (stiff) mast and flatten the main.  The boat wants the jib up to point, but that leaves it overpowered in over 10 knots (it doesn’t help that he likes to sit on the low side to play in the water).  In gusts I was using the small jib and flogging the main.  Our dinghy is a Gig Harbor Navigator 10.

Downwind you can feel when you’ve hit hull speed because the flat rudder starts to hum. It’s always tempting to run flat out the length of the marina, but it takes us 30 or 45 minutes to short track back to our end of it. 

I look forward to some sail camping with him on this boat in fun settings, and later letting him and his sister do it on their own. 

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21 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Hang on a sec.  I just realized that without the huge ‘murican contingent at Desolation this summer, with no Seattle Yacht Club brass on their massive power boats and half the Puget Sound population in tow, does that mean it’ll be overrun even more this year with hordes of Canadian monkeys instead?

(My best time ever there was late April during a nice warm spell, and literally no one there.)

It was my first time up there so I can't really comment too much on the business. Seemed like standard Gulf Islands/Sunshine Coast busyness levels but others were saying it was much less busy than normal.

Still had some big penis boats but I didn't see any monsters past ~60ft or so.

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I'm glad to see this thread.  I have plans for a Caravelle that were given to me.

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And sometime in the next few years I'mma gonna build that thing, take it up to Puget Sound, start in Olympia and sail/row the water trail to Port Townsend.

 

 

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Ok, who rows? Who uses a trolling motor?  Who has a boom tent so you can sleep in the boat?  I wanna see!

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11 hours ago, Alan H said:

Ok, who rows? Who uses a trolling motor?  Who has a boom tent so you can sleep in the boat?  I wanna see!

Not my boat, but I met them in the North Channel of Lake Huron in 2017. The boat is an i550 (Hot Canary) that was built by the Goegeon brothers. They later sold it to a couple from Michigan who re-named her Vivacious, made a few changes and then toured the North Channel.

https://www.epoxyworks.com/index.php/vivacious/

I first saw them (the couple) sailing in the Whalesback channel in 2017. I was running west in my 4 ktsb, and they were tacking upwind, to the NE, and moving fast. "Looks like an i550," I thought. "I just love the i550." And I presumed they must be locals or staying nearby, because who would cruise on an i550? I've looked at the plans and thought about building one for cruising but I rejected the possibility.

A few days later I am anchored in the south harbor of S. Benjamin Island and they sail in and anchor. We rafted up later and talked. It was their first trip to the NC. They had paper charts and a handheld gps. They had a boom tent and they slept and cooked on the boat. Cruising on the i550 looked more like camping on a boat than cruising, and they had to pack all their gear in dry bags. But they were having a blast. I later watched them row across the harbor using long oars, and the boat moved briskly. I think the couple later sold the i550. 

Some years I see the CanAm Dingy Cruising Association in the NC. They appear to mostly camp-cruise, but I have never been anchored near them so we have never talked. It's an ideal place for dingy cruising provided you don't try to argue with the weather. 

Snubs

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20 hours ago, Alan H said:

Ok, who rows? Who uses a trolling motor?  Who has a boom tent so you can sleep in the boat?  I wanna see!

I recall coming across this on the web some years back - a very cool account by a guy who rowed and sailed (no engine) a Don Kurylko-designed 17-foot “Alaska” from Anacortes, WA to Petersburg, AK.  Not really a dinghy, but...  (Plans here:  https://www.duckworks.com/product-p/dk-alaska-id.htm)

There used to be more pics on Don’s site of the boat with his boom tent, the man, and the big white Samoyed dog (but I believe Don retired and went off sailing; no more website).  When I saw those pics back then, I instantly wanted one :-).  Very cool (but probably pricey) boat to build.  Hell of a trip...maybe one day, when I’m old and done with the comfort and ease of bigger boats :-).  
 

(Hmm, but I just downloaded the free study plans at the link above, tossing around ideas for “the next boat/the next voyage” :-)  That said, it seems like an Angus Sailing Row Cruiser may be a better choice...)

 

 

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An i550 is a little beyond, dinghy cruising, but wow...would be fun!

 

Dinghy cruising pretty much means all your kit is in a dry bag, most of the time.

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Not a dinghy, but it is hypalon and has oars. And it is in rapids. And it was adventurous.

 

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I wasn't "cruising"  but there was an unexpected breeze yesterday so rather than take out the mothership, I launched the Dyer Dhow.

I found this tiny trailer on Craigslist a couple years ago. I think it was for a Pintail or something. It's not highway-worthy but it's perfect to run the Dyer down the street to the beach. I sailed about 3 miles in about 2 hours which isn't all that fast, I'll admit.

There is a sunken island out in the river called ironically, High Island. I've grazed the top with the rudders of my Hobie 16 so I figured I could easily clear it with the Dyer. Ha, sucker! The tide was way out.

I sailed onto the island upwind, so I was heeled over and the rudder wasn't at its full depth. There was a good breeze and I was "in the groove" and just enjoying myself. I ran up on the shoal, peeked under the sail and noticed that the island was nearly exposed! Waves were breaking on the high spot. I managed to turn downwind but of course now the boat is standing straight up so the rudder is at full depth and it's not adjustable. Puffs of wind kept scooting me ahead, dragging the rudder.

After about 50 feet, I finally sailed off and enjoyed the sweetest run in that little boat. When I got into the creek the wind just died. I was like the kid when the quarter runs out on the electric pony ride in front of the grocery store. "Wheee... awww... shit. :( "  I had to row 1/3 mile but that's ok.  The faintest breath of a breeze ghosted me back onto the beach.

There's something magical about silently ghosting along in a light breeze in these Chesapeake creeks. It's different than canoeing or kayaking because it's utterly silent with none of the splashing noises. You sneak up on birds and turtles. Eagles, osprey and red tail hawks wheel overhead.  Great blue heron make those indignant dinosaur croaks as they fly away. Little green heron watch you suspiciously with baleful eyes. I watched a large, brown water snake cross my stern. As I broke down the boat in the fading light, the bats came out. I recently had a friend come over who has a "bat detector" that plugs into your smartphone. It identified the bats in my neighborhood as Large Brown bats and Eastern Red bats.

This is probably the most fun you can have on a work day in the middle of the week.

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On 7/16/2020 at 6:23 PM, climenuts said:

Beauty. I've been itching for a sailing dinghy but I can't justify it when I'm unwilling to also give up the planing capabilities w/an outboard.

 

 

 

 

 

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Just got a copy of the classic book, “Ocean Crossing Wayfarer”, by Frank Dye, about he and his wife Margaret’s cruising over the decades in their 16’ Wayfarer.  Absolutely un-fucking-believable dinghy cruising stories - and way “back in the day”, in the 1960s and ‘70s.  I’d never really heard of their “exploits” before - or them, since they’re apparently extremely modest people who happened to have  done some incredible feats of seamanship.  That’s the reason, it seems, that their little 16’ Wayfarer is in the UK National Maritime Museum.  Wow!

Best pic in the book is Frank Dye eating a cold roast chicken in the cockpit en route from Scotland to Iceland...but they also had that little boat well-kitted out with a basic one burner stove and pot for tea, etc. for more modest cruises.

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Here's a fun one. My wife didn't think so, but I did.

I thought it was Grizzly bears I needed to worry about, but it was black flies and water drops on my camera that were the problem.

 

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2 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Just got a copy of the classic book, “Ocean Crossing Wayfarer”, by Frank Dye, about he and his wife Margaret’s cruising over the decades in their 16’ Wayfarer.  Absolutely un-fucking-believable dinghy cruising stories - and way “back in the day”, in the 1960s and ‘70s.  I’d never really heard of their “exploits” before - or them, since they’re apparently extremely modest people who happened to have  done some incredible feats of seamanship.  That’s the reason, it seems, that their little 16’ Wayfarer is in the UK National Maritime Museum.  Wow!

Best pic in the book is Frank Dye eating a cold roast chicken in the cockpit en route from Scotland to Iceland...but they also had that little boat well-kitted out with a basic one burner stove and pot for tea, etc. for more modest cruises.

Just found this - absolutely classic!  A must-watch dinghy adventure (huge understatement) film.  Frank Dye’s “A Summer Cruise” - shot on film in 1964.  Tough sailors!!!  Check out the huge gale...en route to Norway...

 

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4 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Just found this - absolutely classic!  A must-watch dinghy adventure (huge understatement) film.  Frank Dye’s “A Summer Cruise” - shot on film in 1964.  Tough sailors!!!  Check out the huge gale...en route to Norway...

Four minutes into the video and already I know this much:

  • he carried a couple of gallons of motor oil to "pour on troubled waters"
  • he considered the 700 mile drive to launch the dinghy "one of the most hazardous parts of the journey"
  • he is nuts!

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28 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

Four minutes into the video and already I know this much:

  • he carried a couple of gallons of motor oil to "pour on troubled waters"
  • he considered the 700 mile drive to launch the dinghy "one of the most hazardous parts of the journey"
  • he is nuts!

Was .. Frank, Died 2010, aged 82.

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17 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

Four minutes into the video and already I know this much:

  • he is nuts!

No, an altogether much more complex picture of the man emerges here (Guardian newspaper profile of Frank Dye and one his stalwart crew, Bill Brockbank.)  Dye was extremely motivated to challenge himself, and prepared meticulously, it seems, to be able to take very calculated risks.

“Bill Brockbank was 21 then, a gifted racing sailor, and when I meet him in the lush surroundings of his sailing club near Waltham Abbey 50 years after the voyage he is still tall and lean, with closely cropped grey-white hair and a neatly trimmed beard. In his account, Dye was anything but reckless: he was a meticulous planner with a highly developed desire to push himself – George Mallory in a dinghy. "I think Frank climbed mountains," says Brockbank. "They were just horizontal mountains. He was certainly doing what mountain climbers do, asking: 'What's the challenge; how can I go about it?' He was just doing it in a different medium.

“So he introduced himself to Dye, telling him: "I'm your new crew."

Dye was sceptical: "No," he said, "you're not."

Brockbank could not shake the idea off, and Dye couldn't shake Brockbank. The young student travelled regularly from his home in Liverpool to Norfolk, where Dye ran a family Ford dealership. Eventually Frank offered the Liverpudlian a trial cruise across the stormy Wash at night. During the exercise, Frank explained the principles of extreme sailing he had built up. No detail, Brockbank learned, was too small, no contingency too unlikely for Dye's problem-solving mind to examine, plan for and test.

A lifelong principle was that he should never call for help: no one should have to risk their life to save him from trouble he had got into voluntarily. So his radio could only receive and was not able to transmit a distress signal. He refused to take anyone who was married in case they were lost, and both crew had to be able to do everything because their partner might be unconscious or dead. His medical kit included enough morphine to knock out a horse, as there was always a chance he'd need to amputate a limb at sea. Before setting out he trawled over all the relevant information he could find: he read 35 years' of weather reports and calculated the likelihood of gales, researched seasonal sea temperatures and worked out survival times. He worked his way round the boat, thinking how each part could break and the best way to fix it.”

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Google "the adventures of Ginny and Steve".  He spoke at one of our NW Multihull Club meetings.  Not sure it qualifies as a dingy but it was an open boat.   Sailing to & from and exploring Amazonia.  His first was solo in 1993 in a 12’ open boat from Montana to the rivers of South America and back to Florida!  Yeah, you read that right.  He wrote a book:  Three Years on a 12’ Boat, you’ll find it on Amazon.  But he spent most of the evening talking about his big trip, 2009-14.  He and his wife spent 5 years sailing a 21 foot, 7 inch draft lee boarder from; Florida to Cuba, Belize, Panama, Columbia, Venezuela then down rivers huge and small from the top of S. America to Buenos Aries!  LOOK AT A MAP!, (sorry for shouting).  Then he sailed back up a different system of rivers where his wife had a baby in central Brazil, then the 3 continued up to the Amazon and out to the Atlantic where his wife and newborn son flew home to Bremerton.  Then he single handed, hand steering, (no auto pilot or wind vane) up the east and north coast of S. America to Trinidad, the windward islands, etc, where he was surprised by a sneaker wave and shipwrecked on the eastern most part of Dominican Republic.   All with portages and piloting made up on the fly (with the help & guidance of villagers), often needing that skinny 7" draft.  They made their own charts from google earth as there are none for the smaller and remote rivers!  Amazing, no one had ever done that before, though his inspiration stemmed from Dan and son Dana Starkell from Winnipeg who did a smaller but still amazing 1980’s voyage in northern South America.  I can’t tell all his amazing story here but he has a well written blog where you can read all about it and plenty of other stuff about him on the interwebs.  Just google the adventures of Ginny and Steve and you will have reading and dreaming for all next winter.  I will post a map of his big trip below.  You really need to look in on his blog.  See the map attached below.

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It seems that folks in Wayfarer dinghies, following Frank Dye’s incredible ocean crossings way back in the day (as described in his classic book, “Ocean Crossing Wayfarer”, inspired others to undertake some impressive dinghy adventures of their own.  Who knew!  I’ve been poking around the web the past few days, reading about Wayfarers, toying with the idea of getting one now.

I didn’t grow up dinghy sailing, and had no idea of the capabilities of such small boats. I feel like it’s a whole new world to explore, even though I may not want to cruise the...gulp...coast of Labrador?!?

Here’s the story of a couple of dudes back in the ‘80s (when people were tougher :-) ) who sailed north amongst icebergs up the remote and challenging (25 ft tides!) Labrador coast to, yes, climb some rock/ice/snow peaks in the even more remote Torngat Mountains...sheesh! :-)

http://www.wayfarer-international.org/WIC/Cruise.Logs/1981.Geoff.Heath.log/Geoff.Heath.log.html

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I owned Wayfarer #4794 in the early 80's. It was a fun boat, and I had great dreams of sailing it everywhere, Dye-style. Had a custom boom tent made, upgraded to a Harken traveller and all new blocks, new sails...the whole deal. I sailed all over Saskatchewan, and trailered it out to the coast for a couple of weeks of sailing with a friend through the Gulf Islands.

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46 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I owned Wayfarer #4794 in the early 80's. It was a fun boat, and I had great dreams of sailing it everywhere, Dye-style. Had a custom boom tent made, upgraded to a Harken traveller and all new blocks, new sails...the whole deal. I sailed all over Saskatchewan, and trailered it out to the coast for a couple of weeks of sailing with a friend through the Gulf Islands.

Cool!  I posted this (below) in the “Girl with Patreon Account goes sailing in hot place“ thread - but it really belongs here.  Looks way more pleasurable than taking a Wayfarer to Labrador.   A 4,000 mile cruise through the Greek Isles, across the Med, then down the Nile!  Very cool...I’d definitely consider doing something like this closer by, in say, Baja Mexico or something.   Great little film.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Kuy4goz3stI

 

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38 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Cool!  I posted this (below) in the “Girl with Patreon Account goes sailing in hot place“ thread - but it really belongs here.  Looks way more pleasurable than taking a Wayfarer to Labrador.   A 4,000 mile cruise through the Greek Isles, across the Med, then down the Nile!  Very cool...I’d definitely consider doing something like this closer by, in say, Baja Mexico or something.   Great little film.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Kuy4goz3stI

 

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Thanks for that.

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On 8/26/2020 at 8:55 PM, Russell Brown said:

Here's a fun one. My wife didn't think so, but I did.

I thought it was Grizzly bears I needed to worry about, but it was black flies and water drops on my camera that were the problem.

 

Nicely done!

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Back to the Caravelle for a moment.... here are some shots of the cruising version, the Caragnone.  I wondered if the design kept the centerboard until I found that fuzzy last shot.

This one's built with that aft lazarette, which is a good idea, IMHO. The forward cabin really isn't big enough to sleep in, but it's a great place to store your kit.

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Clearly, while the National Caravelle is a one design, there's some variation on how people build the  Caragnone's...

 

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So...centerboard? Daggerboard? What...

oh wow...

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Roger Barnes, President of the UK’s Dinghy Cruising Association, has written a book of his experiences in his 15’ open dinghy, Avel Dro.  He’s not as adventurous as Frank Dye was but has lots of good advice on how to organise yourself and your open boat for extended coastal passages.  There have been several books like this published in the past thirty years or so but I think this one is the best.  It’s called ‘The Dinghy Cruising Companion’.

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15 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Did you ever arrive at a launching ramp and find it looks like this?

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Whoa. Definitely need a sacrificial keel strip for that. I hope there's no launching fee.

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We sailed our Beetle cats all over Narragansett bay as kids, including camping. Later I had a boom tent for my 110. Camping on the S-boats was downright civilized. 

The venerable Twenty Hundred Club on Narragansett bay was founded by S-Boat sailors racing to Block Island and Cuttyhunk.We have a Trinka 10 with sailing rig, a fine small yacht. 

 

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21 hours ago, Ajax said:

Whoa. Definitely need a sacrificial keel strip for that. I hope there's no launching fee.

In a limited degree of fairness, I'll add that I think it's only meant for kayaks and other very light boats, but if that is the case, a bit of sandy beach would be better.

I dont know what rules apply.

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17 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

We sailed our Beetle cats all over Narragansett bay as kids, including camping. Later I had a boom tent for my 110. Camping on the S-boats was downright civilized. 

The venerable Twenty Hundred Club on Narragansett bay was founded by S-Boat sailors racing to Block Island and Cuttyhunk.We have a Trinka 10 with sailing rig, a fine small yacht. 

 

He said camping on an SBoat folks! That is downright classy!!!

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A guy asked me if I knew anyone that wanted to buy a dinghy and I said “Yes I do!” And picked it up immediately

11’ Ellen. Seems like it was either a nesting dinghy or built in two parts and permanently connected. Weird, but it sails really well and tracks a straight line when rowing or towing behind my old wooden cutter

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I figure this is a good place to ask this question-

What is the best tie-down method to securely lash a hard dinghy to the foredeck of the mothership?  I have a Dyer 9' and I have a slotted toe rail.  I've done it once but was unsatisfied with my method. The boat slipped from side to side under its lashings.

The Dyer has no...slots or eyes or hardware to pass lines through. I made a simply "X" over the hull, through the slotted toe rail. When I observed the side motion, I hurriedly passed a small fabric strap through the bronze rudder gudgeon and around the mast to keep it centered.  This was fine for the short distance and moderate conditions of the day but it won't be fine for a trip to Maine.

I'm not opposed to installing some sort of eyes for lashing down but they need to be aesthetically tolerable.

Thoughts?

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Foredeck? Will it fit under the boom on the cabin top? 

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Of course I can’t stand ugly brightwork on polyurethane so I had to strip and refinish it last spring during the lockdown

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55 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Foredeck? Will it fit under the boom on the cabin top? 

Possibly. I'll have to measure because it never occurred to me. It will be difficult for me to land it there though, especially alone.

The first time I did this, I used the forestay eye to clip the spinnaker halyard and haul it up over the lifelines onto the foredeck. I plan to make a lifting bridle for it this winter out of Dyneema or something.

So let's say that I make a bridle and instead of the spin halyard, clip the mainsail halyard to it. I guess I just unsheet the boom and move it out of the way while I pull the dinghy over to the cabin top?  I can lash the boat down to the teak grab rails but I'm unsure of their strength for this application.

Keeping the foredeck clear is appealing. I'll run down to the boat and visualize this, this afternoon.

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Fit may depend on your vang. A tackle vang may allow it where a rigid wouldn't. That's where we carried the Dyer on the C&C 35 MkI, but that boat was for racing and did not have a dodger. 

I'm sure i have a spare 3 point lifting bridle for a dinghy in RI. I can dig it out send it to you next time I go see Lola-Jane. 

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We brought a radio controlled sailboat over to my brother’s house and beached the boat. The girls were amazed at the feat!

 

 

 

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The boat is great to use at any point during its restoration

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On 9/30/2020 at 1:50 PM, Beanie 101 said:

Roger Barnes, President of the UK’s Dinghy Cruising Association, has written a book of his experiences in his 15’ open dinghy, Avel Dro.  He’s not as adventurous as Frank Dye was but has lots of good advice

Based on reading Dye’s book, which I’m currently doing, I can only conclude he was a madman.  A highly skilled and extremely well prepared one, but a madman nevertheless :-)

I wonder if anyone since has done anything like that in dinghies?  I suppose so - people have kayaked the Atlantic, etc.  Which still boggles my mind...but Dye sailed open dinghies to Iceland...

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Frank Dye’s idea of a romantic honeymoon was to sail with his new bride in an open dinghy to St Kilda, 50 miles west of the Outer Hebrides in the North Atlantic.

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2 hours ago, Beanie 101 said:

Frank Dye’s idea of a romantic honeymoon was to sail with his new bride in an open dinghy to St Kilda, 50 miles west of the Outer Hebrides in the North Atlantic.

I have a copy of Margret Dyes "Dinghy Cruising" (1992) she wrote after Frank passed, I guess they were a pretty good match.

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4 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

A long and nutty voyage to nowhere just like he planned!

 

Pretty hilarious.  He's one early pioneers of 3d printing.

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This story belongs here, I think, and not in the “Who’s Going to the Caribbean This Winter” thread  :-)  (Or maybe it deserves its own thread, “The Mighty Walker Bay 8: Where Will It Take You?” :-)  )

8 ft Walker Bay dinghy across the Bering Sea to Russia (en route to China, he accidentally landed in Russia).  Let’s just say an extraordinary amount of luck was at play here...(and bad luck too: he didn’t make it to China, somewhat unsurprisingly).  He says he specifically chose an 8 footer WB and not a larger model for two reasons - to try to remain undetected (as he was trying to enter China undetected); and because a small one would be easier to handle dragging up a beach. Sound reasoning so far, I guess, if those are your crazy goals and your budget is minuscule  :-)  He says he broke his “rudder hinge pin” due to “inexperience” after grounding the boat in shallow water...hmm...

One notable provision a story below says he had on board (for cold northern waters) was apparently a bunch of salmon bellies - because fatty and caloric, presumably.  At least he was (semi) prepared  :-)   Has he got a little 10 watt or so solar panel on the stern arch, or is that just his downwind rig/laundry dryer? :-)

Interview/video: 

https://www.alaskapublic.org/2018/12/12/this-alaskan-crossed-the-bering-sea-in-an-eight-foot-dinghy-russia-wants-to-send-him-back/

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/northwest/russia-returns-alaska-man-who-crossed-bering-sea-in-dinghy/

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Let’s try to resurrect this thread, shall we?

Pic from a friend today - a little winter dinghy adventure cruise around our island to go visit a friend.  I assume all is well with him, but his custom aluminum “zodiac” is bombproof! 

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My 3 year old son and I had a fun trip through the Ballard Locks in Seattle yesterday in our dinghy.  We motored there with our electric motor against the current (over 1 knot) and then had an easy row back.  It’s been a while since we had the little boat out and it was nice to have time on the water. 

My son dragged his hand in the water almost the whole time, even in cold water on a winter day.  That is his favorite part of our little boat. 

 

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@Ajax I solve the dinghy sliding around problem by compressing it into 3 throwable square foam things (one on the bow, one on each transom corner). 

Also a nice upgrade this year was getting a pair of take apart fiberglass oars from Sawyer.  I slightly prefer how nice spruce oars row, but I’ll take the easy storage and no varnishing of these ones. 

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1 hour ago, Alex W said:

@Ajax I solve the dinghy sliding around problem by compressing it into 3 throwable square foam things (one on the bow, one on each transom corner). 

Also a nice upgrade this year was getting a pair of take apart fiberglass oars from Sawyer.  I slightly prefer how nice spruce oars row, but I’ll take the easy storage and no varnishing of these ones. 

@Alex W

What take-apart Sawyer oars did you get for your dinghy?  I’d never heard of Sawyer and looked them up - their take-apart oars seem to be whitewater rafting oars...but sounds like you found some that will work for a dinghy?  I’m interested in maybe getting some.  (I bought some take-part pieces from Duckworks that you epoxy on to wooden oars so that they will come apart, but the oars I made I’m not 100% happy with...so I’m curious what fibreglass oars you got that work with a dinghy.)

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Thanks for sharing that Alex. I never knew about them. What did you do to bulk out the 1.25" shafts for the oarlocks?

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