Admiral Hornblower

Whats the fastest you've ever been on a dinghy?

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Details would be welcome, wind speed, type of boat, ect.

Probably the fastest I have ever been on a dinghy was on a Fireball in 9 to 25 kts. Unfortunately I didn't have a GPS.

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The fastest I have ever been in a race is first.

You can't go any faster than that.

Well you can, but if you do your friends will hate you and call you a dandelion.

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1 hour ago, tillerman said:

The fastest I have ever been in a race is first.

You can't go any faster than that.

Well you can, but if you do your friends will hate you and call you a dandelion.

They wouldn't call you that, if you didn't wear that funny yellow suit.......

:rolleyes:

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

They wouldn't call you that, if you didn't wear that funny yellow suit.......

:rolleyes:

FB- Doug

Really?

 

1XJC2_AS01?$zmmain$

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Been there, done that.   To this day still don’t know how fast you’re going in max conditions.  20?

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I think I hit 27Kts in my Hobie Wave on the trailer riding in the parking lot!  Too much fun.

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On 7/21/2020 at 3:29 PM, blunderfull said:

Been there, done that.   To this day still don’t know how fast you’re going in max conditions.  20?

Me too, but I had the advantage of a causeway blocking the waves,  smooth water plus wind like  that,  whatever flat out is in a laser I was doing it..  Pity it wasn't during a race.. 

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24 minutes ago, The Q said:

Me too, but I had the advantage of a causeway blocking the waves,  smooth water plus wind like  that,  whatever flat out is in a laser I was doing it..  Pity it wasn't during a race.. 

 

24 minutes ago, The Q said:

Me too, but I had the advantage of a causeway blocking the waves,  smooth water plus wind like  that,  whatever flat out is in a laser I was doing it..  Pity it wasn't during a race.. 

Fastest I’ve done was on Charles River/Boston.   Broad reaching from Mass Ave bridge down to Charles St bridge.   Smooth water.   Always on the edge of a blowup.    
 

Dead downwind in same conditions was big workout.  Early on I took John Bertrands advice:   ‘...toughest point of sail in a Laser is dead downwind in 20+ kts.....practice this and all the rest falls into place.’    True, so true.

Buzzards Bay off Marion for the BBR regatta was always pretty cool in big thermals and waves & dead downwind.   Broke a mast there burying bow in a puff.  
 

Playing the waves in big breeze was R.Scheidt’s great skill in Lasers & Stars.  He was simply untouchable downwind.

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On 7/20/2020 at 1:43 PM, Admiral Hornblower said:

Details would be welcome, wind speed, type of boat, ect.

Probably the fastest I have ever been on a dinghy was on a Fireball in 9 to 25 kts. Unfortunately I didn't have a GPS.

Most of the time when I've been going the fastest, it was just trying to keep the boat up & going, during conditions that either built up as we sailed, or hit us unexpectedly. For example, sailing a Johnson 18 which is a 2-person centerboard hiking boat with asymmetric, my wife and I were out for an evening practice before a big regatta. Instead of dying, the evening breeze kicked up and then kicked up some more.

We were still fairly new to the boat but we had specifically practiced spinnaker hoists and douses because we were both familiar with conventional spinnakers but asymmetrics. So we were going on a long downwind run, practicing gybes and feeling out where the transition point between power reaching/hiking and running deep, etc. We got a gust and the boat jumped up... it didn't die down but a minute or so later another harder gust hit. This continued until we were basically hanging on, surviving and watching the lee shore come at us really fast.

The centerboard & rudder went super-turbulent and the tiller was trying to shake itself out of my hand. You've heard the foils HUM when the boat lights up? This was about 4 steps past that, there would be a really loud buzz that would suddenly cut off. It felt like somebody going at the bottom of the boat with a chainsaw, or like we were riding on rough gravel, except it shut off like a switch then built back up again. It seemed like we were going 100 but in reality it was probably only in the mid-teens. We were running out of water fast, and there was no possible landing beach to leeward, all rock jetties and cement bulkheads, so we took the spinnaker down... carefully, by the numbers... I had  to help her pull the sheet in and not lose the hiking stick. It got easier as more of it got tucked away.

One good thing, it gave my wife a lot of confidence for handling the boat in strong winds after that.

FB- Doug

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Fastest I know I've gone in a dinghy is about 14 knots in my IC by phone GPS in about that much wind. The biggest fish on the other hand, is probably the time we hoisted the Cherub kite under a headland and discovered there was over 30 knots of breeze out of the shelter. I'm pretty confident we exceeded 15 knots. 

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Fastest ever, probably behind the team GBR rib being towed in on a laser from offshore La Rochelle when the wind dropped during IYRU world champs.

Fastest on a dinghy, my moth, but that doesn’t really count I suppose.

Fastest on a water hugger, 24.1 max, 22.8 knots 10 second average on a Sonnet scow, 30knots of breeze, broadreaching with the AWA at about 70 degrees or less.

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1 hour ago, Major Tom said:

Fastest ever, probably behind the team GBR rib being towed in on a laser from offshore La Rochelle when the wind dropped during IYRU world champs.

Fastest on a dinghy, my moth, but that doesn’t really count I suppose.

Fastest on a water hugger, 24.1 max, 22.8 knots 10 second average on a Sonnet scow, 30knots of breeze, broadreaching with the AWA at about 70 degrees or less.

24.1kts on a small scow is very impressive. Must have been flat water and scarey. 

If moths count I have 30.2kts also in 30kt wind, flat water and trying to get home safely close to DDW. Also scarey. Ended with a gentle square away and roll over as I ran out of water at the sailing club. No way I was going to try to round up. About 6 years ago, but still memorable. Not as brave any more.

 

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3 hours ago, Phil S said:

24.1kts on a small scow is very impressive. Must have been flat water and scarey. 

If moths count I have 30.2kts also in 30kt wind, flat water and trying to get home safely close to DDW. Also scarey. Ended with a gentle square away and roll over as I ran out of water at the sailing club. No way I was going to try to round up. About 6 years ago, but still memorable. Not as brave any more.

 

After sailing the moth nothing is scary as most of the time there is an easy escape from your situation, foilers often turn around and bite you! Where I live the breeze is often in the mid 30s to low 40s in summer, the scow likes flat water and consistent breeze so you can get the apparent wind forward and keep bearing off as you go faster. Tried going out in 43 knots but was slower as the chop meant we were bouncing all over the place, think we only saw 21 and a bit. The boat weighs about 90kg in sailing condition, has just over 10m2 sail area, so no drag in a breeze, is 4.375m long and works best sailed on the leeward chine. You need about 30kg more weight than optimal racing weight as you are hiking absolutely flat out, even though you are sailing at about 120deg below TWA.

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5 hours ago, Major Tom said:

After sailing the moth nothing is scary as most of the time there is an easy escape from your situation, foilers often turn around and bite you! Where I live the breeze is often in the mid 30s to low 40s in summer, the scow likes flat water and consistent breeze so you can get the apparent wind forward and keep bearing off as you go faster. Tried going out in 43 knots but was slower as the chop meant we were bouncing all over the place, think we only saw 21 and a bit. The boat weighs about 90kg in sailing condition, has just over 10m2 sail area, so no drag in a breeze, is 4.375m long and works best sailed on the leeward chine. You need about 30kg more weight than optimal racing weight as you are hiking absolutely flat out, even though you are sailing at about 120deg below TWA.

24 knots!! thats incredible!

Whats a Sonnet scow?

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5 hours ago, Major Tom said:

After sailing the moth nothing is scary as most of the time there is an easy escape from your situation, foilers often turn around and bite you! Where I live the breeze is often in the mid 30s to low 40s in summer, the scow likes flat water and consistent breeze so you can get the apparent wind forward and keep bearing off as you go faster. Tried going out in 43 knots but was slower as the chop meant we were bouncing all over the place, think we only saw 21 and a bit. The boat weighs about 90kg in sailing condition, has just over 10m2 sail area, so no drag in a breeze, is 4.375m long and works best sailed on the leeward chine. You need about 30kg more weight than optimal racing weight as you are hiking absolutely flat out, even though you are sailing at about 120deg below TWA.

When you're sailing so fast, apparent wind gets quite divergent from true and it can shift in direction and strength violently if you change speed or direction. Difficult to cope when everything is loaded up, too. I have tended more and more to think smaller boats are more fun, and a capsize is less potentially damaging dangerous. I've stopped at a lee shore by capsizing when there wasn't a better option!

We went out to race a 470, decades ago, in 35~40 but the race ended up being abandoned. I think we could have finished. There were some gusts that even with sails flogging, just blew the boat over until the sails were 1/2 in the water and sheltered in the lee of the hull. Maybe 45 kt or so? I've sailed keelboats in 45+ and at this point, the wind is like leaning against a wall.

FB- Doug

 

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Don't really know, but the 14s run 18-22 pretty often. We caught a puff in very flat water at Cascade locks on the Oregon side, pushed our heading 30 degrees+down as we caught up with the apparent, at a certain point I came in off the wire as a pitchpole (pre horizontal rudder foils) would have broken more than boat bits. low to mid 20s anyway.  My usually gung-ho crew thanked me for backing off. I'd never backed off in flat water before that (stupidity I suppose) but it was definitely fastest ever (for me) in a 14. 

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3 hours ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

24 knots!! thats incredible!

Whats a Sonnet scow?

 

F7A47782-C4B1-42AB-BC92-267FD0EAD73A.jpeg

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An E-scow is a big dinghy- right?

Lake Murray SC late 70's there was actually a fleet of 4-6 boats on the lake. Raced out of Columbia Sailing club and breeze built to unheard 25k (on a Southeast inland lake) Saturday morning. Only scow in the water was ours at the dock. Committee called off the regatta. Dad recruited crew off another scow and we went out with I think 6 bodies hiking. The dam is 1.5 miles long and the breeze was coming right over it. Club is next to one end. Flat water and nothing but screaming, 2 sail reaches. There might have been 10 ft of 28 long hull in the water.  Next day another local said he was driving home over the dam and clocked one pass at 42mph. I find that number suspect- but it certainly felt like we were on a motorboat flat out.  

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23 minutes ago, Fasterdamnit! said:

An E-scow is a big dinghy- right?

Lake Murray SC late 70's there was actually a fleet of 4-6 boats on the lake. Raced out of Columbia Sailing club and breeze built to unheard 25k (on a Southeast inland lake) Saturday morning. Only scow in the water was ours at the dock. Committee called off the regatta. Dad recruited crew off another scow and we went out with I think 6 bodies hiking. The dam is 1.5 miles long and the breeze was coming right over it. Club is next to one end. Flat water and nothing but screaming, 2 sail reaches. There might have been 10 ft of 28 long hull in the water.  Next day another local said he was driving home over the dam and clocked one pass at 42mph. I find that number suspect- but it certainly felt like we were on a motorboat flat out.  

I raced Lightnings at Lake Murray lots of times. Never a breath of wind, but everybody said it blew hard a good bit of the time. One of their annual regattas was called The Bottoms-Up. If we set any records there, it was for most gallons of sweat while going ver-r-r-r-y-y-y-y slow.

FB- Doug

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20 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

I raced Lightnings at Lake Murray lots of times. Never a breath of wind, but everybody said it blew hard a good bit of the time. One of their annual regattas was called The Bottoms-Up. If we set any records there, it was for most gallons of sweat while going ver-r-r-r-y-y-y-y slow.

FB- Doug

Yessir. Wind during the week and stillness for the regattas. Easter regatta used to be an E-scow event. All the Melges and other great lake folks would come down for an early warm weather race.

Drifting is an art! 

Now have a place on Rock Island.

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Hit 34 kts in my cape code frosty, blasted throuhh the 4th mode and made it to the 5th.  

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5 hours ago, eliboat said:

Hit 34 kts in my cape code frosty, blasted throuhh the 4th mode and made it to the 5th.  

You're evil

-DSK

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

You're evil

-DSK

Eli is also reputed to have broken 20k in a 110. That's what I call Hunt mode.

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17 hours ago, eliboat said:

Hit 34 kts in my cape code frosty, blasted throuhh the 4th mode and made it to the 5th.  

LOL... Had to look this up being from the UK. 

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9 hours ago, fastyacht said:

Eli is also reputed to have broken 20k in a 110. That's what I call Hunt mode.

This is actually true.   Nothing quite as sweet as a 110 locked in planing on a blast reach.  Funny enough we clocked that speed with the jib and main, as we had rounded the top mark and decided against hoisting the kite given how fast we were going.   

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On 7/24/2020 at 3:47 PM, Steam Flyer said:

I raced Lightnings at Lake Murray lots of times. Never a breath of wind, but everybody said it blew hard a good bit of the time. One of their annual regattas was called The Bottoms-Up. If we set any records there, it was for most gallons of sweat while going ver-r-r-r-y-y-y-y slow.

FB- Doug

Carl Eichenlaub claimed to have been clocked at 20 knots in a Lightning. He didn't say what the wind strength was (other than pretty windy).

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20 minutes ago, Doug Halsey said:
On 7/24/2020 at 6:47 PM, Steam Flyer said:

I raced Lightnings at Lake Murray lots of times. Never a breath of wind, but everybody said it blew hard a good bit of the time. One of their annual regattas was called The Bottoms-Up. If we set any records there, it was for most gallons of sweat while going ver-r-r-r-y-y-y-y slow.

FB- Doug

Carl Eichenlaub claimed to have been clocked at 20 knots in a Lightning. He didn't say what the wind strength was (other than pretty windy).

I'd believe it. Seems quite possible to me.

I sailed a Lightning a LOT in high winds, 25+ probably near a hundred and 35 a dozen or so time. They get squirrelly, the rudder gets very turbulent and yanks the stern around, you have to keep weight aft because the chine at the bow makes it sheer suddenly in either direction almost at random, and the rig loads up. But it's also heavy and has enough initial stability to plane like a fast flat-bottomed motorboat, and it also proves the adage that it's much easier to sail fast in high winds than to sail slowly in high wind. Getting the boat accelerated and keeping it in balance as you initiate maneuvers is the most tricky part.

At one point, I took one of my best racing crew and a newbie out on a blustery fall day, wind clocked at 35 ~ 38 and fairly steady. With the board half up, and main alone, we could sail the boat almost close-hauled. I played the backstay, the middle crew played the mainsheet, and we worked at keeping it flat. Bearing away to a beam reach, the boat took off on a screaming plane in which we actually dried off because the spray was coming out from under the hull aft of where we were sitting! The wake was flat as a mowed lawn. We didn't even fly the jib, the spinnaker would have probably shredded before it was fully hoisted, and if not, I'm sure it would have yanked the boat flat with an epic smackdown.

The lake we were sailing had buoys spaced at what were supposed to be measured miles, and we timed a mile several times at 4 1/2 to 5 minutes, so 12 ~ 15 mph. And we went half again faster than that on some of the other wild nearly suicidal sails I had in that boat (#11900, some Lightning sailors may remember the purple boat). Other days of approximately the same wind strength, we hoisted the jib for broad reaching and the boat went considerably faster (lowering it was a struggle).

The new guy was very impressed but we had to tell him that sailing was not usually that exciting!

FB- Doug

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5 hours ago, eliboat said:

This is actually true.   Nothing quite as sweet as a 110 locked in planing on a blast reach.  Funny enough we clocked that speed with the jib and main, as we had rounded the top mark and decided against hoisting the kite given how fast we were going.   

in both the intl 420 as well as the 505, I've never gone faster than I have with jib&main. When the wind is up, that is the ticket!

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1 hour ago, fastyacht said:

in both the intl 420 as well as the 505, I've never gone faster than I have with jib&main. When the wind is up, that is the ticket!

It makes sense that your fastest speeds would be reaching, with an apparent-wind angle too small for a spinnaker (unless it's really windy). 

 

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Outright speed is one thing, but it is meaningless unless measured against what you are used to. Most of us have travelled at 500 knots, but that was on an aircraft and it didn't feel like anything. On boats, I have achieved 24 knots on an early foiling Moth (first time over 20 knots was terrifying), 26 knots on an 18 and 28.5 on an A Class. The 18 felt the most "sedate" while on the A, doing 22-23 knots upwind is far more extreme than 28 downwind. I think the biggest OMG moments have been in the early days of foiling Moths, when I broke the 20 knot barrier (achieved 22 knots) and the first time I got the A properly going upwind at 22 knots. Clearly, those 2 events were significantly less than my best speeds, but in terms of what they were relative to my previous experiences, they were the moments that stick in the mind because they represented something like a 20% increase in speed compared with my "reference point". I think this holds true for whatever boat you sail - its not the ultimate speed but the increase compared with normal that provides the thrill/scare factor.

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Windy day on a lake on my Laser, with the wind blowing from the proper direction to let you reach back and forth along the length of the lake.  At one point I caught the wake of a powerboat and was able to ride it for quite a distance.  No idea the speed, and I'm sure it wasn't that fast, but it was definitely the fastest I've ever felt in the boat.

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2 hours ago, torrid said:

Windy day on a lake on my Laser, with the wind blowing from the proper direction to let you reach back and forth along the length of the lake.  At one point I caught the wake of a powerboat and was able to ride it for quite a distance.  No idea the speed, and I'm sure it wasn't that fast, but it was definitely the fastest I've ever felt in the boat.

I've certainly caught the wake of a speeding boat before, but since our speed limit is only 4mph through the village, that's not hard.

Since the top limit for a motor boat on the broads is 6mph, the hire boats are only designed for that. So if pushed to above that they produce a large wake, which can be quite an advantage in a light wind race if you can catch it ..

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Not really a dingy but 20.4 knots on a VX One.   Helmed a 53' "sunset sail" party cat at 17 knots going to weather between St. Thomas and St. John.  Managed to sweet talk the skipper into letting me drive while he went below for a cocktail.  Got the weather hull to lift just a smidge while chasing the apparent wind down, but it never broke the water.  Pretty sure the skipper was the only one who noticed.  He didn't stay below long.....

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On 7/27/2020 at 12:06 AM, torrid said:

Windy day on a lake on my Laser, with the wind blowing from the proper direction to let you reach back and forth along the length of the lake.  At one point I caught the wake of a powerboat and was able to ride it for quite a distance.  No idea the speed, and I'm sure it wasn't that fast, but it was definitely the fastest I've ever felt in the boat.

13 kt on laser is fastest i've gone on one. The spectator boat at King's Point was getting slowly overtaken by us on the second reach (remember them?) and she was doing 13.

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15 minutes ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

??

Lame joke at the end of a long hot day. 

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On my Hobie 16, GPS clocked 28 kts headed up the river on the "Delta Ditch" run near Sherman Island.  That was an instantaneous speed, but it was terrifying, and the whole run up the river had an average of about 20kts (~7 miles from Sherman Island to Rio Vista took a little over 20 minutes).  Nothing like trapping off the back of the rudder with the crew in your lap using body english to try to keep the damn leeward bow out of the water...

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All in the name of fun... here's another fun one... clocked at 23kts over a measured 1/4 mile.  And was dumping a "fair" amount of air given the main twist...

Black_butte_22k.jpg.aef016906bc569b2600160a8f9ccd6ba.jpg

 

(Not nearly as fast a mode of sail, but included for the WHEEEEEEEE!  Same day, same wind. )

1867344916_ScreenShot2020-07-29at9_56_37AM.thumb.png.75e663fe2f38aa6bf19d60160b8dcbb8.png

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55 minutes ago, RedHerring said:

All in the name of fun... here's another fun one... clocked at 23kts over a measured 1/4 mile.  And was dumping a "fair" amount of air given the main twist...

Black_butte_22k.jpg.aef016906bc569b2600160a8f9ccd6ba.jpg

 

(Not nearly as fast a mode of sail, but included for the WHEEEEEEEE!  Same day, same wind. )

1867344916_ScreenShot2020-07-29at9_56_37AM.thumb.png.75e663fe2f38aa6bf19d60160b8dcbb8.png

absolutely fabulous!

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One memorable day was years ago on the Ohio River two-handed on a Thistle as a summer thunderstorm passed close. Beam / broad reach (at first under main alone and then main and jib), both hiked as far back as possible and the front 1/3 of the boat out of the water with constant spray approaching the first diamond on the mast. Of course, being Kentucky in the summer, that sail ended almost drifting back to the dock but the memory of those 10 minutes or so survives 35+ years.

To me the actual number isn't as important as how it feels especially inches from the water.

Ice boats are fast but the real speed sensation comes from the small chips of ice hitting your goggles visor.

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51 minutes ago, Alan Crawford said:

One memorable day was years ago on the Ohio River two-handed on a Thistle as a summer thunderstorm passed close. Beam / broad reach (at first under main alone and then main and jib), both hiked as far back as possible and the front 1/3 of the boat out of the water with constant spray approaching the first diamond on the mast. Of course, being Kentucky in the summer, that sail ended almost drifting back to the dock but the memory of those 10 minutes or so survives 35+ years.

To me the actual number isn't as important as how it feels especially inches from the water.

Ice boats are fast but the real speed sensation comes from the small chips of ice hitting your goggles visor.

I quite agree with you about the sensation of speed being more important than the actual speed. But its is fun to see the numbers as well.

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57 minutes ago, Alan Crawford said:

o me the actual number isn't as important as how it feels especially inches from the water

Yes. On a laser: 1990 Nationals San Fran. On a reach leg. Blowing over 20. Couldn’t  see a thing through the spray. Felt like the boat was skipping over the waves. Boat was making sounds i haven’t heard since. On a cat: lake in Texas crewing on a Nacra 5.8. Flat water squall blows in reaching for shore. Both of us screaming like maniacs. On a keel boat: Moore 24 with spin up blowing 20-25. Everyone at the back to keep bow from plowing. Praying rig held.

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32 minutes ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

I quite agree with you about the sensation of speed being more important than the actual speed. But its is fun to see the numbers as well.

IDK.  Was on a GL70 in about 20 knots.  Rounded the weather mark and when the chute filled went from 8 knots to 14 on the speedo.  Feeling 70 feet of boat move out from under you is a pretty crazy feeling.

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23 hours ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

absolutely fabulous!

Yeah.  Being trapped out and flying is a whole'nother experience!

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I've done over 20 a few times and recorded it. Below was one time during a race. Inland water so nice and flat. 

Our harbour is very tidal, so against the current it's pretty much impossible to get over 18 knots. No matter how windy it gets, the chop slows you down. 

With the tide, in flat water I reckon 22 is achievable. I heard a few people claim much higher speeds in the 800, but we don't seem to be able to achieve them, and we go out when it pretty fresh. Perhaps it's because we don't do much two reaching when out practising and from the few times we have during a race that is quite often what produces the highest speeds. 

There's quite a lot of high speeds recorded by pretty slow boats like aeros and lasers which I find the most incredible. It's hard to imagine them going that fast, even at full plane. But I guess it's true. They have the advantage of being able to launch and 'survive' conditions that you just couldn't in a skiff. 

 

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I completely understand where you are coming from, with a kite up your VMG goes up massively, but so does the drag of the rig, there is one Sonnet with an assym fitted, it is fast, but about 20 degrees lower, top speed is in the mid 21s with 18m2 more sail, but probably 25% faster on a long dead downwind leg in 28 knots. Without a kite there seems to be a sweet spot where you get the apparent dialed in and as long as you aren’t bouncing around you keep going faster until you run out if breeze, runway or righting moment.

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6 hours ago, Mozzy Sails said:

I've done over 20 a few times and recorded it. Below was one time during a race. Inland water so nice and flat. 

Our harbour is very tidal, so against the current it's pretty much impossible to get over 18 knots. No matter how windy it gets, the chop slows you down. 

With the tide, in flat water I reckon 22 is achievable. I heard a few people claim much higher speeds in the 800, but we don't seem to be able to achieve them, and we go out when it pretty fresh. Perhaps it's because we don't do much two reaching when out practising and from the few times we have during a race that is quite often what produces the highest speeds. 

There's quite a lot of high speeds recorded by pretty slow boats like aeros and lasers which I find the most incredible. It's hard to imagine them going that fast, even at full plane. But I guess it's true. They have the advantage of being able to launch and 'survive' conditions that you just couldn't in a skiff. 

 

I admit I'm a little confused by that to, the highest speed record for the RS Aero is 23 knots, really?! 

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In today's installment of Sunfish can be fun...  it was too windy for my ability on my own boats, but I was at my parents' cottage. Wheee

 

IMG_5275.jpg

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18 hours ago, posaune said:

In today's installment of Sunfish can be fun...  it was too windy for my ability on my own boats, but I was at my parents' cottage. Wheee

 

IMG_5275.jpg

How much wind? I think that might be a speed record as well,

 

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Yesterday it was blowing 25 to 30 with 3 foot waves, I was going have a go at the Sunfish speed record but nobody wanted to go out or man a rescue boat. So I couldn't go. Oh well. Maybe next time:D

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On 7/29/2020 at 1:01 PM, RedHerring said:

All in the name of fun... here's another fun one... clocked at 23kts over a measured 1/4 mile.  And was dumping a "fair" amount of air given the main twist...

Black_butte_22k.jpg.aef016906bc569b2600160a8f9ccd6ba.jpg

 

(Not nearly as fast a mode of sail, but included for the WHEEEEEEEE!  Same day, same wind. )

1867344916_ScreenShot2020-07-29at9_56_37AM.thumb.png.75e663fe2f38aa6bf19d60160b8dcbb8.png

Looks like you have broken the H16 speed record of  26 knots  https://totaljoyrider.com/blogs/news/global-speed-stick-hobie-16-updated-11-06-2020 IF you want to put your speed on the speed stick just look in the description of one of his recent Show Us Your Cat vidos

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18 hours ago, posaune said:

In today's installment of Sunfish can be fun...  it was too windy for my ability on my own boats, but I was at my parents' cottage. Wheee

 

IMG_5275.jpg

My recommendation for strong wind sailing in the Sunfish is to adjust the lateen yard up & forward a little bit.

Up so as to lessen the likelihood of getting caught under the boom and forward to balance the boat a little better / unload the rudder.

They're great heavy air boats, just don't fall out. In wind heavy enough to capsize them at once if the human control is removed, they are actually much better behaved.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

How much wind? I think that might be a speed record as well,

Dark Sky said 17 with 33mph gusts. Sadly, my SpeedPuck was set to MPH, not Knots, so it's less impressive than it looks. I didn't realize that until I got back in. There was a little squall right after I went out, though, and had I been sailing in that, and could have kept the boat upright, I'd expect a bit more speed. As it was, I could barely hold the boat in the water and I was watching a 14' kayak roll about 50' side-over-side toward my car(!) Fortunately it stopped just before my hood....

2 hours ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

Yesterday it was blowing 25 to 30 with 3 foot waves, I was going have a go at the Sunfish speed record but nobody wanted to go out or man a rescue boat. So I couldn't go. Oh well. Maybe next time:D

Meh. Rescue boat schmrescue boat.  I just made sure to keep my home shore downwind, so I knew that eventually the boat and I would blow back if I had a problem. :P

1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

My recommendation for strong wind sailing in the Sunfish is to adjust the lateen yard up & forward a little bit.

Up so as to lessen the likelihood of getting caught under the boom and forward to balance the boat a little better / unload the rudder.

They're great heavy air boats, just don't fall out. In wind heavy enough to capsize them at once if the human control is removed, they are actually much better behaved.

FB- Doug

I have more experience in Sunfish in lots of wind than a reasonable person probably should, but I lost a bunch of weight during this whole "your bars are closed and you're making no money for the foreseeable future" time, so it was a little more exciting than I expected. Most of my time in stupid wind had been on a '76 though. I don't know what the setup differences would be, but this '05 seems to be much better behaved, especially with regard to weather helm. My only problem was the occasional stalled tack, which I expected.

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I was in 20-25mph gusts on a little 12ft skiff, must have been my second or third time out, and poor tiller management and poor understanding of hiking caused me to go flying as a gust and wave hit me almost simultaneously and capsized the boat (more of a board, really).  I'd guess that I was going about 12mph when my body landed in the drink.

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Fastest dinghy ride by the feel of it ever? I-420. 2 sail reach. Next fastest? 505, 2 sail reach. Actual speeds? Who knows.

When you are seeing the board of a 420 out of the water the whole time, and the boat is skipping little waves like a windsurfer, it feels fast.

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15 hours ago, Grestone said:

I was in 20-25mph gusts on a little 12ft skiff, must have been my second or third time out, and poor tiller management and poor understanding of hiking caused me to go flying as a gust and wave hit me almost simultaneously and capsized the boat (more of a board, really).  I'd guess that I was going about 12mph when my body landed in the drink.

Technically, that would be 'The Fastest You've Ever Been OFF A Dinghy'

You'll have to do a thread 720

FB- Doug

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12 hours ago, fastyacht said:

Fastest dinghy ride by the feel of it ever? I-420. 2 sail reach. Next fastest? 505, 2 sail reach. Actual speeds? Who knows.

When you are seeing the board of a 420 out of the water the whole time, and the boat is skipping little waves like a windsurfer, it feels fast.

Does I-420 mean no trap and no spin?

And how could a 420 be faster than a 505?! Am I missing something?

505 DPN 80.90

420 DPN 100.0

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On 7/24/2020 at 1:47 AM, Major Tom said:

Fastest ever, probably behind the team GBR rib being towed in on a laser from offshore La Rochelle when the wind dropped during IYRU world champs.

Fastest on a dinghy, my moth, but that doesn’t really count I suppose.

Fastest on a water hugger, 24.1 max, 22.8 knots 10 second average on a Sonnet scow, 30knots of breeze, broadreaching with the AWA at about 70 degrees or less.

Do you think we could achieve that sort of speed in a Fireball? in the same amount of wind?

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36 minutes ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

Does I-420 mean no trap and no spin?

And how could a 420 be faster than a 505?! Am I missing something?

505 DPN 80.90

420 DPN 100.0

I iscinternational. Tje original voat  trap ans spin and lightervthan c420.

Portsmouth doesnt mean speed. It is acrating around a course. Absolite speed is a function of many things. Windsirfersvare fastervtha  boats. Small is beaurtiful  420 is small. In right conditions can go very fast.

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22 Knots on a rented Hobie Tiger (chartered) off of Paradise Island, Bahamas.

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By the way, just found this decent fireball on Ebay for under $500 (while bidding lasts) that could be ballistically fast for someone in Wisconsin (wish I lived there now).

https://www.ebay.com/itm/16-Western-Fireball-Sailcraft-w-Trailer-NO-MOTOR-T1292168/313165498065?hash=item48ea1e46d1:g:MjkAAOSw6Ode18RK

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1 hour ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

Does I-420 mean no trap and no spin?

And how could a 420 be faster than a 505?! Am I missing something?

505 DPN 80.90

420 DPN 100.0

i420 has a different deck layout and slightly more sail area than the c420, i420 is trap+spin, c420 can be trap+spin or JAM (esp. High School and College Sailing). i420 sailing is very limited in the United States. Dixie Portsmouth smaller number = faster, 5O5 base 80.2, i420 base 98.2.

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2 hours ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

Do you think we could achieve that sort of speed in a Fireball? in the same amount of wind?

I don’t think so, in the early 80s my local club used to have the strongest Fireball fleet in the world, 4 in the top 10, the Sonnets were quicker on a 2 sail reach back then, the Sonnet has since been upgraded more than the Fireballs over the same period. Around a course a well sailed Winder Fireball will however destroy a well sailed modern Sonnet. 

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4 hours ago, fastyacht said:

I iscinternational. Tje original voat  trap ans spin and lightervthan c420.

Portsmouth doesnt mean speed. It is acrating around a course. Absolite speed is a function of many things. Windsirfersvare fastervtha  boats. Small is beaurtiful  420 is small. In right conditions can go very fast.

tenor.gif

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T

3 hours ago, Raz'r said:

 

That looks absolutely terrifying:blink:

and a great video as well! Thanks for sharing

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9 minutes ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

T

That looks absolutely terrifying:blink:

and a great video as well! Thanks for sharing

The inversion before the mast blew up was a bit unnerving.

I wasn't able to make it this time around as I was supposed to burn vacation on a PacCup. Which didn't happen.

Ah well.

 

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1 hour ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

T

That looks absolutely terrifying:blink:

and a great video as well! Thanks for sharing

Just keep practicing.

anybody who’s relatively physically fit and willing to pay the price can do it

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On 8/4/2020 at 10:22 PM, Raz'r said:

 

Ughhhh I thought I had managed to forget about that moment. Don't drop your mainsheet when you plow into a wave when its blowing 20 kts kids. 

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On 8/4/2020 at 2:22 PM, Raz'r said:

 

Good fun!

My best: I-14, Cascade Locks, OR: '09 with a 20 to 25+ wind against a 3 knot river, my Velocitek recorded a 23.5 knot, 10 sec average.

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went out today in a old Sunfish in 15-25 kts, fastest I have ever been on a Sunfish and great fun.

Max speed: 12.1 mph

DSCN3829.thumb.JPG.1cec69e3795428c5d20be4f8a7705baf.JPGDSCN3830.thumb.JPG.c8601afe02ff66bdb29f12a511eae9d5.JPGDSCN3831.thumb.JPG.0c127c9ea5ea28c5951c6d860a65495d.JPGDSCN3835.thumb.JPG.42ccecc6e887e8b439dce952f286db09.JPGDSCN3836.thumb.JPG.8b2f548f53d2fe513465815bb8331d32.JPG

 

DSCN3832.JPG

DSCN3833.JPG

 

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42 minutes ago, Admiral Hornblower said:

in 15-25 kts,

I meant to say 15 gusting 25 MPH!

and again, the photos don't live to up the wind speed or the boatspeed.

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On 7/24/2020 at 6:47 PM, Steam Flyer said:

I raced Lightnings at Lake Murray lots of times. Never a breath of wind, but everybody said it blew hard a good bit of the time. One of their annual regattas was called The Bottoms-Up. If we set any records there, it was for most gallons of sweat while going ver-r-r-r-y-y-y-y slow.

FB- Doug

It's always hotter in Columbia, except Augusta:lol:

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I once went to down the mine in a laser. Also got into a death roll upwind in 30+ knots of wind. The boat was on fire that day. 

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On 8/5/2020 at 8:02 PM, Liquid said:

Good fun!

My best: I-14, Cascade Locks, OR: '09 with a 20 to 25+ wind against a 3 knot river, my Velocitek recorded a 23.5 knot, 10 sec average.

I think I remember that.  Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't that the one where we hooked up with a puff on the Oregon side, not far down wind from the launch, in flat water, where there's shelter from the waves provided by the launch area and Thunder Island.  Gave us a nice header too.

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In the 2001 Konocti Cup we sailed for about 2 miles holding between 26-28 mph. Two different speedos agreed. The boat, our 24 foot Raven. We set a course record.

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