Gybe Talker

New guy, first sailboat

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I joined this forum awhile ago and have enjoyed all the witty repartee from all involved, seems like my kind of place. This is my first boat of any kind over 20' , I've sailed in a bunch of dinghys and on a few larger boats belonging to friends and relatives. We bought a vacation property in Goderich Ontario last fall that happens to be part of a marina and right on Lake Huron so it seemed natural to get a sailboat to enjoy.

 After a few offers on local boats that didn't pan out this one came up right at the marina we are. It's a 1979 Pearson 26 One Design, which is perfect for me because I'm going to be day sailing mostly. Once I get comfortable with it, I'll take it out for an overnight somewhere on the Huron shore. My dad and brother both have cottages on Georgian Bay(Woods bay area), the plan for next year if things go well is to take it over there and moor in the Massassauga Provincial Park and back, looks like a good trip with an eye on going up to the North Channel later on. The boat does not have anywhere near standing headroom,. so it's more like camping with a hard shell tent.

The motor was not running well at all, it went to the shop and came back running well,I had it out last weekend and had a blast with some buddies.

So far I have just over a grand into it, lots of work to do, but I have time and am familiar with working on boats, should keep me out of trouble.

Here's a  pic, it needs some spit and polish for sure, but it's mine!

 20200530_110011.thumb.jpg.63d71ed324cf133470257f8b13307a1b.jpg

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Looks great, sounds like a good fit for what you want to do. Hope you enjoy it often with family and friends

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Looks great. I have to say I always admire people who worked their way into sailing by force of their own interest in it. I grew up doing it, and I'm not sure I ever would have started otherwise - the learning curve (and the spending curve) is so steep! So, extra kudos to you - even though it might lack standing headroom, the only limit to how far you can go in that thing is how far you can convince your wife* to go in that thing!

(I'm loath to be the one who starts in with the suggestions but if you are going to do much anchoring you might really consider getting a more modern bow anchor. Even a decent bruce would be a huge upgrade in terms of security, and wouldn't break the bank)

 

 

*or husband/life partner/soulmate/nonbinary nondenominational sailing friend/local catholic priest/whatever

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Looks great and should be a fun project. small boat = smaller cost so its a good starter.

 

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Didn't you listen to the brokers and other pro's?

Nowadays a starter boat is 38'.

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The intention was to get something cheap to get out on the lake, if my wife is with we would likely motor out of the harbour and swing around in front of the beach there and drop the hook to swim etc. I did find a 16kg Bruce anchor up in the forward locker so I'm OK there. The one on the bow is OK for a lunch hook, the one on the stern is gone now, no real use for it.

I've done lots of camping in the Massassauga with my 3 kids in tin boats, I was brought up going on canoe trips and doing all sorts of camping so to me this is luxury!

The head is coming out , it's old and nasty. Had it pumped out as well ,it had been a couple of years:( Thinking of going with a porta pottie for the time being, we'll see what happens there but a place for the girls to go would be welcome I would think.

The mainsail is from a Chrysler 22, so it's kind of comically small but it gets the boat moving in the wind, I'll keep my eyes open for a suitable replacement.

Will also look at the wiring, currently have to touch 2 wires together to run the bilge pump, not ideal. Running lights are not working either, it's on the list for this weekend. The only instruments I have are a compass, a handheld VHF and Navionics on my phone. Nowhere to go but up!

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1 hour ago, Breamerly said:

Looks great. I have to say I always admire people who worked their way into sailing by force of their own interest in it. I grew up doing it, and I'm not sure I ever would have started otherwise - the learning curve (and the spending curve) is so steep! So, extra kudos to you - even though it might lack standing headroom, the only limit to how far you can go in that thing is how far you can convince your wife* to go in that thing!

(I'm loath to be the one who starts in with the suggestions but if you are going to do much anchoring you might really consider getting a more modern bow anchor. Even a decent bruce would be a huge upgrade in terms of security, and wouldn't break the bank)

 

 

*or husband/life partner/soulmate/nonbinary nondenominational sailing friend/local catholic priest/whatever

Yes, agreed... problem is that Bruces are hard to find nowadays. Don't get a CQR, but the Delta or similar (plow shape without the swivel) works fairly well in the 20 lb size.

The two biggest potential snafus I see are the roller furler and of course the engine. Only mentioning because avoiding trouble is 3/4 of how sailors looks good and have fun. Well, avoiding certain types of trouble... other types of trouble are actually fun, once you can get yourself out handily enough.

Nice sailing little boats, I had use of a Pearson 26 with the still-not-full-headroom cruising cabin arrangement; more recently on her big sister the P30

FB- Doug

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Have fun with that nice boat!

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9 minutes ago, Gybe Talker said:

the one on the stem [...] no real use for it.

SHOTS FIRED!

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2 minutes ago, Breamerly said:
12 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Bruces are hard to find nowadays

???

https://www.seamar.com/products/589/Bruce-Style-Anchors/

Correction... Bruces are not that hard to find if you have the right friends and don't mind paying shipping......

-_-

Those look like the real ones, not the hammered copied Lewmar was selling for a while. Avoid those, they break.

FB- Doug

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2 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Correction... Bruces are not that hard to find if you have the right friends and don't mind paying shipping......

-_-

Those look like the real ones, not the hammered copied Lewmar was selling for a while. Avoid those, they break.

FB- Doug

I mean, I can't help that you decided to make your home in the forgotten wasteland that is the entire rest of the country besides the Puget Sound region. Good day.

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1 minute ago, Breamerly said:

I mean, I can't help that you decided to make your home in the forgotten wasteland that is the entire rest of the country besides the Puget Sound region. Good day.

I bet you're either a bass player, or always wanted to be one.

FB- Doug

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look let's just keep this civil and focus on the real topic at hand: the importance of laying a kedge

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little sister to Pearson 30, which I crewed on racing back in the 70s- good boat for the day.  The hull of the 26 looks like an exact scaled down 30.  Will sail well all around, you should have a blast.

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2 hours ago, Gybe Talker said:

 

The mainsail is from a Chrysler 22, so it's kind of comically small but it gets the boat moving in the wind, I'll keep my eyes open for a suitable replacement.

 

here's a couple places to find something used..

https://baconsails.com/

https://www.secondwindsails.com/

http://www.minneysyachtsurplus.com/sails.html

http://usedsailslist.com/advance_search.html

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2 hours ago, Gybe Talker said:

The intention was to get something cheap to get out on the lake, if my wife is with we would likely motor out of the harbour and swing around in front of the beach there and drop the hook to swim etc. I did find a 16kg Bruce anchor up in the forward locker so I'm OK there. The one on the bow is OK for a lunch hook, the one on the stern is gone now, no real use for it.

I've done lots of camping in the Massassauga with my 3 kids in tin boats, I was brought up going on canoe trips and doing all sorts of camping so to me this is luxury!

The head is coming out , it's old and nasty. Had it pumped out as well ,it had been a couple of years:( Thinking of going with a porta pottie for the time being, we'll see what happens there but a place for the girls to go would be welcome I would think.

The mainsail is from a Chrysler 22, so it's kind of comically small but it gets the boat moving in the wind, I'll keep my eyes open for a suitable replacement.

Will also look at the wiring, currently have to touch 2 wires together to run the bilge pump, not ideal. Running lights are not working either, it's on the list for this weekend. The only instruments I have are a compass, a handheld VHF and Navionics on my phone. Nowhere to go but up!

Congrats on the boat Gybe Talker! As it happens, I'm just at the moment overlooking the lee side of Christian Island, so basically part of your local cruising grounds, probably 20 miles south of Massassauga(I used to canoe trip around there too). A truly great place to cruise.

I'll second the upthread suggestions of a solid all-round anchor and keeping the engine in spec. 

I'd say though, its gonna be really important to sort out the sail situation and make sure you can point high and well enough. The difference between some baggy old mismatched sails and proper trim is as night and day as the weather on the lee side of Christian, and the open Georgian Bay on the weather side when things kick up.

You need to first sort out how well you can get that old girl punching into some weather with some confidence!

Good luck and have fun.

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2 minutes ago, fufkin said:

I'd say though, its gonna be really important to sort out the sail situation and make sure you can point high and well enough. The difference between some baggy old mismatched sails and proper trim is as night and day as the weather on the lee side of Christian, and the open Georgian Bay and L Huron on the weather side when things kick up.

You need to first sort out how well you can get that old girl punching into some weather with some confidence!

Agreed,I've only had it out sailing a couple of times so far. I will get a better mainsail in the near future as the budget allows, in the meantime I'll take it out with some more experienced sailors and see what it does. My father-in-law lives nearby, he's a lifelong sailor who's owned quite a few boats in his time and his input will be very valuable.I'm in no rush for anything to happen soon, will spend lots of time on the water in the meantime. I have quite a collection of anchors, I'll sort them out this weekend and select what's needed. The beach in front of the harbour will be a good testing ground for anchoring, I plan to spend time there to get it right.

Really liking getting out on the water, even a sunset cruise under power is nice on a calm night.

 

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Congrats on the new boat! Looks like you've made a modest choice that you can adjust to suit whatever you want to do with it!

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Congratulations! Very respectable choice for a first boat bought at the right price. Thank you for not starting out with a 50' catamaran and a plan to cross the pacific next week after you have gotten some experience on Saturday. Personally I like the anchor. Yes, if you want to actually anchor out a Bruce would be a sensible upgrade. However if you want to ram some shit, you are good to go!

I hope you and your 3 kids have many great adventures.

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Danforths (if it is in fact a real Danforth and not a knock-off) are excellent anchors for the likely sandy/gravelly/muddy bottom you probably will be sailing over and anchoring in.  Lighter than the other options and quite appropriate for a 26' boat.  They need 15' of chain on a swivel and they are happy.  Just put your hand on the rode when reversing and you can feel it dig in.  

If you want a valuable upgrade for overnighting, replace your running lights, riding light and cabin lights with LEDs and save much worry about battery life.

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9 hours ago, Gybe Talker said:

The intention was to get something cheap to get out on the lake, if my wife is with we would likely motor out of the harbour and swing around in front of the beach there and drop the hook to swim etc. I did find a 16kg Bruce anchor up in the forward locker so I'm OK there. The one on the bow is OK for a lunch hook, the one on the stern is gone now, no real use for it.

I've done lots of camping in the Massassauga with my 3 kids in tin boats, I was brought up going on canoe trips and doing all sorts of camping so to me this is luxury!

The head is coming out , it's old and nasty. Had it pumped out as well ,it had been a couple of years:( Thinking of going with a porta pottie for the time being, we'll see what happens there but a place for the girls to go would be welcome I would think.

The mainsail is from a Chrysler 22, so it's kind of comically small but it gets the boat moving in the wind, I'll keep my eyes open for a suitable replacement.

Will also look at the wiring, currently have to touch 2 wires together to run the bilge pump, not ideal. Running lights are not working either, it's on the list for this weekend. The only instruments I have are a compass, a handheld VHF and Navionics on my phone. Nowhere to go but up!

Do us all a favor.  Don't fix it up.  Go out and sail it till in sinks.  Too many new sailors start fixing their boats and realize that it's expensive as hell then quit.  Instead of just sailing what they have for fun.  Enjoy what you have.  It looks like fun.

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13 hours ago, Gybe Talker said:

The only instruments I have are a compass, a handheld VHF and Navionics on my phone. Nowhere to go but up!

Just put a Windex on your masthead, maybe add a depth sounder and that's all you need.  No current, so the GPS speed on your phone = boat speed.  The water (and tippy-ness) tells you as much about windspeed as you need to know - besides, it's not like you can change it!

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*ahem*

Whomever currently has the SA Rules of Order book please email it to me as I would like to review it.

We're waay past post number ten and not one snide newbie comment has yet been made.

What. The. HELL. People!

 

 

(dangit, wheres that place that SOL gets his knishes from?)

 

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13 minutes ago, hobot said:

*ahem*

Whomever currently has the SA Rules of Order book please email it to me as I would like to review it.

We're waay past post number ten and not one snide newbie comment has yet been made.

What. The. HELL. People!

 

 

(dangit, wheres that place that SOL gets his knishes from?)

 

They notte realley rulles............our moire licke gidelines.....                 :)

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20 hours ago, Left Shift said:
On 7/23/2020 at 12:46 PM, Gybe Talker said:

The only instruments I have are a compass, a handheld VHF and Navionics on my phone. Nowhere to go but up!

Just put a Windex on your masthead, maybe add a depth sounder and that's all you need.  No current, so the GPS speed on your phone = boat speed.  The water (and tippy-ness) tells you as much about windspeed as you need to know - besides, it's not like you can change it!

Depends on where he sails, but a depth sounder could be 'meh'  or it could be a godsend.

I think the sails need to be sorted out. Boats sail best with good sails

FB- Doug

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Lake Huron, according to the Navionics chart, has some interesting bathymetry.  

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9 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Lake Huron, according to the Navionics chart, has some interesting bathymetry.  

If you call rocks "interesting" yeah plenty!

One of my own key ambitions, as a sailor, is to never have a rock named after me

FB- Doug

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Congrats Gybe.  I love the P26; one of my favorite plastic classics under 27 feet.  Back in the day when I daydreamed about owning one myself (back in my "I-have-two-toddlers-all-I-can-afford-is-a-Sunfish" days), I found this website, which has a wealth of knowledge about the model.  

http://dan.pfeiffer.net/p26/boat.htm

Sail the hell out of her, or just get out on the water as often as possible.  You can't go wrong.  Have a blast!

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15 hours ago, summerheat said:

I am down the road in Bayfield if you ever need a hand Cheers 

Thanks, appreciate that. I hope to sail down for lunch sometime soon, Bayfield is nice and close:)

 

11 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

ust put a Windex on your masthead, maybe add a depth sounder and that's all you need.  No current, so the GPS speed on your phone = boat speed.  The water (and tippy-ness) tells you as much about windspeed as you need to know - besides, it's not like you can change it!

Windex is on the to-do list once the boat is out and the mast comes down for the first time is who knows when. Will also run new cables for the vhf and check the masthead light.

 

11 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Depends on where he sails, but a depth sounder could be 'meh'  or it could be a godsend.

I think the sails need to be sorted out. Boats sail best with good sails

Agreed on the sails, I'm on the lookout for something better, most of the used sail sites are US based, I'd prefer to find something north of the border if possible. I have a fish finder that shows depth, I'll use that once I mount the transducer.

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4 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

Congrats Gybe.  I love the P26; one of my favorite plastic classics under 27 feet.  Back in the day when I daydreamed about owning one myself (back in my "I-have-two-toddlers-all-I-can-afford-is-a-Sunfish" days), I found this website, which has a wealth of knowledge about the model.  

http://dan.pfeiffer.net/p26/boat.htm

Sail the hell out of her, or just get out on the water as often as possible.  You can't go wrong.  Have a blast!

I did find that website as well, lots of great info there to digest. I will be looking at the rudder bushings for sure, there is some play at the moment. Thanks for the encouraging words, I will do just that!

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On 7/24/2020 at 2:52 AM, Snaggletooth said:

They notte realley rulles............our moire licke gidelines.....                 :)

You mean the guidelines for noobs producing a photograph of their respective S/O’s boobs so we can see if he is worthy of posting amongst us?

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12 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Lake Huron, according to the Navionics chart, has some interesting bathymetry.  

 

2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

If you call rocks "interesting" yeah plenty!

One of my own key ambitions, as a sailor, is to never have a rock named after me

FB- Doug

The general area has lots of old shipwrecks and is popular with divers.

A depth sounder is obviously a requirement  but either studying the charts in advance or just knowing the area well even better. 7-10 ft of water with sand and then a big boulder or shoal just under/slightly above  the water is not uncommon. As a buddy of mine up near 12 Mile Bay says, ‘Keeps the riff-raff out’

They have pretty good small craft routes marked w buoys in some of the more commonly used but treacherous inland areas. Best to go slow and stay within the marks!

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

If you call rocks "interesting" yeah plenty!

One of my own key ambitions, as a sailor, is to never have a rock named after me

FB- Doug

Well, I do have one - named at least by the locals, if not the Canadian CG. 

Un-marked pinnacle that is 8' down at low tide, in the approach to Winter Harbor in Quatsino Sound, west coast of Vancouver Island.  Nailed it reaching at 9 knots when surrounded by four other, larger boats who just missed it.  It's charted neighbor is called "Danger Rock".  Go figure.

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1 hour ago, fufkin said:

 

The general area has lots of old shipwrecks and is popular with divers.

A depth sounder is obviously a requirement  but either studying the charts in advance or just knowing the area well even better. 7-10 ft of water with sand and then a big boulder or shoal just under/slightly above  the water is not uncommon. As a buddy of mine up near 12 Mile Bay says, ‘Keeps the riff-raff out’

They have pretty good small craft routes marked w buoys in some of the more commonly used but treacherous inland areas. Best to go slow and stay within the marks!

Those things have the delightful name of "glacial erratics".

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2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Well, I do have one - named at least by the locals, if not the Canadian CG. 

Un-marked pinnacle that is 8' down at low tide, in the approach to Winter Harbor in Quatsino Sound, west coast of Vancouver Island.  Nailed it reaching at 9 knots when surrounded by four other, larger boats who just missed it.  It's charted neighbor is called "Danger Rock".  Go figure.

Unmarked or uncharted

 

One's eggregiously yr fault the other less so

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On 7/23/2020 at 12:07 PM, Breamerly said:

look let's just keep this civil and focus on the real topic at hand: the importance of laying a kedge

Anna Kedge was a very, very good friend of mine once upon a time...

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1 minute ago, Remodel said:

Anna Kedge was a very, very good friend of mine once upon a time...

In Arabic if I said I knew how to law a kedge and you said, "Anna kedge," that would be quite the come-on. Just sayin.

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Just now, Breamerly said:

In Arabic if I said I knew how to law a kedge and you said, "Anna kedge," that would be quite the come-on. Just sayin.

Oh, she was ;-)

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7 hours ago, Breamerly said:

Unmarked or uncharted

 

One's eggregiously yr fault the other less so

Well, technically un-marked.  But it's a little bit of the wild west out there.

The problem was that the navigational marks that are supposed to be out there, on the two largest reefs, have a history of not staying put or just going missing.  They are plunked on top of pinnacles, completely exposed to Pacific swells and storms (These are NOT wimpy meteorological events.), and often go walk-about.  That day, other than being "not to close, but not too far" from the lighthouse, we had nothing to way-find by.  We were the unlucky ones in the middle of a cluster of 40 boats setting up for a race start.  

When we hit "our" pinnacle, which was roughly only 15' in diameter, 7' - 10' down, and surrounded by 20 fathoms of water, I was on deck with paper charts in hand, binoculars in hand, GPS running and Navionics on my iPhone (which only worked when a couple of 100' from the lightkeeper's residence) and depthsounder running.  I couldn't find anything to get a bearing on in the PNW typical haze because the marks simply weren't there.

 

 

The result of our bang was motoring 300 NM back to civilization with a questionable keel and a serious visit to Betz' shop in Anacortes.

So maybe not so "egregious".

I've been going on too much about this incident, but sometimes "unmarked" is the right answer.

Best of luck to the new OP boat owner.  Go sailing.  Get a depthsounder anyway.

IMG_3816.PNG

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On 7/23/2020 at 7:44 PM, Grrr... said:

Do us all a favor.  Don't fix it up.  Go out and sail it till in sinks.  Too many new sailors start fixing their boats and realize that it's expensive as hell then quit.  Instead of just sailing what they have for fun.  Enjoy what you have.  It looks like fun.

This isn't said enough.

As long as the boat can move in and out of the marina under it's own power, the only maintenance you should ever do on a sailboat in the first five years should be to limit the amount of water coming in to the boat so that it is slower than the speed at which the bilge pump can push it back out again.

it's a lot less painful to run into the dock at full speed because your transmission cable failed when you didn't just repaint the whole boat. And a thousand other things that can/will go wrong.

Sail more. Plug leaks with chewing gum. Refloat as necessary.

That said, LED running lights are a wise investment at about $20 each, you'll roughly triple the life you can get out of the onboard battery.

Cool boat. My first boat was 34'. I wish I'd bought a 27 footer or similar. Everything for a 34' costs about double what it does on a 27'.

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Those Pearson 26's are built like tanks - solid glass both deck and hull, right team? 

You will look back on that boat as the best you ever owned. 

And they like bigger air - perfect for the lee shore of Lake Huron 

We have three of them at our club on Erie - they are indestructible 

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Indestructible forever

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On 7/25/2020 at 11:11 PM, Left Shift said:

Well, technically un-marked.  But it's a little bit of the wild west out there.

The problem was that the navigational marks that are supposed to be out there, on the two largest reefs, have a history of not staying put or just going missing.  They are plunked on top of pinnacles, completely exposed to Pacific swells and storms (These are NOT wimpy meteorological events.), and often go walk-about.  That day, other than being "not to close, but not too far" from the lighthouse, we had nothing to way-find by.  We were the unlucky ones in the middle of a cluster of 40 boats setting up for a race start.  

When we hit "our" pinnacle, which was roughly only 15' in diameter, 7' - 10' down, and surrounded by 20 fathoms of water, I was on deck with paper charts in hand, binoculars in hand, GPS running and Navionics on my iPhone (which only worked when a couple of 100' from the lightkeeper's residence) and depthsounder running.  I couldn't find anything to get a bearing on in the PNW typical haze because the marks simply weren't there.

 

 

The result of our bang was motoring 300 NM back to civilization with a questionable keel and a serious visit to Betz' shop in Anacortes.

So maybe not so "egregious".

I've been going on too much about this incident, but sometimes "unmarked" is the right answer.

Best of luck to the new OP boat owner.  Go sailing.  Get a depthsounder anyway.

IMG_3816.PNG

On the plus side:

Suddenly, you did not need those bearings or that fix. You KNEW exactly where you were!

FB- Doug

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17 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

On the plus side:

Suddenly, you did not need those bearings or that fix. You KNEW exactly where you were!

FB- Doug

As our navigator said on one Hawaii race when the crew kept bugging him about "Where are we?", he pointed to the cabin sole and said, "We're right here."

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On 7/25/2020 at 10:11 PM, Left Shift said:

  That day, other than being "not to close, but not too far" from the lighthouse, we had nothing to way-find by.  We were the unlucky ones in the middle of a cluster of 40 boats setting up for a race start.  
 

I love it when PRO's setup start lines with obstacles in them...     got one guy that likes to setup the boat end about 30 yards from shore, (we're on a lake) , but still a clusterfuck ...    other times we have logs sticking up, c'mon it's not that hard to look around before dropping the anchor..

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14 hours ago, Hadlock said:

This isn't said enough.

As long as the boat can move in and out of the marina under it's own power, the only maintenance you should ever do on a sailboat in the first five years should be to limit the amount of water coming in to the boat so that it is slower than the speed at which the bilge pump can push it back out again.

it's a lot less painful to run into the dock at full speed because your transmission cable failed when you didn't just repaint the whole boat. And a thousand other things that can/will go wrong.

Sail more. Plug leaks with chewing gum. Refloat as necessary.

That said, LED running lights are a wise investment at about $20 each, you'll roughly triple the life you can get out of the onboard battery.

Cool boat. My first boat was 34'. I wish I'd bought a 27 footer or similar. Everything for a 34' costs about double what it does on a 27'.

'

That said, LED running lights are a wise investment at about $20 each, you'll roughly triple the life you can get out of the onboard battery.

Cool boat. My first boat was 34'. I wish I'd bought a 27 footer or similar. Everything for a 34' costs about double what it does on a 27'.'

 

thanks for the advice! will put led on my wishlist...

looked at bigger boats... then buying a 26 ft... amazing amount of money when looking at the current wishlist... (about 3 times what i paid for the boat...)

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Nice boat

I had a 74  One design Pearson for 8 years as my first monohull.

Great boat to learn on.

Simple and as stated built like a brick house.   

Have been T-boned by a Catalina 27 and its bruce anchor at full tilt when they could not release the mainsheet trying to take our stern and rounded right up right behind the chain plates.  Had if fixed in 2 days.

 

The bearings do wear out if you like a tight feel.  You want the black delrin units.  I also used to make shims from coffee can lids to get rid of all the slop in the tiller.

Anything for a Pearson can be had from D&R in Assonet Mass   https://drmarine.com/products.asp?cat=290

Also as stated, a Danforth anchor is fine as long as you have some chain.

It will take a blow. Have raced her in the aftermath of a hurricane where we launched off a wave and got the keel and rudder out of the ocean.

You swallow hard, but she took it.

It does not like motoring in rough stuff as the prop will continuously come out of the water making it difficult to make way in winds over 25 knots.

Make sure you close the gas tank vent when in nasty stuff so the gas does not slosh on the cockpit deck.

 

Keep the electronics simple as you really are not going to have a lot of juice from the alternator of that outboard.

Best to supplement with a small solar panel.

Depth sounder is a good idea.  A small handheld gps with paper charts will get the job done

Besides the Windex, put telltales on the sails and learn to use them.

Check the hoses between the scuppers and through hull.  If  they are starting to get soft or rotten, replace them as it is cheap insurance from sinking.

If the front hatch is leaking, add a layer of rubber foam seal to the bottom of it to make it waterproof again. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-King-E-O-3-4-in-x-3-16-in-17-ft-Brown-Vinyl-Foam-Weather-Seal-Self-Stick-Tape-V449BH/10011845

Do not do stupid stuff like add a wheel or a dodger/bimini.   Learn the boat and increase your skills. In a couple years you can sell it for what you paid for it when you ready to move up to something a bit more complex.

 

PM me if you have questions

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On 7/26/2020 at 10:35 PM, Hadlock said:

This isn't said enough.

As long as the boat can move in and out of the marina under it's own power, the only maintenance you should ever do on a sailboat in the first five years should be to limit the amount of water coming in to the boat so that it is slower than the speed at which the bilge pump can push it back out again.

it's a lot less painful to run into the dock at full speed because your transmission cable failed when you didn't just repaint the whole boat. And a thousand other things that can/will go wrong.

Sail more. Plug leaks with chewing gum. Refloat as necessary.

That said, LED running lights are a wise investment at about $20 each, you'll roughly triple the life you can get out of the onboard battery.

Cool boat. My first boat was 34'. I wish I'd bought a 27 footer or similar. Everything for a 34' costs about double what it does on a 27'.

 

Having an issue with the motor that I plan on resolving by the weekend, it's a long weekend coming up here and want to get out sailing!

LED lights are on order, will put up a small solar panel to keep the battery charged, I'm moving to an unserviced dock shortly to save some bucks.

On 7/26/2020 at 10:53 PM, AJ Oliver said:

Those Pearson 26's are built like tanks - solid glass both deck and hull, right team? 

You will look back on that boat as the best you ever owned. 

And they like bigger air - perfect for the lee shore of Lake Huron 

We have three of them at our club on Erie - they are indestructible 

It sure does seem solid, I was under the cockpit through the lazarette last time I was there, fished an old tire(fender?) out of there. Had a good look around, no water to be seen :) 

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4 minutes ago, Gybe Talker said:

It sure does seem solid,  :) 

They are some of the most rugged sailboats ever built. 

Notice I said nothing about speediness 

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15 hours ago, Foreverslow said:

Nice boat

I had a 74  One design Pearson for 8 years as my first monohull.

Great boat to learn on.

Simple and as stated built like a brick house.   

Have been T-boned by a Catalina 27 and its bruce anchor at full tilt when they could not release the mainsheet trying to take our stern and rounded right up right behind the chain plates.  Had if fixed in 2 days.

 

The bearings do wear out if you like a tight feel.  You want the black delrin units.  I also used to make shims from coffee can lids to get rid of all the slop in the tiller.

Anything for a Pearson can be had from D&R in Assonet Mass   https://drmarine.com/products.asp?cat=290

Also as stated, a Danforth anchor is fine as long as you have some chain.

It will take a blow. Have raced her in the aftermath of a hurricane where we launched off a wave and got the keel and rudder out of the ocean.

You swallow hard, but she took it.

It does not like motoring in rough stuff as the prop will continuously come out of the water making it difficult to make way in winds over 25 knots.

Make sure you close the gas tank vent when in nasty stuff so the gas does not slosh on the cockpit deck.

 

Keep the electronics simple as you really are not going to have a lot of juice from the alternator of that outboard.

Best to supplement with a small solar panel.

Depth sounder is a good idea.  A small handheld gps with paper charts will get the job done

Besides the Windex, put telltales on the sails and learn to use them.

Check the hoses between the scuppers and through hull.  If  they are starting to get soft or rotten, replace them as it is cheap insurance from sinking.

If the front hatch is leaking, add a layer of rubber foam seal to the bottom of it to make it waterproof again. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-King-E-O-3-4-in-x-3-16-in-17-ft-Brown-Vinyl-Foam-Weather-Seal-Self-Stick-Tape-V449BH/10011845

Do not do stupid stuff like add a wheel or a dodger/bimini.   Learn the boat and increase your skills. In a couple years you can sell it for what you paid for it when you ready to move up to something a bit more complex.

 

PM me if you have questions

Wow, thanks for the informative reply, much appreciated! Will keep electronics simple, for the time being I'm just out on the lake in sight of land until I get more experience. Checking  all hoses and through hulls is next job. PM incoming, thanks.

 

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5 minutes ago, AJ Oliver said:

They are some of the most rugged sailboats ever built. 

Notice I said nothing about speediness 

At this point I'm happy to have a boat of my own, rugged over speed is fine with me for now!

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On 7/23/2020 at 5:28 PM, Left Shift said:

Danforths (if it is in fact a real Danforth and not a knock-off) are excellent anchors for the likely sandy/gravelly/muddy bottom you probably will be sailing over and anchoring in.  Lighter than the other options and quite appropriate for a 26' boat.  They need 15' of chain on a swivel and they are happy.  Just put your hand on the rode when reversing and you can feel it dig in.  

Yeah, this has been tested and is questionable. I don't want to thread-jack gybetalker here into (yet another, interminable) argument about anchors, but I think there's a fair bit of evidence that Danforths are not great at resetting after a big veer. Don't have the PS anchor test to hand but can certainly say that the last 3 or 4 vessels I've seen drag ashore have had a danforth at the end of their rode, and broke free on a tide change.

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3 hours ago, Breamerly said:

Yeah, this has been tested and is questionable. I don't want to thread-jack gybetalker here into (yet another, interminable) argument about anchors, but I think there's a fair bit of evidence that Danforths are not great at resetting after a big veer. Don't have the PS anchor test to hand but can certainly say that the last 3 or 4 vessels I've seen drag ashore have had a danforth at the end of their rode, and broke free on a tide change.

Used Danforths all my (rather long) life living in an area with 14' tide changes and had I've had one break free.  Turns out I had set right at the edge of an underwater bluff and the bluff edge decided gravity was its friend.  Other than that, many happy nights.  No more thread drift.

OP:  Go get those LED lights and a depth sounder!

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53 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Used Danforths all my (rather long) life living in an area with 14' tide changes and had I've had one break free.  Turns out I had set right at the edge of an underwater bluff and the bluff edge decided gravity was its friend.  Other than that, many happy nights.  No more thread drift.

OP:  Go get those LED lights and a depth sounder!

Well. I also live in Seattle and have watched two boats drag them ashore but as they say anecdotes ain't data. I hope OP reads a couple anchor tests and makes up his own mind.

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Ah, a local boat maker (RI).....

Call me nostalgic but I look at the original marketing materials for these and similar boats and lament the loss of the middle class. It was very typical for a MA or CT working family (like working on an assembly line, or for the post office, etc.) to buy these boats new and use them as their "2nd home" on the weekends. 

They had the time. They had the money. They enjoyed themselves. 

From my experience, this doesn't exist any longer to any degree. 

We elders are often accused of waxing poetic about the past - guilty as charged even tho my dad usually did the weekends in a small cabin cruiser. 

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