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danstanford

Drying out spinnaker?

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First time launching the spinnaker on the new boat last night and we ended up with a portion of the foot in the water. I left it laid out below in the boat with the hatch cracked but wondering what you Guys do to get it dried out besides going for a sail?

Dan

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2 hours ago, danstanford said:

First time launching the spinnaker on the new boat last night and we ended up with a portion of the foot in the water. I left it laid out below in the boat with the hatch cracked but wondering what you Guys do to get it dried out besides going for a sail?

Dan

If the wind is not honking, hoist it to the downwind side of the mast. Might have to use the main halyard. Let the third corner fly free, pull the hoist fairly tight so it doesn't flog back & forth, but flutters like a flag. If you're in salt water, hose it down to get the salt out.

On the way in from racing, I used to fly the spinnaker by the clew (letting the head fly free) so it would be dry when we got back to the dock.

It works to dry lines, also. Stowing gear wet really makes the boat unpleasant down below and shortens the gear's life.

Dehumidifier really helps too

FB- Doug

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my Yacht Club's flag pole :ph34r: when no one is around

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1 hour ago, 10thTonner said:

Just don’t take it down. 

Let God take it down....

except for those rare occasions when you need a Samurai Douse

FB- Doug

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Letting it flog from the mast is one of the fastest way to wreck the sail.  Many years ago at a Swan regatta at Cowes our neighbour hoisted his kite to dry it.  Within a couple of seconds it had taken a turn round another boat's masthead ripped the antenna, wind wand and the tricolour off.  The sail was shredded too.  We could see the offending crew arguing as to who was going to tell the owner what had happened.

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Once wetted with salt water it never actually dries until you remove the salt. IOW don’t worry about it too much. 

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

If the wind is not honking, hoist it to the downwind side of the mast. Might have to use the main halyard. Let the third corner fly free, pull the hoist fairly tight so it doesn't flog back & forth, but flutters like a flag. If you're in salt water, hose it down to get the salt out.

On the way in from racing, I used to fly the spinnaker by the clew (letting the head fly free) so it would be dry when we got back to the dock.

It works to dry lines, also. Stowing gear wet really makes the boat unpleasant down below and shortens the gear's life.

Dehumidifier really helps too

FB- Doug

Your sail maker loves you. He really does. It's not 1968 anymore.

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9 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Once wetted with salt water it never actually dries until you remove the salt. IOW don’t worry about it too much. 

One of the benefits of sailing on Lake Ontario.  Unsalted and shark free.

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+1 for dehumidifier.

I typically take mine home and pull it out of the bag with a dehumidifer and oscillating fan nearby.

Turn the heap over every couple of hours exposing the wet parts.

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29 minutes ago, Whinging Pom said:

Letting it flog from the mast is one of the fastest way to wreck the sail.  Many years ago at a Swan regatta at Cowes our neighbour hoisted his kite to dry it.  Within a couple of seconds it had taken a turn round another boat's masthead ripped the antenna, wind wand and the tricolour off.  The sail was shredded too.  We could see the offending crew arguing as to who was going to tell the owner what had happened.

Did I say "let it flog from the mast"? Maybe my instructions were not explicit and precise enough. I should have said "be careful to not have another boat very close to leeward so your spinnaker snags in their rigging."

I also did not say "Leave it up for hours in a strong wind."

 

13 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Once wetted with salt water it never actually dries until you remove the salt. IOW don’t worry about it too much. 

Depends on where you live, and whether you like mildew... and

 

6 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

Your sail maker loves you. He really does. It's not 1968 anymore.

Salt is a crystal. Leaving it on the stitching and seams will cut into them and shorten the life of the sail.

In other words, rinsing and properly drying sails... and line... is simply good care and will repay your work with a nicer boat interior and slightly longer life for the sails... they'll lose shape before coming apart from salt, but why rush it. Line OTOH benefits more, and holds a surprising amount of moisture.

Of course you all are free think I'm full of shit. Drag your sails behind your car down a gravel road, if you wish. Pics or it didn't happen!

;)

FB- Doug

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32 minutes ago, Tax Man said:

One of the benefits of sailing on Lake Ontario.  Unsalted and shark free.

Isn’t that two?

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5 hours ago, Tax Man said:

Dehumidifier.

This ^^^^

Leave them lose in the bag and seal up the boat with a dehu running.   Leave your wet rinsed gear down below as well, next morning it all dry.  

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 Save the flogging for the crew. Hoist upside down with the clews together, like snap halyard through both. Stable, doesn’t flog and easier to douse without shrimping again. 

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does a dehumidifier work better than AC for dehumidifying? pretty much the same as far as i know.

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6 minutes ago, Mark Set said:

does a dehumidifier work better than AC for dehumidifying? pretty much the same as far as i know.

May not be better, but  cheaper and much lighter to lug up and down the companionway ladder.

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39 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

 Save the flogging for the crew. Hoist upside down with the clews together, like snap halyard through both. Stable, doesn’t flog and easier to douse without shrimping again. 

Why hoist upside down?

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In our area (Gulf Coast) dehumidifier works all year round, advantage will keep boat warm in winter. Disadvantage is keeps boat warm in summer.  If you allow them to run constantly there is a risk the boat will shrink (jk).  Best to have it drain into sink, no danger of bilge pump failure plus will dry out the bilge.

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i know a person who not only uses the sauna at home to cure carbon.... (it's at a lower temp also perfect for sails...)

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Why hoist upside down?

Keeps it stable. I’d guess you get smooth flow out the top instead of shedding vortices off alternating sides / oscillating and tearing shit up

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God rest his soul, one gentleman I used to sail with would say "just leave it out and I'll send [my wife] down tomorrow morning with a hair dryer."

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On 7/31/2020 at 10:30 PM, daan62 said:

i know a person who not only uses the sauna at home to cure carbon.... (it's at a lower temp also perfect for sails...)

Cool! I always wanted to do a low-temperature duck in mine but I‘m afraid the smell wouldn’t get out. :o 

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Only rinse with freshwater if you are 100% certain that it will be completely dried afterwards.  Salt crystal damage is pretty minimal in very light cloth and salt actually prevents mildew growth very well.  Full rinse and dry is best.  Mildew is not your friend especially in coated spinnaker nylon.

Re: hoisting and drying that way...  Only in lighter winds and definitely keep the 'leading edge' side tensioned.  In the textile industry we purposely test cloth on a flutter machine, and you'd be shocked at how damaging even 3 minutes of freely luffing cloth is to bias stability at 25kts, even to the best finishes known to man.

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45 minutes ago, nlmasopust said:

Only rinse with freshwater if you are 100% certain that it will be completely dried afterwards.  Salt crystal damage is pretty minimal in very light cloth and salt actually prevents mildew growth very well.  Full rinse and dry is best.  Mildew is not your friend especially in coated spinnaker nylon.

Re: hoisting and drying that way...  Only in lighter winds and definitely keep the 'leading edge' side tensioned.  In the textile industry we purposely test cloth on a flutter machine, and you'd be shocked at how damaging even 3 minutes of freely luffing cloth is to bias stability at 25kts, even to the best finishes known to man.

I disagree, I've seen sails with a rime of salt along the seams just pull apart. And salty anything will bloom mildew in a warm humid environment.

Not everywhere is as humid as it is here.

Completely agree on how/when to hoist, I would certainly not hoist a sail to dry it in 25 kt winds, or 20. Or leave it that way in less, they dry quick in even light wind and sun.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

I disagree, I've seen sails with a rime of salt along the seams just pull apart. And salty anything will bloom mildew in a warm humid environment.

Not everywhere is as humid as it is here.

Completely agree on how/when to hoist, I would certainly not hoist a sail to dry it in 25 kt winds, or 20. Or leave it that way in less, they dry quick in even light wind and sun.

FB- Doug

Don't mean to mince words with someone I respect a lot on here, but I sail in SE Asia, have 2 spinnakers of coated nylon, ridden hard and put away wet for 3 and 4 years respectively.  They live inside the cabin of my 25' keelboat. Temps and humidity here make where you live a paradise.  365 days a year as well.  They still handily win races when trimmed and handled well.

Exactly how old were these sails that fell apart at the seams?  Was UV exposure an issue?  That is yuuuuuuuge, much bigger factor than any small crystalline structures in a nylon or polyester weave or thread.

Wayyyyyyyy back in the day, Ted Hood actually tried putting fine particles of silicone dioxide (silica sand) in Dacron finish formula...  The theory is the rough texture of the substrate bites into adjacent fibers and provides increased friction, and thus better bias stability.  I can't imagine dried salt particles would be much different.   It did work.  But melamine on well-prepared goods works better.  Even in spinnaker cloth, but I think coatings, while less environmentally friendly, are better and generally last longer.

Okay okay, spinnaker cloth is a little different, but most spinnakers are well past racing use by the time salt could impact cloth or thread enough to degrade strength appreciably IMHO.

For you cruisers, yeah, rinse your stuff and let it dry completely.   You're a cruiser after all, you expect 20 years out of your sails and you have plenty of time on your hands, right?  ;)

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5 minutes ago, nlmasopust said:

Don't mean to mince words with someone I respect a lot on here, but I sail in SE Asia, have 2 spinnakers of coated nylon, ridden hard and put away wet for 3 and 4 years respectively.  They live inside the cabin of my 25' keelboat. Temps and humidity here make where you live a paradise.  365 days a year as well.  They still handily win races when trimmed and handled well.

Exactly how old were these sails that fell apart at the seams?  Was UV exposure an issue?  That is yuuuuuuuge, much bigger factor than any small crystalline structures in a nylon or polyester weave or thread.

Wayyyyyyyy back in the day, Ted Hood actually tried putting fine particles of silicone dioxide (silica sand) in Dacron finish formula...  The theory is the rough texture of the substrate bites into adjacent fibers and provides increased friction, and thus better bias stability.  I can't imagine dried salt particles would be much different.   It did work.  But melamine on well-prepared goods works better.  Even in spinnaker cloth, but I think coatings, while less environmentally friendly, are better and generally last longer.

Okay okay, spinnaker cloth is a little different, but most spinnakers are well past racing use by the time salt could impact cloth or thread enough to degrade strength appreciably IMHO.

For you cruisers, yeah, rinse your stuff and let it dry completely.   You're a cruiser after all, you expect 20 years out of your sails and you have plenty of time on your hands, right?  ;)

Thank you, and likewise. I hesitate to disagree, but that's what I've seen happen.

The sail that I'm referring to was what we called then a balloon reacher, and it was stuffed wet several times due to needs to getting it the F! out of the way while racing. It lived with a whitish line along many of the seams for about a year (I did not own the boat) that I did not personally taste but looked exactly like salt dried on this you often see around things on the ocean. And I've noticed abraded stitching on other sails under other circumstances. Maybe I'm misconnecting the dots.

Mildew.... a sail put away wet with either salt or fresh water will have big black spots of mildew on it, the next time you get it out, here in the southeastern US. Maybe it's not the humidity alone but the abundance of spores.

I am pretty fussy about stuff, lucky to have been spoiled for so much of my life and have nice things... except for that one genoa with a footprint on it......

FB- Doug

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and remember, nylon dark colors use to "bleed" when wet, staining the light colors.

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My sail maker is pretty clear that modern cloths are pretty tolerant of most things apart from flogging. The cloth had a coating, and when is gone it's gone. Flog it and it'll be gone in no time.

It doesn't care about being wet. It's not cotton, it won't rot. It might go mouldy, which won't look nice but won't hurt it, it may well smell, but it won't care about that either.

Hanging it up to flap dry is a fucking disaster. Still there always one. Or occasionally two.

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If it's over sized, a clothes dryer.

That's what the Pro's do

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I have years of experience draping chutes over banisters, couches and coffee tables with good results.  It's a good conversation starter when you have company for dinner as well.  Of course, my lovely wife was never that impressed with the idea....

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8 hours ago, jesposito said:

If it's over sized, a clothes dryer.

That's what the Pro's do

and they do shrink. if nylons left on hi heat to long in the Dryer look out. 

 Popped one to the tapes, first set after a over sized chute was heat shrunk to rate smaller. OOPS

lve used docks ,fences, lawns, tables. foredecks, and of course people holding the thing to get air under it. Even fully bagged just the wet foot or clews out in the sun or below.

#1 "KEEP IT DRY" is often what the owners cry out as a chutes doused...

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29 minutes ago, Que said:

I have years of experience draping chutes over banisters, couches and coffee tables with good results.  It's a good conversation starter when you have company for dinner as well.  Of course, my lovely wife was never that impressed with the idea....

Tell her you're just channeling your inner Christo, let her know you're thinking of going bigger.

maxresdefault.jpg

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47 minutes ago, DRIFTW00D said:

 #1 "KEEP IT DRY" is often what the owners cry out as a chutes doused...

Did you call the Samurai douse!

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Whenever this question is raised it reminds me of an incident about 40 years ago.

I had at the time a VJ (11'6" decked over dinghy,  think an ironing board with a sloop rig and swinging boards over the side to sit on & ho;d it up).  The boat had had it's bowsprit broken and I had taken it to an old retired ex champion skiff sailor to be repaired.  When the job was done,  he got me to bring the mast & jib to his house so we could check everything was positioned correctly.

Now the jib on a VJ has about a 7' luff and less than 3' foot.  We raised the mast,  and sheeted the jib to check the tack position was right.

At which point the old guy turns to me and says,  "Don't hang your sails over the clothesline to dry them son. It ruins their shape."

I haven't hung a sail to dry since!

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11 hours ago, Teener said:
12 hours ago, DRIFTW00D said:

#1 "KEEP IT DRY" is often what the owners cry out as a chutes doused...

Did you call the Samurai douse!

Somebody had to do it

FB- Doug

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21 hours ago, jesposito said:

If it's over sized, a clothes dryer.

That's what the Pro's do

The problem is that most people forget to iron it afterwards. Wrinkles are slow. 

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On 8/4/2020 at 8:40 PM, Teener said:

Did you call the Samurai douse!

 

Dam you!  I Preformed the Cock of the Walk Series WINNING, samurai LAST FUCKING tack

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On 7/31/2020 at 6:11 AM, danstanford said:

First time launching the spinnaker on the new boat last night and we ended up with a portion of the foot in the water. I left it laid out below in the boat with the hatch cracked but wondering what you Guys do to get it dried out besides going for a sail?

Dan

If you don’t wash the salt off the sail it will never dry 

Salt is hygroscopic 

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fuck me......

some of the replies!

First dont fly the kite while parked unless you love spending money, typically what I have done for years in my boat which is in race trim i.e. no squabs etc, is to spread it out from one end of the boat to the other draping it over everything exposing as much as possible. Turn on the dehumidifier and go home, option two with no dehumidifier and come back reshuffle it, empty the bilge etc. Occasionally when there is no wind whatsoever and its sunny, I will pull it out for the companionway and drape it over the boom etc but you need to be hanging around.

as for Slugs brilliant advice to wash sails............ jesus tittyfucking christ this forum is going to hell in a handbasket.

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On 8/4/2020 at 5:52 PM, DRIFTW00D said:

#1 "KEEP IT DRY" is often what the owners cry out as a chutes doused...

$$$$ ringing in my head.....  

 

Sigh.......

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