Gabe_nyc

Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

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My jib sheets sometimes get stuck under the shroud turnbuckles.

I bought the turnbuckle covers pictured since they were the only ones in stock nearby. The problem is that my mounting plate is a solid piece for both turnbuckles and there is no way to bring the covers down to the deck to keep the sheets getting stuck. Slitting this material would not be a good choice because, among other reasons, it's a fairly loose weave and it unravels easily.

My thought right now is to find some sheet rubber 1/8" or so thickness (maybe cut up a volleyball), punch some holes in the edges and lace it in position.

If anybody has any better ideas either about how to mount the covers I have now, or how to mount other ones, please let me know.

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You can get solid plastic turnbuckle covers, you then just rim off the bit where the two meet.

Either that or wrap the bottom of the turnbuckles with tape.

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Wedge something solid under there that you can shape to mostly fill the space.  Piece of wood, plastic, rubber, etc.  Cap from a 2 liter bottle maybe?  Then a few wraps of tape around the chainplate to hold it in place.

And rotate that clevis pin so the split pin isn't so stabby!

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3 hours ago, The Q said:

You can get solid plastic turnbuckle covers, you then just rim off the bit where the two meet.

Either that or wrap the bottom of the turnbuckles with tape.

Davis used to make solid plastic ones but no longer.

West Marine has some w aluminum tubes but they’re crazy-expensive and would be tough to trim.

I thought of wrapping with tape or line of some sort, but I figured that would retain water and possible corrode bits I don’t want corroded.

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bend the pin and tape it .

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2 hours ago, xyzzy said:

And rotate that clevis pin so the split pin isn't so stabby!

Than you — yes, that is on the menu. It’s a new boat (for me) and I’m still going over one thing and another for the first time.

The other thing I thought of is to insert a hard piece of solid nylon or something, sideways on the inboard side of the chainplate so that it keeps the jaws flush to the outside which is where the sheets get snagged.

 

65EEB2C6-8C68-4866-A5BC-E52146C406FE.jpeg

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Or nylon washers to center the pin on the chain plate

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9 minutes ago, mgs said:

Or nylon washers to center the pin on the chain plate

 

this is the best thought, no corrosion, looks clean and solves the problem . And its cheap. 

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13 minutes ago, mgs said:

Or nylon washers to center the pin on the chain plate

I don’t want to mess w the shrouds too much, but I might be able to put a slot in a nylon washer and slip it in position when the shroud is on the leeward side and unloaded.

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47 minutes ago, Gabe_nyc said:

I don’t want to mess w the shrouds too much, but I might be able to put a slot in a nylon washer and slip it in position when the shroud is on the leeward side and unloaded.

It’s pretty simple to count the turns you take off the turnbuckle to get the pin loose. Or you could measure the distance between the studs to get the same setting

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Plastic to fill the gap is best long term solution. You need the "fill' to extend down past the end of the toggle for best effect. I've used starboard to make inserts easily for this job. Cut a angle on the bit sticking down below the toggle to make the sheet slide past the toggle.

The clevis pin on the aft t/b has quite an angle - is it undersized for the chainplate hole?

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2 hours ago, crankcall said:

this is the best thought, no corrosion, looks clean and solves the problem . And its cheap. 

This is what I did for my to center the toggles on my chainplates.  But the angle is so great on that clevis that I wonder if there would be enough force to just crush nylon washers.  It also looks like moving the toggle to the center might be enough to change the effective length by half a turn.

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Despite its susceptibility to UV (making it brittle), this looks like a good place for PVC pipe rollers. The bottom sections of the pipes could be cut  half away where they would overlap, leaving a half-round forward and a half-round aft.  This would enable them to extend down all the way to the deck to keep lines from getting caught. The sheets and genoa should slide over the slippery plastic even if the "rollers" don't roll. ABS plastic pipe holds up better outside, but black might not pass the aesthetic committee.  

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Another option that works.  Make a flat U shaped puck of starboard that sits on top of the beauty plate and under the toggles.  Slide it in place from front to back and make sure toggle is not touching it.  This narrows the gap and prevents line snag under the toggle.  Two small holes in the back of the U so you can lash the opening closed around the end of the chainplate so it stays in place.  

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12 hours ago, The Q said:

Either that or wrap the bottom of the turnbuckles with tape.

I was thinking tie a piece of line the same diameter as your sheets there.  Simple, and should work.

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Best looking turnbuckle covers I ever saw were elkhide on a Swan.

The same stuff wheels are wrapped with.

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4 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

I was thinking tie a piece of line the same diameter as your sheets there.  Simple, and should work.

That might work, but the knot is going to be hard to tie in a piece that short.  The line will also pick up dirt like crazy.  A piece of semi-stiff hose might work better.  You could perhaps put hose-end fittings on each end and screw them together quite neatly.  

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3 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

why don't you install a couple of these, $6 and you're done..

I’m not sure where / how you are suggesting that these be installed ...

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dont do that if it affects sheeting angle.  Simplest solution, get a bit of 10mm plastic hose wrap it round the base  and tape it. Job done in 5 minutes. the neatest way is remove the rigging and put a bit of hdpe with a slot over it 

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13 hours ago, toad said:

dont do that if it affects sheeting angle.  Simplest solution, get a bit of 10mm plastic hose wrap it round the base  and tape it. Job done in 5 minutes. the neatest way is remove the rigging and put a bit of hdpe with a slot over it 

well the turnbuckles have already fucked the sheeting angle..   place the leads right next to the turnbuckles..         or how about something easy, like run the lines inside the turnbuckles?        it's hard to see from one closeup pic wth is going on... I'm sure the boat wasn't designed to have the sheets run under the turnbuckles..

 

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31 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

well the turnbuckles have already fucked the sheeting angle..   place the leads right next to the turnbuckles..         or how about something easy, like run the lines inside the turnbuckles?        it's hard to see from one closeup pic wth is going on... I'm sure the boat wasn't designed to have the sheets run under the turnbuckles..

 

agree, its seems odd

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Just wrap the whole mess with etape.

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On 8/22/2020 at 5:30 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

or how about something easy, like run the lines inside the turnbuckles?        it's hard to see from one closeup pic wth is going on... I'm sure the boat wasn't designed to have the sheets run under the turnbuckles..

No need to run the sheets inside the turnbuckles - that would be even more trouble.

Here is a shot down the length of the deck.

What I did the day first posted is to wrap 2 of those goofy covers horizontally and hold them in place with tie-wraps.

It worked but it was pretty silly-looking and that’s why I asked about a better solution from the hive mind.

70B99904-C916-4C59-B2B8-0FB0BD95FCA6.jpeg

B8119B07-0411-40C0-9DC8-1C682A148B16.jpeg

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Scrap fire hose. Cut with hot knife or rope cutter. Burn lacing holes or stitch by hand. Different colors available.

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Why wouldn't you just run the sheet inside the chain plates?

If the sheet then rubs on the side of the coach house put a fairlead on the vertical face of the coach house in a suitable position to stop it from rubbing on the coach house.

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Because if the jib is anything larger than 100% it's clew is already past the shrouds when sheeted on, requiring it to sheet outside the shrouds.

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17 minutes ago, See Level said:

Because if the jib is anything larger than 100% it's clew is already past the shrouds when sheeted on, requiring it to sheet outside the shrouds.

Yup

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If you only want to focus on the problem right at deck level, you could get two thick pieces of wood. Ipé or teak would be nice. Cut or carve out the insides in a C shape to make a clamshell that the shrouds/chainplates fit through, and then screw or tape the two halves together.  Rounding the tops would help keep the sheets from snagging.  Much neater than the "dirty socks" look you will have going on shortly.  If you can't find thick pieces of nice wood you could make a box out of smaller pieces glued & screwed together. 

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29 minutes ago, PaulK said:

Much neater than the "dirty socks" look you will have going on shortly. 

I prefer to think of it as “clean socks” ... (:-)

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What my next attempt will be is to insert large nylon washers on the inboard side of the pin so as to keep the clevis flush with the chainplate.

This would be unobtrusive and it would make it impossible for the sheets to snag.

I am hoping that this works, and will decide afterward whether to also cover the turnbuckles further.

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3 hours ago, Gabe_nyc said:

What my next attempt will be is to insert large nylon washers on the inboard side of the pin so as to keep the clevis flush with the chainplate.

This would be unobtrusive and it would make it impossible for the sheets to snag.

I am hoping that this works, and will decide afterward whether to also cover the turnbuckles further.

Certainly seems like the obvious solution.

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On 8/27/2020 at 10:17 AM, Gabe_nyc said:

What my next attempt will be is to insert large nylon washers on the inboard side of the pin so as to keep the clevis flush with the chainplate.

At this point in the season I did not want to disconnect the shrouds or do anything else where I might drop a clevis pin over the side etc.

I got some large washers, cut a slot in them with a razor saw (easily the most dangerous tool I own) (:-) and pushed them in place.

The slot is sized so that determined effort is required to push them in position. There is some theoretical chance that they might get squeezed out but I doubt it.

There is a bit of slop left in the clevis and the pin might push out a little again, but I don’t think it will be enough to snag anything.

011CC479-F3C9-4254-A952-67E4535A4F1A.jpeg

85278A9E-7B64-4B87-A4CF-BB2F897CADDF.jpeg

8809410F-5F94-4D1C-AA59-90DA445A3563.jpeg

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On 9/6/2020 at 1:57 AM, Gabe_nyc said:

 

8809410F-5F94-4D1C-AA59-90DA445A3563.jpeg

Might it be better if the washers were on both sides?  Looks like you're point loading the chainplate & clevis pin.  I used steel washers (up to six) to true up the shackle so there's no athwartships play.  Of course, the shrouds have be slacked so you can remove the clevis pin to get washers on.  It's hard to see but are you bending the cotter pin greater than 15°?  A no-no as it work hardens the cotter pin more than necessary.   I know the cotter pin should be installed head up but  I rotate the pin until the ends are flush against the shackle cheek and "glue" the ends of the cotter pin with a dab of clear silicone to the shackle, which eliminates stuff catching on the cotter pin, including foot flesh :o.

A long as you've got the shackle open it's handy to install a SS ring above the clevis pin in the shackle for tying off external halyards when at the slip to eliminate slap, etc., and as a hard point for other loads like dinghy tiedowns.  Concerning turnbuckle covers,  none on my boat;  they retain moisture and make regular visual inspection difficult.

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On 8/27/2020 at 9:53 AM, See Level said:

Because if the jib is anything larger than 100% it's clew is already past the shrouds when sheeted on, requiring it to sheet outside the shrouds.

 

On 8/27/2020 at 10:11 AM, Gabe_nyc said:

Yup

Nup

My 135% Genoa sheets just fine between the shrouds on the wind, makes a huge difference to pointing.

Its only when the leech hits the spreaders that you can't do it. Switch to outside sheeting as I drop off, then sheet to rail as drop further.

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14 minutes ago, BOI Guy said:

Nup

My 135% Genoa sheets just fine between the shrouds on the wind, makes a huge difference to pointing.

Its only when the leech hits the spreaders that you can't do it. Switch to outside sheeting as I drop off, then sheet to rail as drop further.

That would seem impossible. Free-standing or spreaderless mast? Extreme fractional rig? What is your trick?

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3 hours ago, axolotl said:

Might it be better if the washers were on both sides?

I started this whole thread trying to get the clevis flush on the outside so the jib sheets won’t hang up.

3 hours ago, axolotl said:

Of course, the shrouds have be slacked so you can remove the clevis pin to get washers on.  It's hard to see but are you bending the cotter pin greater than 15°?  A no-no as it work hardens the cotter pin more than necessary. 

All good points, but I did not want, and did not, touch the turnbuckles, the clevis pins or the cotter pins.

I gently eased the clevis pins to one side with a large screwdriver when they were unloaded on the lee side, cut slots in the washers (see pics) and slipped the slotted washers over the pins.

Quick, easy and zero chance of mishap.

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9 hours ago, BOI Guy said:

 

Nup

My 135% Genoa sheets just fine between the shrouds on the wind, makes a huge difference to pointing.

Its only when the leech hits the spreaders that you can't do it. Switch to outside sheeting as I drop off, then sheet to rail as drop further.

If love to see a picture of that.

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Not going to be able to do a photo for quiet a while but try picture this. 

Clew goes inside shroud but outside diagonal, fractional rig. I've sailed a few boats that have done it. Not sure what's so impossible about it?

Next time you crank the genoa hard around the shroud have a look at how much triangle fits inside it before you hit the spreader. 

Shroud base and track sort of have to be in right alignment but not that unusual I thought. 

 

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On 9/7/2020 at 8:22 PM, Gabe_nyc said:

All good points, but I did not want, and did not, touch the turnbuckles, the clevis pins or the cotter pins.

 

On 8/19/2020 at 9:42 AM, Gabe_nyc said:

I don’t want to mess w the shrouds too much, but I might be able to put a slot in a nylon washer and slip it in position when the shroud is on the leeward side and unloaded.

Gabe, I am detecting a profound, and perhaps abnormal reluctance on your part to loosen the shrouds so that you can insert a full nylon washer around the clevis pin. This may be a phobia. I went through the same thing with my last boat. I really did not want to loosen the turn buckles because I would then have to tighten them, and when it came to the rig and tuning it, I was a lost sheep.

Just remember, we are here for you. :P

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5 hours ago, Bull City said:

 

Gabe, I am detecting a profound, and perhaps abnormal reluctance on your part to loosen the shrouds so that you can insert a full nylon washer around the clevis pin. This may be a phobia. I went through the same thing with my last boat. I really did not want to loosen the turn buckles because I would then have to tighten them, and when it came to the rig and tuning it, I was a lost sheep.

Just remember, we are here for you. :P

I appreciate the willingness to help. 

1 - this season had a very late season start

2 - I had a few other bigger projects before splashing

3 - I am a bit of COVID refugee and temporarily much further from the boat than previous

4 - if you look at the screws holding the plates to the deck you will see that they are somewhat mismatched and not 100% square.

————

So here is my decidedly non-phobic summing up of all relevant factors:

I’ve done my share of crawling in the bilge etc for this season (see some of my other threads). If I can avoid doing something until after haul-out, I will do so. 

I will not be doing too much sailing from now through the end of the season. Just like work/life balance is a thing, sail/work balance is a thing too (:-)

There is internal evidence of past leaks around the chainplates. They are dry right now, but the sloppy screw heads warn me that a proverbial can of worms may well  await there.

I am profoundly envious off all those who have never had “a small thing” turn into “a big thing” at a time and place that was ... ahem ... inopportune. Alas, I have not been as fortunate, and because of that, I have learned to (sometimes) exercise discretion before plunging along with minor-but-optional jobs.

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4 hours ago, Gabe_nyc said:

4 - if you look at the screws holding the plates to the deck you will see that they are somewhat mismatched and not 100% square.

Not sure why that matters?  The deck plate just covers the hole by which the chainplates pass through the deck.  It has zero function as standing rigging.  You can take your shrouds off without touching those screws or the plates.  If the stress of having the shrouds loosened breaks some seal, then the stress of sailing would have long since done it already.

It's a 10 minute job to get the turnbuckle removed and put back on.  The only way it's going to stop you from sailing is if you discover something about the toggle or chainplate that you'll be glad you discovered at the dock and not while sailing.

 

 

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On 9/8/2020 at 12:20 AM, BOI Guy said:

Not going to be able to do a photo for quiet a while but try picture this. 

Clew goes inside shroud but outside diagonal, fractional rig. I've sailed a few boats that have done it. Not sure what's so impossible about it?

Next time you crank the genoa hard around the shroud have a look at how much triangle fits inside it before you hit the spreader. 

Shroud base and track sort of have to be in right alignment but not that unusual I thought. 

Lowest spreader near the hounds? That is an odd rig... No way does a 135% genoa trim under a spreader on any production rig. Geometry.

”Pics or it didn’t happen.”

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8 hours ago, xyzzy said:

If the stress of having the shrouds loosened breaks some seal, then the stress of sailing would have long since done it already.

That is a valid point. 

Nonetheless, I am pretty sure that my current solution will last at least until the end of the season, and I just do not see what there is to be gained at this point by buying all new unslotted washers and getting them installed in the limited time left.

Re my “reluctance” to mess with stuff, a couple of years ago I wanted to take off the deck-stepped mast on my previous boat (28-ft).

My yard does not have a crane so I made my own gin-pole to unstep / step the mast and it worked great even though I had found no instructions etc for making one.

Here is a picture of me and a few friends bringing it down (I am the good-looking one) (:-)

E44BDE41-368E-4C39-9490-BAE1AC98149C.png

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On 8/26/2020 at 12:38 PM, Gabe_nyc said:

No need to run the sheets inside the turnbuckles - that would be even more trouble.

Here is a shot down the length of the deck.

What I did the day first posted is to wrap 2 of those goofy covers horizontally and hold them in place with tie-wraps.

It worked but it was pretty silly-looking and that’s why I asked about a better solution from the hive mind.

70B99904-C916-4C59-B2B8-0FB0BD95FCA6.jpeg

B8119B07-0411-40C0-9DC8-1C682A148B16.jpeg

I see white tape that looks like it probably covers the ends of the safety wire on these turnbuckles. What are you using for tape in this spot? I need to do this on my Helms. 

 

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On 10/5/2020 at 10:59 AM, jbatstl said:

I see white tape that looks like it probably covers the ends of the safety wire on these turnbuckles. What are you using for tape in this spot? I need to do this on my Helms. 

 

Sorry, that was there from the previous owner.

I don’t know what he used and I haven’t had to use any myself.

On the other hand, the rubbery tape that bonds to itself when you stretch it would work pretty well there.

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The Genoa goes beyond the shrouds. The problem is the sheets catch when you tack. 
 

So.when you are on a starboard tack the port shrouds aren’t really doing anything but waiting to catch the sheet when you finally tack.

so... pull the port clevis pins and duct tape the shrouds  to the mast base.

When  you tack the sheet won't hang up

 

you are welcome 

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On 10/10/2020 at 10:58 AM, Gabe_nyc said:

Sorry, that was there from the previous owner.

I don’t know what he used and I haven’t had to use any myself.

On the other hand, the rubbery tape that bonds to itself when you stretch it would work pretty well there.

Thanks. I should be able to find some good tape for this. 

 

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On 10/10/2020 at 1:30 PM, Gouvernail said:

The Genoa goes beyond the shrouds. The problem is the sheets catch when you tack. 
 

So.when you are on a starboard tack the port shrouds aren’t really doing anything but waiting to catch the sheet when you finally tack.

so... pull the port clevis pins and duct tape the shrouds  to the mast base.

When  you tack the sheet won't hang up

 

you are welcome 

Thanks!

 

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28 minutes ago, jbatstl said:

Thanks. I should be able to find some good tape for this. 

 

Stretch's to conform, stays stuck good, easy to remove and comes off clean.

And is slippery so the sail doesn't chafe thru it so it's good for spreader tips as well.

3m-electrical-tapes-10828-dl-2w-64_1000.jpg

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On 10/10/2020 at 2:30 PM, Gouvernail said:

So when you are on a starboard tack the port shrouds aren’t really doing anything but waiting to catch the sheet when you finally tack.

so... pull the port clevis pins and duct tape the shrouds  to the mast base.

When  you tack the sheet won't hang up

you are welcome 

My mast is keel-stepped. 

If I reinforce it with some of the miraculous duct tape you speak of, don’t you think I might be able to dispense with these bothersome shrouds altogether?

At that point, in order not to over-stress the duct tape, it might behoove me to preferentially sail only on days with following winds, but that’s pretty much every day in Long Island Sound, so no biggie (:-)

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More seriously ... I really liked the plastic fender washers idea. 
in fact . 
Why  not take that a bit further.

and cheap! 
 

you could get one of those toll up plastic cutting boards and cut  a small piece. Drill a couple holes and stick the thing between the clevis pin heads and the forks. 
 

here is the finest piece of napkin mechanical drawing you may ever see!!! 

 

 

C57D9345-2417-4B81-8C3A-CA1FE86BA7F0.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

here is the finest piece of napkin mechanical drawing you may ever see!!! 

OMG!

First duct tape, and now napkins!

Are you from ... the future ?

(:-) (:-)

Seriously though, yes, I might do something more permanent if I finish my other projects (:-)

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11 hours ago, See Level said:

Stretch's to conform, stays stuck good, easy to remove and comes off clean.

And is slippery so the sail doesn't chafe thru it so it's good for spreader tips as well.

3m-electrical-tapes-10828-dl-2w-64_1000.jpg

That's it! Perfect. Thanks!

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Okay,  I had same sort of issue issue,  and just put in some washers on the inside of the pin to keep the head close,  worked pretty well  but still could get caught when the Gods were frowning on me or we REALLY needed a perfect tack.  However, I did also have a Plan B,  which while a little off the wall,  worked as well. Hear me out...  I made a piece of shock cord with clips on it that I attached to the shroud above the turnbuckle and stretched out to my toe rail, which has opening in it like yours,  the shock cord keeps the sheet from falling down there and causing hangup, I just take the shock off after racing.  Now,  yes, your 4 deck man might catch his foot on it and I think at time something else might catch that shock cord,  but the usual result is it just breaks and away you go.   Hey,  it worked at the time.  I don't do it anymore and I don't get that many catches, usually as I have a crew helping the sail around and it just works.    At some point I will fabricate something to fit in there to occupy the offending space.  The shock cord was just an idea and it worked pretty well.     

 

 

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Thanks for the pics. Okay, interesting geometric oddity that a 135 does not intersect the spreader...especially when led inboard.

Kinda by definition the common 110% LP headsail just clears the spreader. The 10% accounts for the leech hollow. It's just basic geometry. So a typical (proper) 135% LP headsail must intersect the spreader. That's also just simple geometry.

I suppose a number of characteristics of your setup could  make the difference. Maybe (1) it is not really a 135% LP for that rig's true hoist, or (2) the leech hollow is huge, or (3) the raised tack and possibly less than full hoist are enough to allow what we see, or (4) the spreader is exceptionally high, or (5) a little bit of all of these things. Whatever it is you have a significantly de-powered 135 under typical sail measuring practice. Which is fine if you like it.

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This boat has quite a lot of spreader rake, so that's why it fits a larger headsail

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20 hours ago, European Bloke said:

So as soon as you crack off a bit, unless you rerun the sheet, then the sail is chafing on the shroud?

I re-run the sheet once cracked off, normal cruising I don't sheet between stays. Worth it for pointing if racing.

The carabiner on the lifeline is for outboard sheeting, makes huge difference, opens slot and keeps leech trimmed when further off the wind.

I spent a lot of time as headsail trimmer on quite a few different boats, you learn its worth experimenting with all those different tracks and sheets tweekers etc. some boats have.

8 hours ago, El Boracho said:

So a typical (proper) 135% LP headsail

It measures as 135.24% what the fuck is a "proper" headsail? One that doesn't fit???

 

8 hours ago, El Boracho said:

Which is fine if you like it.

I like it, works bloody good too.

Maybe some of those old kiwi designers new what they were doing. Maybe my sailmaker is pretty on to it too.

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7 hours ago, BOI Guy said:

It measures as 135.24% what the fuck is a "proper" headsail? One that doesn't fit???

When the luff begins at the deck and ends very close to full-hoist. "LP" means "luff perpendicular", which doesn't say anything about the actual size of the sail. No need to get all bothered. I was only questioning that a 135% LP genoa would clear the spreader. As @longy helpfully pointed out you have swept spreaders. That along with some of the other things can get you there. All my full size 135's have extended well past the spreaders; with the wear patches to prove it. If you are really interested in going fast and pointing then tack that sail to the stem. And use a #1 when it is light. Did we learn if this was a race program? Because re-leading sheets while cracking off for a short reach to an over stood mark doesn't sound like a racing plan, however leading between the shrouds for one degree of lead angle does?

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On 10/12/2020 at 7:24 PM, See Level said:

Stretch's to conform, stays stuck good, easy to remove and comes off clean.

And is slippery so the sail doesn't chafe thru it so it's good for spreader tips as well.

3m-electrical-tapes-10828-dl-2w-64_1000.jpg

Make sure it's Vinyl as above and not PVC.  Most no brand electrical marking tape is PVC and doesn't hold up nearly as well as vinyl.

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11 minutes ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Make sure it's Vinyl as above and not PVC.  Most no brand electrical marking tape is PVC and doesn't hold up nearly as well as vinyl.

Interesting. That is what I use. But 35 is PVC (polyvinyl chloride). The difference in rig taping between that and the no-name discount stuff is astonishing.

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I think the rigging stuff is a different blend. Otherwise it probably would cost more than .50 cents a roll.  Unless I "borrow" from work most big places only have the good scotch in black so I have used many rolls of the cheap white stuff from random hardware stores.  It just gets brittle and ends up cracking apart, but still is good chaffe protection. Just have to redo it more.

The good vinly is meant to take a bit of heat so does well outside

 

If you want to get super fancy the scotch self vulcanizing tape as a first layer than cover with marking tape that lasts forever but is a mess to remove.  I like leather but it's only about 1-2 seasons in the tropics with saltwater, good job security though.

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