hobot

Vintage Sailing Gizmos

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What old school gizmo do you have sitting around?

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8 minutes ago, hobot said:

What old school gizmo do you have sitting around?

IMG_20200822_155548097.jpg

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Very important in the DR days ~~~

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Henri Lloyd spray top with the gore-tex peeled off the inside.  Was kind of like putting on a snowstorm when I found out.  

And a 1977 Laser.

And some other broken stuff.  The hockey puck lives on although I'm not sure where. 

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23 minutes ago, hobot said:

What old school gizmo do you have sitting around?

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I have one very similar to that, maybe even the same, box opens through the top though.

I have a pair of hand held CB radios! don't know if they still work though.

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4 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Davis Mark 15 Plastic Sextant - Davis

Duh !

 The USNA started teaching celestial again recently 

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34 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

Duh !

 The USNA started teaching celestial again recently 

Bout time, eh?

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36 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

Duh !

 The USNA started teaching celestial again recently 

What about Rules of Road Colregs 

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16 hours ago, floating dutchman said:

I have one very similar to that, maybe even the same, box opens through the top though.

I have a pair of hand held CB radios! don't know if they still work though.

Mine

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16 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Bout time, eh?

That...and position...

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Not a gizmo but I still have a Chapman's Piloting and Seamanship from the late 1970s. That and a few old Hal Roths make the guest bedroom bookshelf look very nautical.

 

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My entire boat is a vintage sailing gizmo, if a 40 year old boat counts as vintage.

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Yes Herbie, that looks more like my one, won't be home for just over a week but I'll have a look then.

An maybe post a photo of the CB's

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On 8/22/2020 at 7:19 PM, Ned said:

Henri Lloyd spray top with the gore-tex peeled off the inside.  Was kind of like putting on a snowstorm when I found out.  

And a 1977 Laser.

And some other broken stuff.  The hockey puck lives on although I'm not sure where. 

my spray top was red, until the blizzard

 

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my boat has a wooden tiller, does that count?

 

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9 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

my boat has a wooden tiller, does that count?

Do you qualify as Vintage?

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I'm vintage.. not sure about the boat

 

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Do you know what this is? Of course you do.

In French, "loch à hélice"; or "loch à poisson". I do not know the name in English...

Sorry for the poor quality pictures; taken with my phone...

 

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1 hour ago, Laurent said:

Do you know what this is? Of course you do.

In French, "loch à hélice"; or "loch à poisson". I do not know the name in English...

Sorry for the poor quality pictures; taken with my phone...

 

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I know it as a taffrail log but there may be other names. A lot of cool stuff here.

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1 hour ago, Laurent said:

Do you know what this is? Of course you do.

In French, "loch à hélice"; or "loch à poisson". I do not know the name in English...

Sorry for the poor quality pictures; taken with my phone...

 

20200825_165248.thumb.jpg.4f6f3ab47d9871a0a08def1cfba49e09.jpg

20200825_165308.thumb.jpg.c0aa248ceec3be09fdf56ae020cbbb21.jpg

 

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I’ve sailed 15,000 NM + -  with one of those recording the reading religiously at the end of each watch or whenever a course change was made

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Cool item!

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I have a Ca. 1935 Navy Chronometer.....

 I used to have the sextant that went with it, but that seems to have grown legs and walked away.

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Once upon a time (circa 2000-2001ish) I worked on a high spec offshore drill ship.  It was fresh from the builders’ yard, and was the latest and greatest of its time.  Had 6 thrusters, three independent engine rooms with 55,000 total horsepower, 10,000’ water depth capable, and scads of prototype drilling, control, position keeping, and ROV equipment, some of which actually worked! (the ROV shack was the place to be, as it was staffed with all young guys from Aberdeen and had the best AC on the ship.  Much more fun to hang out with than the drilling crew).  In doing my rounds of checking fire extinguishers, of which there were dozens and dozens, I’d find myself in the forepeak, which was otherwise a rarely visited compartment (even though it was the size of an average American home).  In there was the stuff that the builders must have furnished with all their newbuilds, including a good old fashioned sounding lead, complete with cupped bottom, genuine natural manila line, and all the correct bits of colored rag and scraps of leather and so forth to mark the fathoms.  I just found it an amusing contrast to the millions of dollars worth of gear dedicated to knowing how deep the water was located a few decks up.

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3 minutes ago, NaClH20 said:

Once upon a time (circa 2000-2001ish) I worked on a high spec offshore drill ship.  It was fresh from the builders’ yard, and was the latest and greatest of its time.  Had 6 thrusters, three independent engine rooms with 55,000 total horsepower, 10,000’ water depth capable, and scads of prototype drilling, control, position keeping, and ROV equipment, some of which actually worked! (the ROV shack was the place to be, as it was staffed with all young guys from Aberdeen and had the best AC on the ship.  Much more fun to hang out with than the drilling crew).  In doing my rounds of checking fire extinguishers, of which there were dozens and dozens, I’d find myself in the forepeak, which was otherwise a rarely visited compartment (even though it was the size of an average American home).  In there was the stuff that the builders must have furnished with all their newbuilds, including a good old fashioned sounding lead, complete with cupped bottom, genuine natural manila line, and all the correct bits of colored rag and scraps of leather and so forth to mark the fathoms.  I just found it an amusing contrast to the millions of dollars worth of gear dedicated to knowing how deep the water was located a few decks up.

I’ve used that type of cup lead, filled with wax for bringing up of bottom bits, mud, sand, shell, coral etc..

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1 hour ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I know it as a taffrail log but there may be other names. A lot of cool stuff here.

Yep, Looks like a Walker taffrail or towing log. Built around 1940-1950

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I did the 75 Fastnet on a half-tonner.  (Yes, I was young and silly then...)  Only navaids were a windex on the masthead, a towed rotating log and a rather dodgy RDF.

The towed log was a lot of fun in the West Solent, as it's officially part of the boat, so when you're on starboard, you're 200 feet long!  Much consternation from port tackers.

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2 hours ago, Navig8tor said:

Yep, Looks like a Walker taffrail or towing log. Built around 1940-1950

I never noticed but I looked closer...

It is a "KNOTMASTER MK III A" and written in fine prints along the bottom of the dial:

"Made in England by Thos. Walker & Son Ltd Birmingham"

It has a T.W. with an anchor logo on the top of the dial case...

 

I used it on my first boat, a half share on a Muscadet, designed by Philippe Harlé. The only electronic we had on board was a batteries powered depth sonder; the one with the spinning dial, where you had to adjust the gain to get only one red flashing light showing...

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Nautical-Navigation: Chart Compass/Dividers, 9" Parallel Rulers,12 ...

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3 hours ago, NaClH20 said:

Once upon a time (circa 2000-2001ish) I worked on a high spec offshore drill ship.  It was fresh from the builders’ yard, and was the latest and greatest of its time.  Had 6 thrusters, three independent engine rooms with 55,000 total horsepower, 10,000’ water depth capable, and scads of prototype drilling, control, position keeping, and ROV equipment, some of which actually worked! (the ROV shack was the place to be, as it was staffed with all young guys from Aberdeen and had the best AC on the ship.  Much more fun to hang out with than the drilling crew).  In doing my rounds of checking fire extinguishers, of which there were dozens and dozens, I’d find myself in the forepeak, which was otherwise a rarely visited compartment (even though it was the size of an average American home).  In there was the stuff that the builders must have furnished with all their newbuilds, including a good old fashioned sounding lead, complete with cupped bottom, genuine natural manila line, and all the correct bits of colored rag and scraps of leather and so forth to mark the fathoms.  I just found it an amusing contrast to the millions of dollars worth of gear dedicated to knowing how deep the water was located a few decks up.

That 10,000' leadline must have made a hell of a big coil. ;)

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11 hours ago, Laurent said:

....

 

I used it on my first boat, a half share on a Muscadet, designed by Philippe Harlé. The only electronic we had on board was a batteries powered depth sonder; the one with the spinning dial, where you had to adjust the gain to get only one red flashing light showing...

I had a boat in the 1970s with one of those, I guessed it's origin at around 1960 or so.

Worked pretty well, actually. As you note, understanding how to adjust it (which to me did not seem difficult) was a big part of using it.

- DSK

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18 hours ago, BravoBravo said:

I’ve sailed 15,000 NM + -  with one of those recording the reading religiously at the end of each watch or whenever a course change was made

I would take a reading and enter it in the log book every hour. 

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I built a Heath kit version of one of those depth gauges in the early 70's. it worked!

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Always wanted to build a HeathKit TV. Built a few heath radios, etc.. before I got experienced enough to design my own circuits. 

Just mentioning Heath makes it vintage.

 

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How about an RDF? I mean, it was 1970 and I was amazed that you could find where you were. Sort of. 

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9 minutes ago, dyslexic dog said:

How about an RDF? I mean, it was 1970 and I was amazed that you could find where you were. Sort of. 

Educatted gesse.................                 :)

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52 minutes ago, dyslexic dog said:

How about an RDF? I mean, it was 1970 and I was amazed that you could find where you were. Sort of. 

Voodoo navigation 

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6 hours ago, gptyk said:

Always wanted to build a HeathKit TV. Built a few heath radios, etc.. before I got experienced enough to design my own circuits. 

Just mentioning Heath makes it you vintage.

 

FIFY. Great stuff.

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Walkers log, used on my first long distance cruising. High arctic flying with a Chronometer and a sun compass for true bearings. Radio direction finders, more accurate than you would imagine.

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Clearing out the storage locker...

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12 minutes ago, hobot said:

Clearing out the storage locker...

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Watts, and Hood made their own cloth which was HUGE in the Dacron sail making days ... not all Dacron was anywhere near the same and most lofts got what was sent. The weave and resin specs were constantly evolving   Ted Hood and Lowell North were excellent sailors but it damn sure was sweet to have fast sails! North ordered from Bainbridge by specs and tested each roll with a pulling machine recording the numbers of the warp and weft along with a bias pull, rejecting if it was not up to specs

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On 8/26/2020 at 6:19 PM, dyslexic dog said:

How about an RDF? I mean, it was 1970 and I was amazed that you could find where you were. Sort of. 

You didn't need an RDF, you just needed one of these:  

Bar antenna inside.  Find an AM rock and roll radio station broadcast antenna marked on the chart, dial up the station and turn the radio until it nulled out.  Draw a line on the chart.  Find another AM station, repeat.  Find a third to triangulate.  

Found Diamond Head that way in '73 after some cloudy days blocked the stars.  Easy peasy.  

th.jpeg

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