stayoutofthemiddle

SORC - The Glory Years?

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When I was in a sophomore in college I raced my first and the very last SORC on a Mumm 36, and have the t-shirt to prove it! It was a buoy race format in Miami and if I recall it was a 4 day event in March after KWRW. The following year I believe it was renamed Miami Race Week.

From the old timers, I heard the original SORC was true to to it's acronym, Southern Ocean Racing Conference, a collection of distance races around the Caribbean.  

Curious if anyone has any history to share on the original format and the years it ran that way before it was dissolved into a buoy race then killed off?

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Back with spinnakers look fucking cool

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It was cool, I 'm in the last pic. 1983. Multi race, traveling series. 

race 1) start in St Pete, down to Boca Grande, return

2) St Pete to Fort Lauderdale

one week break

3) triangle race off Miami

4)Miami to Nassau

5) triangle race off Nassau

Racing fleet was mostly new boats, custom designs, with pro level crews. If you won SORC you could claim to be the best in the USA. Most of the east coast boats came down, as it was warm, the top west coast boats would truck in, a few euro boats would show up. The ocean racing was usually a driving fetch trying to get into the stream (or out of it) so reaching performance was important

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Some background reading...

 

http://www.premiere-racing.com/miami/2005_miami/miami_2005_SORC_history.htm

https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fl-xpm-1985-01-31-8501040176-story.html

https://www.nytimes.com/1976/02/01/archives/sorc-changes-to-trim-sails.html

https://vault.si.com/vault/1981/03/09/animal-house-goes-to-sea-this-years-sorc-winners-are-the-guys-from-the-crude-whose-antics-are-rude

(SI used to carry lots of stories about the SORC, surprisingly.)

For my money, the glory years were ~1972-1987 or so. Tons of new boats, materials, sails, techniques, hardware... coincident with the glory years of IOR, I feel.

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1969 can be considered the watershed year. New boat builds and outstanding crews that competed changed much of yacht design and racing. Fresh ideas, great sailors and fast new boats. West coast boats came east. Windward Passage and Lively Lady are notable as they dealt blows to the older CCA fleet.

 

 

0_0_4816_6879.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Black Jack said:

1969 can be considered the watershed year. New boat builds and outstanding crews that competed changed much of yacht design and racing. Fresh ideas, great sailors and fast new boats. West coast boats came east. Windward Passage and Lively Lady are notable as they dealt blows to the older CCA fleet.

Did the SC 70's participate? Sounds like there was weeks and weeks of sailing events! Who had that much time off work unless you were a rich owner or paid pro, or was that the only make up of the crews?!

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Conner's book "No Excuse to Loose" has a really good description of the series and the races.

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1 hour ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Did the SC 70's participate? Sounds like there was weeks and weeks of sailing events! Who had that much time off work unless you were a rich owner or paid pro, or was that the only make up of the crews?!

The SC 70's only came into existence around 1985.  SORC was pretty much all IOR, or at least all that really mattered.  SORC was on the wane by then and I don't even remember if any maxi's even competed in it by 1985. 

Clipper (Kenwood) Cup was probably a bigger event by then.  Kenwood Cup maxi divs were dominated by boats like Windward Passage, Kialoa IV, the Condors, and even Mistress Quickly was there in 1978.

IMO any decent IOR maxi would lay a beat down on a SC 70 in anything resembling typical SORC or Clipper Cup conditions.

As to time off, I'm not sure how that worked, but few if any paid pros on payroll that I was aware of.  Some industry pro's would would sail with you if you bought their companies product, but that was about it as far as I know.

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Very few paid sailors - many industry reps would sail with a boat if they bought a lot of product. In '83 on Secret Love we had: North Sails & Lowell North, Sparcraft spars & Ron Love, Penguin Blocks & Buzz Boettcher,(sp?) on the crew list.. These luminaries allowed the owners to also enlist Greg Gillette & Louie Wake to the team. This was supposedly the reason for the one week break in the regatta, to allow exec's a chance to get back to work

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Fascinating the interest in this era, yachting really was peaking. It had a lot to do with economics, basically people coming out of the greatest period of jobs and wages plus the demographics.  All those young baby boomers in their prime, demographics and wages have likewise killed yachting today relatively...

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10 minutes ago, longy said:

Very few paid sailors - many industry reps would sail with a boat if they bought a lot of product. In '83 on Secret Love we had: North Sails & Lowell North, Sparcraft spars & Ron Love, Penguin Blocks & Buzz Boettcher,(sp?) on the crew list.. These luminaries allowed the owners to also enlist Greg Gillette & Louie Wake to the team. This was supposedly the reason for the one week break in the regatta, to allow exec's a chance to get back to work

Before the days of email and mobile devices so being gone from the office that long was probably very noticeable! 

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I think there are ton of great SORC photos in this thread -

 

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At its heyday, SORC was one of the events in a global circuit (often called WORC, World Ocean Racing Conference, but I don't remember if that was an official "thing" or it is just what the circuit was called).  Events include

Admirals Cup
Sardinia Cup
SORC
Southern Cross Cup
Clipper Cup (later Kenwood Cup)
….and probably a few I've forgotten. (Big Boat Series was often a stop on the west-coast swing every other year....)

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11 minutes ago, longy said:

Very few paid sailors - many industry reps would sail with a boat if they bought a lot of product. In '83 on Secret Love we had: North Sails & Lowell North, Sparcraft spars & Ron Love, Penguin Blocks & Buzz Boettcher,(sp?) on the crew list.. These luminaries allowed the owners to also enlist Greg Gillette & Louie Wake to the team. This was supposedly the reason for the one week break in the regatta, to allow exec's a chance to get back to work

Very few paid crew at Big Boat or Clipper/Kenwood either.  A driver like Connor or North would get a gig on a big boat, and everyone would talk about it, but paying trimmers and bow people was not at all common, let alone grinders. 

 

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1 hour ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Did the SC 70's participate? Sounds like there was weeks and weeks of sailing events! Who had that much time off work unless you were a rich owner or paid pro, or was that the only make up of the crews?!

I read a story about that in a sailing mag BITD that stuck with me because it illustrated what was really involved.

It was mid 70's and SORC was THE series in North America. A guy from the Great Lakes had a Tartan 41 - an obsolete but still pretty fast boat - and he decided to do a "family and friends" vacation sort of "program" for SORC.

Bought a couple of new sails and prepped the boat then trucked it down.

No hope of any sort of placing, just for fun and to participate at the very top.

The reason the story stuck with me is because he said it cost $50K to do it.

That was the price of a nice house in a good area here or a new Peterson One Tonner. For 3 weeks of playing in the sun in winter.

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49 minutes ago, longy said:

Very few paid sailors - many industry reps would sail with a boat if they bought a lot of product. In '83 on Secret Love we had: North Sails & Lowell North, Sparcraft spars & Ron Love, Penguin Blocks & Buzz Boettcher,(sp?) on the crew list.. These luminaries allowed the owners to also enlist Greg Gillette & Louie Wake to the team. This was supposedly the reason for the one week break in the regatta, to allow exec's a chance to get back to work

 

I think it would be appropriate to mention Brad.  Don't you?

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48 minutes ago, longy said:

 ...In '83 on Secret Love...

Ah yes...Secret Love.

Isn't that the boat that crossed an underway freighter by something like 18 ft in I think SF Bay? if so are you able to provide any more to the story.  A Coast Guard fine and/or other repercussions IIRC.  Certainly created an uproar in the sailing press at the time - but that was a long time ago and I'm not sure if I have the story right.

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8 minutes ago, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

 

I think it would be appropriate to mention Brad.  Don't you?

Can't mention the owners without high praise for Barbara also.

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16 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

Ah yes...Secret Love.

Isn't that the boat that crossed an underway freighter by something like 18 ft in I think SF Bay?

Funny how the number keeps getting smaller through the years.

1983, IIRC, and from my perspective (on a boat in the next class back), Secret Love was nowhere close.  Aleta... could have gotten interesting.

Archived thread here:

 

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4 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

Ah yes...Secret Love.

Isn't that the boat that crossed an underway freighter by something like 18 ft in I think SF Bay? if so are you able to provide any more to the story.  A Coast Guard fine and/or other repercussions IIRC.  Certainly created an uproar in the sailing press at the time - but that was a long time ago and I'm not sure if I have the story right.

Yes, that wuz us. Latitude 38 whipped up quite a frenzy over that, for many months. Unknown to most is the actual circumstances. As we were crossing from Yellow Bluff to StFYC the car carrier was making her entrance under the bridge. We were taking constant bearings on her, and they were always indicating we would cross ahead. However, the ship was simultaneously turning right, to transit down the city front instead of the much more common route N of Alcatraz IS.. She did not ever signal this, only the 5 horn danger signal. As we were leading our class, and all indicators had us crossing in front, we held on. We were two sail reaching & ready to jibe away at all times. We crossed her bow about 150 yds ahead, but CPA was when she was directly behind us, 50 yds (? it's a long time ago). Lat 38 persisted for many years to print a foto of a boat appearing to be right under the bow of the car carrier, but that sailboat was actually 'Annabelle Lee' a Pet 48 well behind us, except for the magic of a big telefoto lens. The USCG had been looking for a test case on sailboat/ship interactions on the bay for quite a while, and the pilot obliged by filing a formal complaint, so off to court it went. 

Classic quote from Lowell North at the inquiry: "we could not have impeded the progress of the ship even if it had hit us". Also some interesting results of the decision, but privy to the owner's.

 

I just re-read the clip Sledrcr quoted above, glad to see my memories are still consistent.

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6 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Funny how the number keeps getting smaller through the years.

1983, IIRC, and from my perspective (on a boat in the next class back), Secret Love was nowhere close.  Aleta... could have gotten interesting.

Archived thread here:

 

Okay, thanks.

Kind of thought at the time it seemed like maybe this incident was more of a Coast Guard driven witch hunt.  And they knew it would be a much bigger story (which it was) than if it were some schlep in his Catalina 27

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Arguably, Ted Turner is the best example of the millionaire sailor with friends and crew doing the circuit with special note of entering the SORC starting the mid 1960s  into the following decades. Being shot and doing voice over work often for the wide world of sports sailing coverage, the coverboy of many of the rags  and his cross over to Americas Cup - he was the real deal of who these guys were. Now if Turner told the narrative - we would have an epic read of the life and times of sailing during America's golden age.

"Turner moved into big boats with charters for the Southern Ocean Racing Circuit, literally learning the ropes as he went along. He learned fast, winning the SORC overall in 1966, and leading a timber-rattling après sail crew celebration that was considered “outrageous.”

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2 hours ago, 12 metre said:

Okay, thanks.

Kind of thought at the time it seemed like maybe this incident was more of a Coast Guard driven witch hunt.  And they knew it would be a much bigger story (which it was) than if it were some schlep in his Catalina 27

Still close enough to disappear out of sight from the ships bridge.

Screenshot_20200825-154638.png

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A great foto, NOT the one L 38 kept posting. I don't know the extent of visibility from the ship's bridge, but I find it hard to beleive our masthead disappeared.

Ancient history now, tho.

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2 hours ago, Black Jack said:

Arguably, Ted Turner is the best example of the millionaire sailor with friends and crew doing the circuit with special note of entering the SORC starting the mid 1960s  into the following decades. Being shot and doing voice over work often for the wide world of sports sailing coverage, the coverboy of many of the rags  and his cross over to Americas Cup - he was the real deal of who these guys were. Now if Turner told the narrative - we would have an epic read of the life and times of sailing during America's golden age.

"Turner moved into big boats with charters for the Southern Ocean Racing Circuit, literally learning the ropes as he went along. He learned fast, winning the SORC overall in 1966, and leading a timber-rattling après sail crew celebration that was considered “outrageous.”

a buddy got on one year with ted to do SORC AS A DECK APE

 mid 70's no pay

he had a bit of  bay racing but not a lot prior off shore time maybe one SORC or part of one

HE SAID TED YELLED SO MUCH IT WAS NOT MUCH FUN

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You pussies today couldn't take the rigor of the schedule back in the day...or so I'm told.  Never sailed it personally.

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Did the bow on my first of many SORC’s in 1968... LORAN was not allowed , hanked headsail changes and roller reefing mainsails, before slab reefing appeared 

Captain of larger boats were paid , a few got plane tickets in my early days 

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6 hours ago, longy said:

It was cool, I 'm in the last pic. 1983. Multi race, traveling series. 

race 1) start in St Pete, down to Boca Grande, return

2) St Pete to Fort Lauderdale

one week break

3) triangle race off Miami

4)Miami to Nassau

5) triangle race off Nassau

Racing fleet was mostly new boats, custom designs, with pro level crews. If you won SORC you could claim to be the best in the USA. Most of the east coast boats came down, as it was warm, the top west coast boats would truck in, a few euro boats would show up. The ocean racing was usually a driving fetch trying to get into the stream (or out of it) so reaching performance was important

One of my friends raced on Tweety 

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1 hour ago, See Level said:

Still close enough to disappear out of sight from the ships bridge.

 

That doesn't mean much. Based on the height of the bridge and the length of the ship that blind spot can extend for hundreds of yards which is why ships have lookouts on the bow.

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6 hours ago, Expat Canuck said:

Conner's book "No Excuse to Loose" has a really good description of the series and the races.

Did he cover tossing the ballast ? 
 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/sports/1981/04/04/scandal-strikes-yachting-world/91f84403-8c7d-4f30-8f98-8dda6511a38d/

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33 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

That doesn't mean much. Based on the height of the bridge and the length of the ship that blind spot can extend for hundreds of yards which is why ships have lookouts on the bow.

And didn't the bow lookout testify he was looking straight down at the boat?  

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And per Yachting mag article at the time, Lowell North's statement  to the coast guard was that the closest the ship came was 75' after they crossed

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52 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

And didn't the bow lookout testify he was looking straight down at the boat?  

No idea. I was just saying that there are very many things you cannot see from the bridge of a ship, and the fact that the bridge could not see a sailboat doesn't mean anything. On a tanker that blind spot extends miles because the bridge is so low as a percentage of distance to the bow.

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8 hours ago, longy said:

Very few paid sailors

Yup.  If you were lucky enough to be in an "open checkbook" program, the owner might pay airfare and hotel.  But even that was relatively rare.  I always thought it was cool that the Kialoa crew - cream of the crop - paid their own way to regattas.  Kinda underscored that they were part of the team, not "employees of the program".

Most of us made our living somewhere on the edges of the sport... I did rigging and deliveries, others did boat maintenance,  or similar.

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10 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Did the SC 70's participate? Sounds like there was weeks and weeks of sailing events! Who had that much time off work unless you were a rich owner or paid pro, or was that the only make up of the crews?!

Crew earned money the old fashion way, delivering boats to the next regatta.

- Stumbling

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2 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

No idea. I was just saying that there are very many things you cannot see from the bridge of a ship, and the fact that the bridge could not see a sailboat doesn't mean anything. On a tanker that blind spot extends miles because the bridge is so low as a percentage of distance to the bow.

 

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5 hours ago, nota said:

a buddy got on one year with ted to do SORC AS A DECK APE

 mid 70's no pay

he had a bit of  bay racing but not a lot prior off shore time maybe one SORC or part of one

HE SAID TED YELLED SO MUCH IT WAS NOT MUCH FUN

That could be said for most of the top rockstars who entered boats and sailed the SORC. Ted Turner - we knew that simply from the docks or when he got a heat on afterward/ Dennis Conner, Tom Blackaller, Buddy Melges, and John Kolius were to have been said to have been more vocal than most.  Blackaller would tune up his crew good and for his competition...  well that is legendary.

 

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Blackaller yelled all right.  He got away with it because he really was that good.  On the other hand Lowell North rarely said a word and neither did Ted Hood.  

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23 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

When I was in a sophomore in college I raced my first and the very last SORC on a Mumm 36, and have the t-shirt to prove it! It was a buoy race format in Miami and if I recall it was a 4 day event in March after KWRW. The following year I believe it was renamed Miami Race Week.

From the old timers, I heard the original SORC was true to to it's acronym, Southern Ocean Racing Conference, a collection of distance races around the Caribbean.  

Curious if anyone has any history to share on the original format and the years it ran that way before it was dissolved into a buoy race then killed off?

FWIW - here is the overall keeper trophy from the year you described for the IMS fleet.

19ECED1F-121B-4E4E-BAAE-A252A930481C.jpeg

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20 hours ago, sledracr said:

At its heyday, SORC was one of the events in a global circuit (often called WORC, World Ocean Racing Conference, but I don't remember if that was an official "thing" or it is just what the circuit was called).  Events include

Admirals Cup
Sardinia Cup
SORC
Southern Cross Cup
Clipper Cup (later Kenwood Cup)
….and probably a few I've forgotten. (Big Boat Series was often a stop on the west-coast swing every other year....)

Pretty sure Transpac was part of this every odd numbered summer and I think Cape Town to Rio was on the list too. Got an invite to do Cape Town to Rio on Stormvogel after Transpac but Uncle Sam said he needed me to put on a green uniform instead.

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SORC was lots of fun, for the five weeks it lasted in the 70s to mid 80s.  It really was the first "presentation" of the season's new boats, and as such was covered in all the world's racing yacht mags, especially Seahorse that used to do a pretty good analysis of each new boat.

As above, there weren't any pro teams.  The only people who got paid were BNs like me who did all the prep and maintenance for the owner's boat, and occasionally some "day workers" in the yard on the bigger boats who helped the tiny full-time paid crew.  Also at the end of the series in Nassau, there were some occasional paid delivery gigs to get the boat back to LIS or Miami or wherever.  Sailing a 43 back across the Bahama Bank to the Gun Cay/Cat Cay exit was always fun.  Water depth 9 feet, and you draw 8.

Otherwise sharing a hotel room with 5 other guys was normal, as was the "all you can eat" Howard Johnson breakfast in St Pete, and the similar brunch at Pier 66 in Lauderdale.  I remember the manager curtailing this after I took a dozen big lads from Condor and another maxi in there and pretty nearly cleaned the place out.

The racing was good too.  Always very tight class starts, and apart from the short race (Governor's Cup, I think) in Nassau, all races a hundred miles or more.

I made friends for a lifetime in the SORC.  I miss it.

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12 hours ago, savoir said:

Blackaller yelled all right.  He got away with it because he really was that good.  On the other hand Lowell North rarely said a word and neither did Ted Hood.  

Bus Mosbacher - of AC fame - was famous for almost never saying a word.  He used hand signals to indicate trim (a spinning finger), stop (fist), ease (waving finger), etc.   A waving hand meant tack.  Now. 

A new crew missed a "trim" spinning finger gesture until another crew tapped his shoulder and pointed.  That earned the new guy a "We won't be needing you tomorrow"  comment on the dock.

It was a nearly dead silent, and very boring boat to sail on, unless you really liked award's ceremonies. 

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Anyone remember the yacht Glory?  From the Midwest I believe. 

She turned up in some style in St Pete a week or so before the start of the 83 series in a beautiful paint job, on the back of a matching Peterbilt tractor-trailer rig, all painted in the same boat graphics.  Two similarly painted boat vans followed.  I think the owner had a trucking company.

I remember one wag, probably Don Krippendorf, drinking beers on the St Pete YC deck and watching this convoy as it trundled past. "I wonder if it sails as fast as it looks?"

It didn't.

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29 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Anyone remember the yacht Glory? 

Peterson-42 out of the Seattle area (John Buchan), IIRC

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53 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

It was a nearly dead silent, and very boring boat to sail on, unless you really liked award's ceremonies. 

I get that.

Early 90s I raced on two different sleds.  One, with a very-well-known Kiwi driver, was a loud boat.  Him yelling, people yelling back, not boring.... and not efficient.

The other one had Dave Ullman as the driver, super-calm, never raised his voice, for the most part the boat was chill even in the heat of battle.  Crew was "switched on" and knew when the boat was gibing, or whatever, so nobody had to call for a gibe, he just started turning the boat and we did our jobs.

Nearly dead silent… but also very cool to be a part of.

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48 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Anyone remember the yacht Glory?  From the Midwest I believe. 

She turned up in some style in St Pete a week or so before the start of the 83 series in a beautiful paint job, on the back of a matching Peterbilt tractor-trailer rig, all painted in the same boat graphics.  Two similarly painted boat vans followed.  I think the owner had a trucking company.

I remember one wag, probably Don Krippendorf, drinking beers on the St Pete YC deck and watching this convoy as it trundled past. "I wonder if it sails as fast as it looks?"

It didn't.

Definitely John Buchan from Seattle.  Very successful house-builder,  One of many "Glory"s that he has owned.  Named after his wife Gloria.  Brother of Bill Buchan and uncle of Carl.  Who have wracked up a few trophies here and there. 

IIRC, he bought the truck to do the delivery and sold it afterwards.  Cheaper that way.   

I thought that was his Soverel 39, but it's a long time ago.  The boat ended up mid-fleet, in any case..  Not the right boat for the event.

 

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58 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Definitely John Buchan from Seattle.  Very successful house-builder,  One of many "Glory"s that he has owned.  Named after his wife Gloria.  Brother of Bill Buchan and uncle of Carl.  Who have wracked up a few trophies here and there. 

IIRC, he bought the truck to do the delivery and sold it afterwards.  Cheaper that way.   

I thought that was his Soverel 39, but it's a long time ago.  The boat ended up mid-fleet, in any case..  Not the right boat for the event.

 

2nd of 18 in the one ton fleet in 1985 with the French 1 ton (Finot)...

Mid fleet with the matching  Peterson 43 and Tractor in 1983...

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1985/01/27/sports/70-boats-enter-sorc-race.html

 

 

A9E26049-3376-43AE-A94B-5432DA2E5F05.jpeg

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My recollection could have been 81 not 83.  In which case it was the Peterson 42.  There were a bunch of them that year.  I was on Impasse.

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1983 was for-sure the Peterson (sail number 59950)

1985 was for-sure the Beneteau/Finot (sail number 69250)

 

I don't think the Chance ever made the trip to SORC, 

In fact I don't think the Buchans had a presence at SORC in 1981 or 82.... but that's a lot of braincells under the bridge

 

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1 minute ago, sledracr said:

1983 was for-sure the Peterson (sail number 59950)

Yes, 83.  Racing with Krippendorf on Jack Frassanito's great 41 Chloe, which was either Bruce Kelley or Bernard Nivelt design, can't recall. 

That's why I remember Don's comment from the SPYC deck.

Don was later famous for driving Razzle Dazzle into a channel marker while he was groping in the wheel well for his shades that had fallen off.  Another story.  Like the famous lunchtime visit in his Rolls Royce to the Bell Bar - an infamous biker hangout.

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3 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Yes, 83.  Racing with Krippendorf on Jack Frassanito's great 41 Chloe, which was either Bruce Kelley or Bernard Nivelt design, can't

Kelley, IIRC

1983 was also the year the Wicked Witch of the Northwest <shudder> made her SORC debut with Oz, a slight update of Razzle Dazzle

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37 minutes ago, sledracr said:

^^^that's the 1985 Glory, not the 1983 Glory

I know which it is , someone mentioned a Soveral 39 vs the Finot ,  John did not have a Soveral  until the 50 in 1990s... FWIW here is a fun pic of the Finot...  I have a similar pic like this of the Chance 54 at the 82 Kenwood Cup...

D1C1D28D-D1D0-427D-9183-40707E6B8958.jpeg

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There was a Chance-designed Glory at the 1982 Clipper Cup - she had an interesting/weird extension of the skeg to the transom. 

The Peterson 42 Glory was in Class D at the 1983 SORC, finished 8th, 17th overall.

Glory.jpg

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38 minutes ago, sledracr said:

1983 was for-sure the Peterson (sail number 59950)

1985 was for-sure the Beneteau/Finot (sail number 69250)

 

I don't think the Chance ever made the trip to SORC, 

In fact I don't think the Buchans had a presence at SORC in 1981 or 82.... but that's a lot of braincells under the bridge

 

What's a bunch of brain cells when it comes to sailing in the SORC? It's all about priorities. 

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Grown in Chicago, my first taste of saltwater at the age of 17 was the 1971 Miami to Lucaya race. I did the St. Pete to Lauderdale race the following year, and in '73 I did all the East Coast races and Nassau. I'm proud to be a founding member of IBNA,  born out of fun during prep for the 1974 SORC at the Courtney Ross yard in Clearwater.  I had great teachers in boat prep and learned from the best of the early pros. That pretty much set my course to play with sailboats the rest of my life instead of make money. Somewhere I have a photo I shot of Commodore Tompkins at the top of the rig on La Forza Del Destino going to Nassau in '74. They'd lost both sheets and guys in a massive wipeout and the kite streamed from the masthead until he got up there and literally lasso'd the sucker. Ballsiest thing I've ever seen.  

The SORC was about racing offshore with all of it's vagaries. Boats were still comfortable then and we mostly kept real watches and slept in real bunks with real food. By '81, the pros had too much influence on owners and started the long decay, replacing fun with performance. I was back in 1981 as sailmaker with a French Whitbread team there for shakedown and I had a berth for the 81/82 Whitbread on another boat. But the '81 Lauderdale race was upwind in 30k from Largo to the finish. Condo jumping in the Stream with 50 degree air and 80 degree water, lashed to the weather rail. Somewhere along the line, I figured out I didn't enjoy it all that much, even with the knowledge we'd be finished and having a steak at Chuck's within hours. I just couldn't imagine the prospect of weeks in even worse conditions, so I bailed and missed what turned out to be a less than happy race around the world.

Through the 1970's, the SORC was the place to be in February. Then I learned about SoCal races to Mexico and Hawaii. It makes so much more sense to surf downwind in warm breeze than bash around in the cold.

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2 hours ago, XPRO said:

I think this is John’s Perry designed boat just before the 1980s campaigns.

Heather, in Port Ludlow for the Perry Rendezvous this past weekend

117951486_2731332440479466_2991416496470071452_o.thumb.jpg.b1a2335fedb84b7b072fd3a5b3c40262.jpg

 

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52 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Heather, in Port Ludlow for the Perry Rendezvous this past weekend

117951486_2731332440479466_2991416496470071452_o.thumb.jpg.b1a2335fedb84b7b072fd3a5b3c40262.jpg

 

Good to see it's had some love - it was looking very sad when it was up for sale a few years ago.

That boat was so dominant around here that it was said to have killed class A racing in the Salish Sea.

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17 hours ago, Richard2249 said:

There was a Chance-designed Glory at the 1982 Clipper Cup - she had an interesting/weird extension of the skeg to the transom. 

The Peterson 42 Glory was in Class D at the 1983 SORC, finished 8th, 17th overall.

Glory.jpg

Looks like breeze on here uphill! Where is this photo taken? Which SORC course? Is this why someone mentioned above the SC70's would never have done well if they had showed up??!!!

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17 hours ago, XPRO said:

I think this is John’s Perry designed boat just before the 1980s campaigns.

3AB327B4-0A48-4044-9972-812C6A339125.jpeg

....more questions from the yuts! Can someone remind me what the "double" spinnakers are called? Why was this design killed off? I seems you'd have more sail area thus faster downhill....

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7 minutes ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

....more questions from the yuts! Can someone remind me what the "double" spinnakers are called? Why was this design killed off? I seems you'd have more sail area thus faster downhill....

Bloopers.

They were to dampen rolling when the displacement hulls were already trying to go faster than hull speed so they couldn't add the speed they look like they would.

Standard comment at the time was they added 1/2 knot when they went up and they added 1/2 knot when they came down.

Made the best sailing photos ever though.

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13 minutes ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Looks like breeze on here uphill! Where is this photo taken? Which SORC course? Is this why someone mentioned above the SC70's would never have done well if they had showed up??!!!

Ummmm... those hills in the background are about 3 or 4 times the highest point of land in Floriduh.

I suspect that was taken in the Salish Sea - the boats home.

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27 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Ummmm... those hills in the background are about 3 or 4 times the highest point of land in Floriduh.

I suspect that was taken in the Salish Sea - the boats home.

Post above says Clipper Cup (Hawaii).

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Talking about Howard Johnson's in St. Petersberg. As a kid looking for ride I helped wash our sails in the pool there. Never got a ride (although I was promised next year), I did eat breakfast with the crew who were already suffering hangovers.

card00875_fr.jpg

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Looks like breeze on here uphill! Where is this photo taken? Which SORC course? Is this why someone mentioned above the SC70's would never have done well if they had showed up??!!!

As JoeO said - Clipper Cup

But here is a famous SORC photo of Love Machine 2 - a Y.M Tanton design.  He is a fairly regular poster here and worked alongside Bob Perry at Dick Carters design office in the early 70's

I've included a second photo as it was a kind of now your seem him now you don't. Apparently that is Yves Marie in  the blue foulies taken just before the photo above.

Love Machine - Tom Leutwiler.jpg

Love Machine prior.jpg

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8 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

As JoeO said - Clipper Cup

But here is a famous SORC photo of Love Machine 2 - a Y.M Tanton design.  He is a fairly regular poster here and worked alongside Bob Perry at Dick Carters design office in the early 70's

Love Machine - Tom Leutwiler.jpg

1976 Miami ~Nassau Race..I skippered a Class win and high fleet finish “Blind Melon”... nasty crossing of the GS ... built the boat too

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10 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

1976 Miami ~Nassau Race..I skippered a Class win and high fleet finish “Blind Melon”... nasty crossing of the GS 

I seem to recall Blind Melon was a Heritage One Ton - or was it a Holland?  Long time ago.

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6 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

I seem to recall Blind Melon was a Heritage One Ton - or was it a Holland?  Long time ago.

Kiwi One Ton/Ron Holland

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1 hour ago, BravoBravo said:

1976 Miami ~Nassau Race..I skippered a Class win and high fleet finish “Blind Melon”... nasty crossing of the GS ... built the boat too

 

1 hour ago, 12 metre said:

As JoeO said - Clipper Cup

But here is a famous SORC photo of Love Machine 2 - a Y.M Tanton design.  He is a fairly regular poster here and worked alongside Bob Perry at Dick Carters design office in the early 70's

I've included a second photo as it was a kind of now your seem him now you don't. Apparently that is Yves Marie in  the blue foulies taken just before the photo above.

Love Machine - Tom Leutwiler.jpg

 

Pretty epic photo! I hope the crew has this one framed on the wall. Looks like they are beating perpendicular to the wave action. Brutal day on the rail.

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21 hours ago, sledracr said:

I get that.

Early 90s I raced on two different sleds.  One, with a very-well-known Kiwi driver, was a loud boat.  Him yelling, people yelling back, not boring.... and not efficient.

The other one had Dave Ullman as the driver, super-calm, never raised his voice, for the most part the boat was chill even in the heat of battle.  Crew was "switched on" and knew when the boat was gibing, or whatever, so nobody had to call for a gibe, he just started turning the boat and we did our jobs.

Nearly dead silent… but also very cool to be a part of.

Sailed with Dave quite a bit on Taxi - loved sailing with him. Very quiet and very efficient. We all quickly dialed into his style and I think it made for a strong feeling of team connectedness. We watched everything and never spoke above a whisper (and only then for a brief sentence or question) unless Dave asked us to. Can only remember him yelling once - at the owner (no names here) during Big Boat. The statement was something like "If you're not going to listen to me then we're going in, I've got better things to do." The owner explained that he'd misunderstood what Dave was trying to get him to do and after that all was smooth and efficient. Think we won three or four Big Boats with that team - great experiences.

He trained us on a J-105 for the S.F. North Americans. Worked us hard on a lot of very complex maneuvers all aimed at typical Bay winds, tides and a 40 boat fleet. The crew work gelled quickly and, again, made for a strong team.

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12 minutes ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

 

Pretty epic photo! I hope the crew has this one framed on the wall. Looks like they are beating perpendicular to the wave action. Brutal day on the rail.

Close reach... I held high of the fleet on the way to Great Isaac  thinking the wind was going easterly , it did and we made  it, while most of the fleet had to tack to round Issac

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4 minutes ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Sure? The genoa looked nailed in. 

See my edit 

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Bloopers.

They were to dampen rolling when the displacement hulls were already trying to go faster than hull speed

Also, made it (in theory) faster when going dead-downwind.... although we already knew that playing slightly angles for boatspeed was actually faster.

DDW is slow.  Bloopers made it slightly less slow.

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I suspect that was taken in the Salish Sea - the boats home.

Hawaii, Clipper Cup would be my guess.

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3 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Looks like breeze on here uphill! Where is this photo taken? Which SORC course? Is this why someone mentioned above the SC70's would never have done well if they had showed up??!!!

Glory is short tacking up the West tip of Oahu here. That rounded peak directly behind her is KOKO HEAD. So this is '82 (?) Clipper Cup. Local knowledge would say she is way too offshore for this section of the course. It's either the 'Round the State' race or the middle distance race, which went up the N side of Molokai, across to Maui, & returned the same way

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Not an SORC story but a good one from the Glory Years before we had "paid" pro's.  It's the early 80's and my "skipper", (mentor who brought me into the competitive side of the sport) has a new J24 on order with a full set of Horizons, (I think).  We're sailing a loaner 24 in some annual local lake PHRF regatta.  David Flynn, (pretty sure straight out of college and his fist loft gig) is sailing with us as the Horizon rep.  We're 3 up on a 24.  Super light air.  Just before the start, (we're in sequence) a cop boat comes up with lights flashing to get our skipper off the boat due to a family emergency.   Skipper is freaked out and gets on the cop boat.  "I'm like ok let's go in."  Not Flynn- he grabs the help and says "Hey man- grab the jib we're racin.!"  So we 2 handed around the course and just about beat everyone boat for boat.  Fortunately the story ended up with a good ending.  Family member had a significant mental breakdown, but was physically fine and later in life ended up very successful. 

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22 hours ago, Richard2249 said:

There was a Chance-designed Glory at the 1982 Clipper Cup - she had an interesting/weird extension of the skeg to the transom. 

The Peterson 42 Glory was in Class D at the 1983 SORC, finished 8th, 17th overall.

Glory.jpg

The sterns on Chance IOR boats appeared to have gone through several evolutions.

First was the narrow pintail of the early 70's

Followed by a fuller roundish section in his mid 70's daggerboarders I.e. Resolute Salmon and Bay Bea).  Below are a couple of his 3/4T board designs of that era, North Star and Sachem.  In North Star you can see a similar skeg extension as in Glory, even though Sachem did not - possibly due to the cold molded construction.  IDK.

After board boats were effectively banned, it seems he turned to a quadrilateral (for lack of a better term) stern with skeg extension as in Glory and another 37 footer that was for sale a few years ago which was advertised as a One Ton (so pre-1983 given the LOA). Not sure if the ad had the name, but I can't recall it anyway.

Would be interesting to see the type of stern his 3/4T Eclipse had and what era it was.  It apparently was a very successful boat in SoCal from what I've read on the web.

post-6361-052634900 1306939264.jpg

Sachem.jpg

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Why? Never really a stand out performer. Remembered more for roll over & crew antics?

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