JBOATTROUBLEMAKER

Should I Even Bother

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Trying to set up a deal to look at an allegedly good J24 with no listed model year and older hatch for $2700. Apparently only has a small soft patch in the " glass in-between the mast and bow". 

 

Should I even bother?

Lines and wood look decent.

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Sail number?

Verm status?

Condition of the mast, trailer, etc?

One benefit of the old hatches is that they’re a lot lighter, so your COG stays a little lower.

If the comment about the glass is intended to imply a soggy core, then yeah you could do better with another boat, unless it’s otherwise in outstanding shape and you like doing repairs.

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18 hours ago, Cashelmore said:

Sail number?

Verm status?

Condition of the mast, trailer, etc?

One benefit of the old hatches is that they’re a lot lighter, so your COG stays a little lower.

If the comment about the glass is intended to imply a soggy core, then yeah you could do better with another boat, unless it’s otherwise in outstanding shape and you like doing repairs.

All info I am inquiring about. Had the opportunity to buy a boat with 2 soft spots in the starboard lazzarette (where a bailing put was fitted) and one in the port stantion for $1500 (with a trailer). Had vermiculite in the keel and was an older 78 boat...could be a money pit.

 

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It's a gamble. Take a moisture meter if you can find one and scope out how bad the moisture is. Check everywhere, not just the bow. They're a little tricky to use (for me at least) but I'm sure there's a thread somewhere on this site on doing it properly. If it's just the foredeck and you have the time/money/patience to pour into it, why not.

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All J/24s will eventually need deck recoring to some degree or other, unless you go buy a factory 5000 series and overdrill all of the through-holes yourself before putting it in the water. Just a fact of life. If it's just one or two spots, it's neither a hard job nor an expensive one. On the other end of the spectrum, I recored over 1/3 of the deck on #1155 and it took me almost 2 years (although I had absolutely no clue what I was doing when I started). PM if you want to talk details- I can tell you exactly how *not* to do it :)

$2700 is a pretty good starting point for an older boat, especially if it has a trailer and some sails... But I will say that there are tons on the market right now at all different prices, so make sure you do some research before making an offer on any boat: https://sailingforums.com/forums/J24-For-Sale

Edited to add: as a general rule, rot in the deck wouldn't scare me away unless it is extensive. Rot in the hull is another story altogether. If you can't bring a moisture meter, bring a rock hammer and tap out the entire boat.

A good rule of thumb is that it's going to cost you $10k to get the boat to point where it can be competitive in one design regattas nationally, plus or minus a bit. You can either spend that on the boat upfront or you can buy a cheap one and upgrade it, but you'll pay it eventually. But if you just want a good PHRF boat, you can spend a lot less than that.

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Just saw the Craigslist ad in question over in the dinghy forum. Yes, if it were my money, I would go check it out. Not saying it's a winner for sure, but it looks like it has potential. Probably a mid-80s build. May be post-vermiculite given that it has the newer cabin hatches, but maybe not givent that it still has lazarettes. To make it competitive, you'll want to get a bottom job done and start swapping out some of the vintage hardware, but it could be a good starting point.

If you get a hull number for it, let me know and I can ask a measurer if it has a measurement certificate.

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5 hours ago, J24TrickBag said:

All J/24s will eventually need deck recoring to some degree or other, unless you go buy a factory 5000 series and overdrill all of the through-holes yourself before putting it in the water. Just a fact of life. If it's just one or two spots, it's neither a hard job nor an expensive one. On the other end of the spectrum, I recored over 1/3 of the deck on #1155 and it took me almost 2 years (although I had absolutely no clue what I was doing when I started). PM if you want to talk details- I can tell you exactly how *not* to do it :)

$2700 is a pretty good starting point for an older boat, especially if it has a trailer and some sails... But I will say that there are tons on the market right now at all different prices, so make sure you do some research before making an offer on any boat: https://sailingforums.com/forums/J24-For-Sale

Edited to add: as a general rule, rot in the deck wouldn't scare me away unless it is extensive. Rot in the hull is another story altogether. If you can't bring a moisture meter, bring a rock hammer and tap out the entire boat.

A good rule of thumb is that it's going to cost you $10k to get the boat to point where it can be competitive in one design regattas nationally, plus or minus a bit. You can either spend that on the boat upfront or you can buy a cheap one and upgrade it, but you'll pay it eventually. But if you just want a good PHRF boat, you can spend a lot less than that.

And then there is the verm, soft mast, old blocks, sails, chubby keel, water filled rudder, center seam, rotten bulkhead, sink drain, rotten floor, cockpit lazarets, but some of the most bang-for-the-buck-sailing you will ever find. This weekend's regatta at our club saw four J24s tied for first after day one.

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16 hours ago, Varan said:

And then there is the verm, soft mast, old blocks, sails, chubby keel, water filled rudder, center seam, rotten bulkhead, sink drain, rotten floor, cockpit lazarets, but some of the most bang-for-the-buck-sailing you will ever find. This weekend's regatta at our club saw four J24s tied for first after day one.

It's a boat. Something is always wrong with it...

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On 9/8/2020 at 2:26 PM, J24TrickBag said:

All J/24s will eventually need deck recoring to some degree or other, unless you go buy a factory 5000 series and overdrill all of the through-holes yourself before putting it in the water. Just a fact of life. If it's just one or two spots, it's neither a hard job nor an expensive one. On the other end of the spectrum, I recored over 1/3 of the deck on #1155 and it took me almost 2 years (although I had absolutely no clue what I was doing when I started). PM if you want to talk details- I can tell you exactly how *not* to do it :)

Edited to add: as a general rule, rot in the deck wouldn't scare me away unless it is extensive. Rot in the hull is another story altogether. If you can't bring a moisture meter, bring a rock hammer and tap out the entire boat.

Depends where the boat lives / has been stored.

My 1970s J24 is dry as a bone, but it's in Southern California where most boats bake in the sun all day. A drop of water doesn't last long out here.

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7 hours ago, JBOATTROUBLEMAKER said:

It's a boat. Something is always wrong with it...

That's the right attitude. The verm can be awful, but then again, some old verm-filled boats are still dry and it doesn't matter. (I just got done racing on one tonight, and it does just fine.) Same with the sink drain- no big deal. Squishy masts and rudders can happen on any boat of that vintage, so nothing new there. Can't say I've ever encountered one with a center seam issue, so I'm not sure how widespread that problem is. The bulkhead and rotten floors are problems but both are solvable.

Bottom line is any boat of the same vintage is going to come with it's own share of issues. These boats did/do have their share of maintenance problems, but at least with the J/24 you get a huge, active community of owners that have seen and fixed them all. Go into it with open eyes, a plan, and a budget and it'll be fine.

Again, not saying that this boat is "the one", but it's worth checking out.

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