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what-peterson.jpg

Spotted in Los Angeles and our guess is that is a Peterson 48 that never got finished. Might be a bit smaller, but we guess that we're pretty close. Anybody know what it actually is and what the story is? Click away.

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Doesn't look big enough for a 48.  And the coach-roof looks RP-ish.

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1 hour ago, some dude said:

Looks like Apogee. Hope not. 

Milt & Marty's Apogee?  I thought that was a tiller boat?

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Several Petersons had that little cabin pop-up.  Looks like a 40'-42' two-tonner to me, but the angle could be deceiving.  No idea which one. 

48'ers typically had a pedestal winch for the headsails.

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1 hour ago, some dude said:

Looks like Apogee. Hope not. 

Not, Apogee didn't have a wheel.

ApogeeBBS1982.jpg

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11 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Milt & Marty's Apogee?  I thought that was a tiller boat?

It was, but its 40 years later, young man, and lots of misguided restos include wheel additions

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3 minutes ago, vdm said:

Not, Apogee didn't have a wheel.

ApogeeBBS1982.jpg

She didn't in 1982, who knows about now.  Wheel in the pic doesn't look like OEM

 

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1 minute ago, some dude said:

its 40 years later

What?!  How can that be?????

It does sorta look like one of the Choate-built Peterson-42s.  Geronimo, Mini-X-Pres, there were a handful of others in SoCal.

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11 minutes ago, sledracr said:

What?!  How can that be?????

It does sorta look like one of the Choate-built Peterson-42s.  Geronimo, Mini-X-Pres, there were a handful of others in SoCal.

Same thing happened to me. Poof.  40 years.  Well, there have been a lot of adventures along the way

Could be one of those too.  I think Geronimo went to Chicago once upon a time.  And Apogee was a Jeremy Rogers/Eclipse sister IIRC.  Man, those brain cells are more resilient than I thought.  

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Could be just about anything from that era; agree it looks in the 40-45 foot range.  Looks a bit slab sided for a Peterson though.

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The boat in the photo is the Peterson 42.5 "Apollo V". She has shed her 80's paint job, switched from tiller to wheel, modified rig and will be receiving other modifications in the coming future.

 

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5 hours ago, sailingjunkiexl said:

Peterson 42.5 "Apollo V"

Cool!  was a good boat back in the day, glad to see her on a good path

914715782_6_AdmiralsCupTrials1981Apollo_2CFurey.jpg.309c8616c82e45e84c03adaec7e515c1.jpg

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5 hours ago, sailingjunkiexl said:

The boat in the photo is the Peterson 42.5 "Apollo V". She has shed her 80's paint job, switched from tiller to wheel, modified rig and will be receiving other modifications in the coming future.

 

this one?: https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/18289?fbclid=IwAR1QSRbjFpoGQoPZAIeAnj2Wd5Sf8MGiX7wD-CEx71bDlEqFlu7plm74HGc

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Wow. That coming future came fast.

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40 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

Those “stripes”

Those “short shorts”

That “cocaine”

do you mean the powder extinguishers were not all filled to stop a fire? 

image.png.64fd65630e9b7b51c3d437c75eecc7de.png

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^^^ it always cracks me up to see the things brokers include in listings. 

It's amazing to me that the boat has a battery switch, that's really rare (!), but what really makes this a compelling deal is the shop-vac....

 

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3 minutes ago, sledracr said:

^^^ it always cracks me up to see the things brokers include in listings. 

It's amazing to me that the boat has a battery switch, that's really rare (!), but what really makes this a compelling deal is the shop-vac....

 

enough winches to service...

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It is interesting to watch to (slow) progress being made over the past year or so.

The new double spreader mast with uppers out to new chainplates on the rail is an interesting alteration.

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Ahoy, mateys! As Sailingjunkiexl correctly identified, she was Apollo V, a foam-cored monocoque Kevlar 42.5’ IOR racer, built for Alan Bond. I bought her three years ago and am rebuilding her into a wicked fast cruiser. 

She was abandoned, derelict and close to being destroyed when I bought her: Paint peeling off in giant pieces, dead engine, horrifying corrosion issues throughout her rig, electrical system entirely corroded, dead and a product of BillyBob and many other issues. She’s repowered, has a nice new electrical system, water system, modern galley (I laughed seeing that old galley was bragged about by that broker! It would have looked primitive in a Cal 20!), rerigged into a 19/20th fractional and soon I’ll have her split backstay (she used to have a single backstay) in... after installing another cabinet. This much stiffer rig gets rid of the old running backstays and the baby stay, making her a lot easier and safer to sail single-handed.  I have renamed her Umkhonto.

I’m delighted to see such interest in her. I am a 100 ton master, ABYC certified electrical tech and a boatwright. I work on her when I’m not working on other boats to pay my bills and that’s why her rebirth is slow. It’s steady though and I hope to have her sailing soon. Her project list is vast, with two more extended haulouts coming up. Please feel free to ask me any questions about my lady. I’m thoroughly in love with her.

One correction: As she now carries a rig cut down from one a larger race boat (Amazing Grace) replaced and for a variety of reasons it was not possible to shorten her spreaders and alter the rig that way, her rig is overall 2’ wider than her old, narrower racing rig. Her new chainplates attach to bulkheads I rebuilt for this purpose, at 14” inboard.

691D435B-6F51-453D-9657-5A99F269E6C0.jpeg

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PS - I would love to know more of Apollo V’s history and would welcome any tidbits anyone could share, so please feel free to write me a note. Thanks!

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10 hours ago, CaptainJerr said:

Apollo V’s history

I only know the distant view of the string of Apollo boats

1, 2 and 3 were Miller/Lexcen designs IIRC
4 was the Peterson-46, ex Williwaw
5 was an evolution of the Serendipity-43 design
6 was another Lexcen boat... but he'd sort of lost contact with IOR by then, so it wasn't great.

IMO, 5 was the best (and most competitive, on the global stage) of the bunch.

I think there's an archived thread around here that goes into the history some.

edited to add: found it 

 

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On 9/10/2020 at 7:04 AM, Al Paca said:

Those “stripes”

Those “short shorts”

That “cocaine”

When the bowguy said "I'm going down below to find another line", it didn't mean that you should expect to see a new spin sheet to get rigged anytime soon.

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On 9/9/2020 at 12:15 PM, Editor said:

what-peterson.jpg

Spotted in Los Angeles and our guess is that is a Peterson 48 that never got finished. Might be a bit smaller, but we guess that we're pretty close. Anybody know what it actually is and what the story is? Click away.

My dad bought the boat from Alan Bond, and he raced it (I crewed) in San Diego from around (these dates are approx.) 1981-1986  in the IOR fleet against Eclipse (Bannish), Cadenza (Eichenlaub), Reliance (Conner) and did ok for having amateur crew. I think there were a couple of years when we placed 2nd or 3rd for the high point. The boat went on two Transpacs (not the best design for that race) , with the delivery driver grounding it on the end of Point Loma one of the times coming back, which made the local news. We had a pretty good time on that boat, and I think we may have had somewhat of a reputation as a party crew. I have stories about the boat and can give you some more detailed history if you want to get a hold of me outside the confines of the site.

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1 hour ago, Blind Squirrel Scott said:

My dad bought the boat from Alan Bond, and he raced it (I crewed) in San Diego from around (these dates are approx.) 1981-1986  in the IOR fleet against Eclipse (Bannish), Cadenza (Eichenlaub), Reliance (Conner) and did ok for having amateur crew. I think there were a couple of years when we placed 2nd or 3rd for the high point. The boat went on two Transpacs (not the best design for that race) , with the delivery driver grounding it on the end of Point Loma one of the times coming back, which made the local news. We had a pretty good time on that boat, and I think we may have had somewhat of a reputation as a party crew. I have stories about the boat and can give you some more detailed history if you want to get a hold of me outside the confines of the site.

Would appreciate the boat stories be posted here :)

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1 hour ago, climenuts said:

Would appreciate the boat stories be posted here :)

So, here is my version of the time the delivery driver was bringing the boat back to San Diego after the Transpac (I think 1983 if that is a valid year) and ran it aground on the reef at the end of Point Loma: I was living in OB at the time, and doing my party thing, and I get a call about 3AM in the morning from my Dad, and he said I had to come out immediately to the end of the point by the light house. I had probably gone to bed a couple hours before that, but I drug (no pun intended) myself out there. It was obviously still dark, but there were cars pulled up to the edge of the cliff with there lights pointing seaward, and I was told that we needed to unload everything (I mean everything, all sails, stove, etc) off the boat, as we needed the boat as light as possible and were going to try to pull the boat off at high tide.  There was a train of people helping out, some walking out to the boat on the reef, some handing gear up the cliff, some loading trucks, and some just generally helping out. The boat was high and dry when we were getting the gear off, so that was good. Somebody inspected the hull, and said it was ok, probably because it was Kevlar. When it started getting light, we were able to see that the tide had come back in some, and that the boat was starting to float a bit. News of the incident had gotten out (local morning news on all networks), and I remember these guys that worked for different salvage companies handing my dad slips of paper with their bids on them. My dad had already decided to F the salvage guys, and we were going to try to pull the boat off the reef, and he hired a tug boat for the task. I guess since I had surfed the "Little Waimea" reef since I was young, was a pretty good swimmer and a big strapping young man, I was told to swim out to the boat and attach the tow line. I forget who came out with me, but it was one of our other crew members. The thing about getting the tow line hooked up that I didn't realize at the time, was that the tender from the tug boat could not carry the actual 1" or so  tow line to the Apollo. It must have been to big and heavy. Instead, they tied a ski rope leader to the tow line and said we had to winch the 1" tow line from the tug boat to the Apollo, using our main winch. Unfortunately, the reef is very long at the end of the point, and the tug boat was like a half mile away. I remember winching in that f'ing ski line, with the other guy tailing, racing the clock to make it by high tide, with the boat rising up with each wave  and then slamming down violently on the hard reef, thinking to myself that there was no way we were going to get the real tow line to the boat on time, and there was really no way the boat was going not going to sink. It was just taking a beating. After an hour or so of frantic and extremely difficult grinding, we got the leader winched in, got the actual tow line hooked up, jumped off the boat, and swam back to shore right about at high tide. We watched as the tug boat started pulling the boat off the reef, and it kind of slid sideways a little, dropped into a deeper spot in the reef, and somehow tracked through the reef without even a shudder.  When the boat was hauled, I was told the boat's keel and rudder were wrecked on the bottom, the rig had to be replaced because of all the shock, and there was a small hole in the side, but all in all she came off the reef in good shape. A miracle, really.

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