Raptorsailor

Jules Verne Trophy 2020

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Re the team makeup/ spirit mentioned on the previous page, caught this snippet thanks to a Tip & Shaft tip.

Quote

Charles Caudrelier, how did you put together your crew? What were the criteria?

Well for Franck I had to, otherwise… (laughs). Quite simply for the criteria; first of all, the weight of a team member is quite heavy, all inclusive is about 150 kg, so that counts.

And how important is the weight on a world tour?

Well yes, to the point of wondering: after all, do we need to be so many on the bridge? Finally, Francis Joyon made it to six. And our boat, Gitana 17, is no more complicated to navigate than Idec. And, in addition, we have already done it together on the Brest Atlantiques and we were almost able to maneuver it fully, and it is especially on the maneuvers that we may need people, but at the same time we We only have four winch columns… So four on the columns, one on the sheets and one at the helm, and we manage to fill the boat… So, six, that seemed good to us.

You also took into account the human factor, as you did in the Volvo Ocean Race with Dongfeng…

Yes, we wanted to go with a nice group. Franck had suffered a little from the atmosphere on Groupama during the Volvo Ocean race, when he really appreciated his Jules-Verne trophies, because he was with people he appreciated, it had served as a lesson. Cohesion and atmosphere in a group is essential.

gtrans from ouest-france but clear enough. Odd--don't recall "Franck had suffered a little from the atmosphere on Groupama" in the 2012 VOR

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22 minutes ago, stief said:

Re the team makeup/ spirit mentioned on the previous page, caught this snippet thanks to a Tip & Shaft tip.

gtrans from ouest-france but clear enough. Odd--don't recall "Franck had suffered a little from the atmosphere on Groupama" in the 2012 VOR

Sounds like another way to say he felt there were too many cooks in the kitchen

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2 minutes ago, ctutmark said:

Sounds like another way to say he felt there were too many cooks in the kitchen

French cooks? j/k. 

True, always an issue getting the best talent together. 

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We all miss Fralo’s terrific site which succinctly summarized Jules Verne attempts as well as related information such as Fosset’s and Garbart’s circumnavigations.

Below are the relevant times with the fastest intermediate reference times highlighted.

image.thumb.png.57bac90ce196044e7ff767c797b400a4.png

 

The chart below identifies fastest leg.  If you string all of the fastest legs together, you are looking at theoretical 38 day circumnavigation.  Of course, it doesn’t work that way …

 

image.png

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3 hours ago, yl75 said:

Ok ! :), but then how did you know they caught something in their rudder ? (which of them ?)

I think it was in the 1 hour long video Gitana did the day after the start

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The decision to turn back really hasn’t been an easy one to make. It was carefully thought out and all the different parties involved in the project were consulted and the crew made the decision. It is motivated by two elements: the incident that occurred yesterday and the technical consequences discovered this afternoon, together with the quality of the window we’ve enlisted in. Indeed, day after day, our weather observations are confirming that the South Atlantic will not be showing us her best side, with a Saint Helena High that is a long way south, forcing us not just to take a big detour around the outside but also to plunge deep into the south to round the Cape of Good Hope. Even though the routing is still giving us a passage within the record time, we know that such a feat would require us to be at our full potential, which unfortunately is no longer the case. Turning back today means we can quickly return to our technical base, effect the necessary repairs and then very quickly get back on standby ready to set sail again this winter to conquer the Jules Verne Trophy”,  concluded Cyril Dardashti. 

Damage seems repairable. IDEC bailed out due to weather being not as good as predicted before smashing the record later that year.

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MERDE!!!

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"The Gitana Team wish the crew of Sodebo every success with their attempt."

I like the last line of the press release.  Shows a lot of class to say that under the current circumstances.  Hopefully they can find a good window for another go soon.

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Truth be told Franck didn't seem to like having Sodebo there. He really had no interest in a match race.

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22 minutes ago, t.rex said:

Sodebo hauling the mail right now, boatspeed 33 knots in 17 knots of wind. Should be close for the equator record (4 days 20 hours).

https://tropheejulesverne.sodebo.com/mediatheque/#cartographie

Looks close indeed. ~26h hrs to do 650 nm. Needs to average about 25 kts. Route seems to be shooting for a bridge forecasted in about 18 hrs

2113133545_ScreenShot2020-11-28at10_38_32AM.png.8224a1100708f618be1e93c51b578e92.png

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This is much more active and up to date than the one on the Multihull Anarchy page.  I wish there was a way to merge the two threads.  Thanks for getting this started and current.

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Coville does mention crossing the equator in this latest vid. In the subtitles, it says taken at 10:37 UTC when they were around the Cape Verdes, and expecting to cross at 11 PM or later tonight. Not sure if he is talking about crossing the doldrums or the equator.  Either way, one of the crew is expecting a haircut for the crossing.

 

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Coville does mention crossing the equator in this latest vid. In the subtitles, it says taken at 10:37 UTC when they were around the Cape Verdes, and expecting to cross at 11 PM or later tonight. Not sure if he is talking about crossing the doldrums or the equator.  Either way, one of the crew is expecting a haircut for the crossing.

 

He is saying "we will rzach the Doldrum towards the end of the day and hoping to cross the Equador around 11pm".

I Thomas Rouxel is expecting a haircut, but he is defo not a rookie, so I am thinking it doesn't have anything to do with King Neptune

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It looks like it's going to get a bit light South of the convergence zone for a few hours (and close hauled), so I don't know if they'll match the record but they should be pretty close...

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Pardon the Safari auto-translate, but the spirit of this message from Coville to Franck comes through well enough.

Quote

Yesterday I lay next to the card table to recover from this passage, from the gybe that would almost decide on our passage in 2 days from the pot to the dark, when I hear that it speaks loudly. Big news!
"They turn around... They touched...". It doesn't take me very long to understand. A few tens of miles behind us, the incident happened to them. The one we all fear. The one you don't even wish for your worst opponent for having already suffered it many times. Damage that eliminates without option or so rarely.
Navigating with Franck was one of my greatest chances, competing against him is a privilege that requires being at his best.

Greetings, Franck, Charles, Erwan, Yann, David, Morgan. I keep for myself this image of this sublime trimaran flying over the water, which exudes such power. This extraordinary boat that inspires us all. Without a doubt, you will return, I wish you.

Thomas, off Cape Verde

https://tropheejulesverne.sodebo.com/actualites/le-mot-du-bord-de-thomas-coville/

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Uh oh. 
looks like Sodebo has slowed to 11 knots and heading dead downwind. 
I hope they don’t have damage of some sort. 

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They're close to the transition zone , so could just be local weather like a cloud. The Sodebo tracker's forecasted weather is only ~7 kts,Sodebo is DDW, so will have to wait for the next update (50 mins?) to see if anything changes.

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I suspect just the convergence zone biting them. All you can do is pick the narrowest part and do your best through it.

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Sounds like they don't think they can beat the record, but maybe get the 2nd or 3rd best time.

 

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As much as it is to break all these sub records during the attempt, it is the overall Jules Verne record that matters.  Keep making excellent happen!

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They like using reference time, but expect to regain the 'lead' over IDEC within a few days. Slowdown explained too.

Quote

And indeed, the Pot-au-noir is not obvious to Thomas Coville and his seven teammates, who for a few hours have seen their forward slowed, losing part of their lead on the marching board of Idec Sport, holder of the Jules Verne Trophy (125 miles Sunday at 8am). But once out of the zone, probably during the day, Sodebo Ultim 3 will regain speed to switch, next night, to the Southern Hemisphere, after more or less 5 days at sea. The reference time at the equator is held by Spindrift 2 in 4 days 19 hours and 57 minutes (January 2019), while Idec Sport took 5 days 18 hours and 59 minutes during its victorious Jules Verne four years ago.

more at https://tropheejulesverne.sodebo.com/actualites/jour-5-lequateur-en-vue/

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10 jibes in the past few hours. 
That’s gotta take some effort! At least they’re back up to 17 knots...

F7992DD9-BE05-4949-ACCC-3A252CB20B34.jpeg

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Gitana was saying they didn't really like the south atlantic forecast and were always ready to go back home.

I wonder whether these bad doldrums + that not so good south atlantic will mean Sodebo will give up or not.

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50 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Gitana was saying they didn't really like the south atlantic forecast and were always ready to go back home.

I wonder whether these bad doldrums + that not so good south atlantic will mean Sodebo will give up or not.

Coville has the last word... they are working as hell, alltough objetively does not look very promising. The whole southern record run of IDEC raised up the bar quite high, and with the increasing debris in the ocean is going to be more and more difficult to achieve... we'll see

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10 minutes ago, Rafael said:

The whole southern record run of IDEC raised up the bar quite high

This is why the North and South Atlantic going down and the South and North Atlantic going up matter so much ... from Cape of Good Hope to Cape Horn there are potentially no real gains to be had until these boats are reliably fully foiling in fresh conditions for their entire run in the South.  Just coming close to matching Francis' Southern Ocean run would be a most impressive feat.  Think 85 home runs in a season, or 145 goals in the NHL, or running for 2,700 yards in the NFL.  That is what Francis did down there on an old boat with 5 other guys ...

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Turning back is always an option. Question is what their other goals are.
The foils are still new, the boat not much older. How much do they value time in all conditions over the record? Does the pressure form the record help them to learn the boat faster?

Looks like they are still stuck in the doldrums.

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14 minutes ago, Chasm said:

Looks like they are still stuck in the doldrums.

Last hour sub 10 kts. 

Latest speed 5 mins ago 5.5kts cog 263 .

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Nélias is getting a better look at the Cape Town train schedule, so unless something bizarre happens, like getting Charaled, expect they'll decide to pull the trigger or not between 10 and 20 ºS.

(vaguely recalling what Franck, Guichard, and others have said in the past about routing for the JVT.)

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Reminder to self. Tracker updates at the top of the hour (not every hour of the race timer) , reporting positions 15 min earlier. 

Quote

Tableau de bord, dimanche 29 Nov18:45
Mise à jour toutes les heures
Prochaine mise à jour: 20h

Tableau de bord dimanche 29 Nov19:45
Mise à jour toutes les heures
Prochaine mise à jour: 21h

Gybe last sked explains the low reported speeds, and the forecast looks like they should be sensing the trades now.

982250504_ScreenShot2020-11-29at1_16_23PM.png.ce1abb5cfda51fd14346bd8e78816e20.png

Edited by stief
wrong screenie

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1 hour ago, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

This is why the North and South Atlantic going down and the South and North Atlantic going up matter so much ... from Cape of Good Hope to Cape Horn there are potentially no real gains to be had until these boats are reliably fully foiling in fresh conditions for their entire run in the South.  Just coming close to matching Francis' Southern Ocean run would be a most impressive feat.  Think 85 home runs in a season, or 145 goals in the NHL, or running for 2,700 yards in the NFL.  That is what Francis did down there on an old boat with 5 other guys ...

For sure Joyon and his gang had a totally amazing run from before good hope to almost NZ on the same low (or two of them),  and they were also very lucky in the north Atlantic back, but what is also impressive, is that Gabart alone still has 3 over six sub records, including the South Pacific one :

Parcours Date Temps Skipper Équipage Bateau
Ouessant-Équateur 2019 4 j 19 h 57 min Yann Guichard 14 personnes Maxi Spindrift 2
Équateur-Cap des Aiguilles 2017 6 j 01 h 35 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Océan Indien WSSRC 2016 5 j 21 h 09 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport
Océan Pacifique WSSRC 2017 7 j 15 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Cap Horn-Équateur 2017 6 j 22 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Équateur-Ouessant 2017 5 j 19 h 21 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trophée_Jules-Verne#Récapitulatif_des_records_intermédiaires

 

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7 minutes ago, yl75 said:

For sure Joyon and his gang had a totally amazing run from before good hope to almost NZ on the same low (or two of them),  and they were also very lucky in the north Atlantic back, but what is also impressive, is that Gabart alone still has 3 over six sub records, including the South Pacific one :

Parcours Date Temps Skipper Équipage Bateau
Ouessant-Équateur 2019 4 j 19 h 57 min Yann Guichard 14 personnes Maxi Spindrift 2
Équateur-Cap des Aiguilles 2017 6 j 01 h 35 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Océan Indien WSSRC 2016 5 j 21 h 09 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport
Océan Pacifique WSSRC 2017 7 j 15 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Cap Horn-Équateur 2017 6 j 22 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Équateur-Ouessant 2017 5 j 19 h 21 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trophée_Jules-Verne#Récapitulatif_des_records_intermédiaires

 

If I remember well; Gabart was still in it to beat the overall record until he had to go round the Azores high

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1 hour ago, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

This is why the North and South Atlantic going down and the South and North Atlantic going up matter so much ... from Cape of Good Hope to Cape Horn there are potentially no real gains to be had until these boats are reliably fully foiling in fresh conditions for their entire run in the South.  Just coming close to matching Francis' Southern Ocean run would be a most impressive feat.  Think 85 home runs in a season, or 145 goals in the NHL, or running for 2,700 yards in the NFL.  That is what Francis did down there on an old boat with 5 other guys ...

Yes I agree, every mile is key, in the Atlantic but also Indian and Pacific (all with the UFO collision unpredicted variable set to 0% for the three Oceans)

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8 minutes ago, yl75 said:

For sure Joyon and his gang had a totally amazing run from before good hope to almost NZ on the same low (or two of them),  and they were also very lucky in the north Atlantic back, but what is also impressive, is that Gabart alone still has 3 over six sub records, including the South Pacific one :

Parcours Date Temps Skipper Équipage Bateau
Ouessant-Équateur 2019 4 j 19 h 57 min Yann Guichard 14 personnes Maxi Spindrift 2
Équateur-Cap des Aiguilles 2017 6 j 01 h 35 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Océan Indien WSSRC 2016 5 j 21 h 09 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport
Océan Pacifique WSSRC 2017 7 j 15 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Cap Horn-Équateur 2017 6 j 22 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Équateur-Ouessant 2017 5 j 19 h 21 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trophée_Jules-Verne#Récapitulatif_des_records_intermédiaires

 

Impressive by all means, mindblowing should I say (hard to understand why he has yet no sponsor today...)

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32 minutes ago, yl75 said:

For sure Joyon and his gang had a totally amazing run from before good hope to almost NZ on the same low (or two of them),  and they were also very lucky in the north Atlantic back, but what is also impressive, is that Gabart alone still has 3 over six sub records, including the South Pacific one :

Parcours Date Temps Skipper Équipage Bateau
Ouessant-Équateur 2019 4 j 19 h 57 min Yann Guichard 14 personnes Maxi Spindrift 2
Équateur-Cap des Aiguilles 2017 6 j 01 h 35 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Océan Indien WSSRC 2016 5 j 21 h 09 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport
Océan Pacifique WSSRC 2017 7 j 15 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Cap Horn-Équateur 2017 6 j 22 h 15 min François Gabart Solitaire MACIF
Équateur-Ouessant 2017 5 j 19 h 21 min Francis Joyon 6 personnes IDEC sport

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trophée_Jules-Verne#Récapitulatif_des_records_intermédiaires

 

 

On 11/27/2020 at 11:56 AM, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

We all miss Fralo’s terrific site which succinctly summarized Jules Verne attempts as well as related information such as Fosset’s and Garbart’s circumnavigations.

Below are the relevant times with the fastest intermediate reference times highlighted.

image.thumb.png.57bac90ce196044e7ff767c797b400a4.png

 

The chart below identifies fastest leg.  If you string all of the fastest legs together, you are looking at theoretical 38 day circumnavigation.  Of course, it doesn’t work that way …

 

image.png

You are quite the student of the game and an astute observer … I only wish I had created a chart that accurately displayed each leg’s best speed in comparison the others to illustrate points such as those  … say in post Number 205 …

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{"LAT":"4.313795","LON":"-27.77623","SPEED":"150","COURSE":"212","HEADING":"212","ELAPSED":"6","SHIPNAME":"[SAT-AIS]","SHIPTYPE":"9","SHIP_ID":"T0RnNE9Ua3hPRGc0T1RreE9EZzRPUT09LUV2TUdSNy8weE14WUVUUXJscWEvZXc9PQ==","TYPE_IMG":"9","TYPE_NAME":"Pleasure Craft","STATUS_NAME":"Underway by Sail"}

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15 hours ago, stief said:

Sounds like they don't think they can beat the record, but maybe get the 2nd or 3rd best time.

 

Not exactly, he is saying that he is currently holder of the 2 best times from Ushant to Equator (he was on Spindrift, for sure, and from the top of my head, don't remember which boat has the second best time...)

So he hopes that they will have at least the 3rd best time so he can claim he has the 3 best times to the equator!

He then explains that a few hours difference going through the Doldrums can either have not much impact if that does not change which weather system they latch on, in the South Atlantic, or it could make a massive difference if it makes them miss a weather system by a few hours...

From the map on their official website, the South Atlantic looks "complicated" to say the least...

 

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14 hours ago, stief said:

Window caulking. Sikafelx, I think.

 

Yes, Sikaflex, replacing a window...

The crew talking at 1:58 is saying "Carglass répare, Carglass remplace", which is a famous advertisement jingle from a windshield repair company in France. That makes the other guy chuckle...

And he adds, "we are sending our best technicians on the job; they are masters of Sikaflex...."

In another video, one of the crew explained that they do the daily checks inside the amas by night, for cracks or water intrusion, because it is too hot inside the amas during the day. You can see crews checking equipment earlier in the video above.

And just for the fun of it, I just discovered that Carglass is a very international company...

 

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1 hour ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Jibing a dozen times requires high confidence in your routing decisions 

Tacks, not jibes. In the last article (in French) on the official web site, they explain that the first part of the Doldrums was what they were most concerned about, and it was all hands on deck to deal with sail adjustments/changes. But once they got through this area, they ended up with light winds, right on the nose. So they started a series of tacks. The wind was a bit more stable, and there was no risks of capsize by a sudden gust, so they went back to a more normal shift set up.

They are now through and are accelerating and hope to cross the Equator after about 5 1/2 days. With a few hours ahead of IDEC. During its record, IDEC encountered the Doldrums much more further South than normal, so as Sodebo is accelerating, IDEC was actually slowing down; so Sodebo should be able to catch up on the deficit they have right now in comparison to IDEC.

 

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I predict a crossing at around 11:30 UTC - 4h from now.

They are 83nm away, at latitude 1.38deg, longitude -29.28, at course 210 (+-5), doing 20 (+- 2) knots.

Ais reception is right now excellent, update comes every 5 minutes.

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Thanks Laurent for making the language subtleties clear. Again. Makes following the races here so much better.

And noaano--nice call. With your work (AIS sat tracking), and Kevin Saliou's (weather routing), the pieces are coming together for a  better tracker. 

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Safari trans. crossed in 5 d 9 h 50m

Quote

Starting last Wednesday at 2:55 a.m. on the assault on the Jules Verne Trophy, Sodebo Ultim 3 crossed the equator on Monday at 12:45 p.m. after 5 days 9 a.m. and 50 minutes at sea. Thomas Coville and his seven teammates were 9 hours and 21 minutes ahead of the walking board of Idec Sport, holder of the record, when they switched to the Southern Hemisphere.

So congrats. They did indeed make that podium, despite the setbacks. And they've advanced against IDEC.

Skipper Date Equator                
Yann Guichard 2015 4 d 21 h 29 min R                
Francis Joyon 2015 5 d 05 h 01 min                
Loïck Peyron 2011 5 d 14 h 55 min
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UTC 1130

LAT/LON:      -7.997018      -33.133670      

SPD/DHG:    27.6    195

Last hour solid 28kts ish, max 29.9kts.

 

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UTC 1430

LAT/LON:     -9.305      -33.357    

SPD/DHG:    31.4    191

Last hour solid 27kts ish, max 31.4kts.

232nm behind Charal and thus VG fleet. Looks like they are onboard the same southbound train.

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I hear there is a very talented crew looking for a ride a bit further along their path. 

Sure hope some of the Vendée boats can capture pictures of her as she blasts through the fleet (and vice versa).

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39 minutes ago, Varan said:

I hear there is a very talented crew looking for a ride a bit further along their path. 

You mean Alex? Or Jean now that his wine supply is under a "threat"? :) 

Not gonna happen, but how legendary would it be if they picked Kevin up for a ride back home.

Quote

Sure hope some of the Vendée boats can capture pictures of her as she blasts through the fleet (and vice versa).

Sure do - what a sight will that be! 

Pretty sure some of the passes happen within visual range.

Charal now 208nm away.

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That would be excellent to have on vid or photos going through the Vendee fleet.

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Looks like a smooth transition to that low in a couple days, they should be at least a day ahead of Idec by the time they are pointing straight East!

A repeat of this would be nice: 

 

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32 minutes ago, Geff said:

That would be excellent to have on vid or photos going through the Vendee fleet.

Like this one? Gitana in the VOR fleet

 

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6 minutes ago, stief said:

Like this one? Gitana in the VOR fleet

 

Exactly!  Thanks for rooting that out!

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Great videos.  It looks like Charal is coming up soon on Sodebo's bow right now, but the big trimaran is heading about 10 degrees further downwind, so unless the boats change course this first crossing may not be so close.  29 more chances though.

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10 hours ago, tama_manu said:

Great videos.  It looks like Charal is coming up soon on Sodebo's bow right now, but the big trimaran is heading about 10 degrees further downwind, so unless the boats change course this first crossing may not be so close.  29 more chances though.

 

Shame Charals AIS is transmitting so badly if at all, so we do not know for sure, but I estimate Charal to be at 33.78W and Sodebo at 33.87W when they crossed, that means distance of around 5 nm.

It happened around one hour ago I think, hard to tell exactly.

Now:

LAT/LON:    -17.184500      -33.878400   

SPD/DHG:    28.6    168

 

     

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8 minutes ago, noaano said:

 

Shame Charals AIS is transmitting so badly if at all, so we do not know for sure, but I estimate Charal to be at 33.78W and Sodebo at 33.87W when they crossed, that means distance of around 5 nm.

It happened around one hour ago I think, hard to tell exactly.

Now:

LAT/LON:    -17.184500      -33.878400   

SPD/DHG:    28.6    168

 

     

According to the Vendee tracker Charal is at about 33.47W.  I'm not claiming how accurate this is.

image.thumb.png.a7791eef1c6704b46965aee81f51da07.png

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1 hour ago, Tunnel Rat said:

According to the Vendee tracker Charal is at about 33.47W.  I'm not claiming how accurate this is.

She is now, but she was further towards Brazil when she was overtaken, this happened north of 17°S. The track is visible on tracker.

I zoomed in on the same tracker and on max zoom she was 2/5 division left of 33°45W -line towards 33°50W, so I estimated 47 minutes -> 33.78W decimal. Sodebo is real data from their GPS via AIS.

I estimate my 5nm separation "guess" is accurate to +-0.5nm or thereabouts.

Screen-Shot-2020-12-02-at-11-26-11.png

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Ah. Hopeful. Laughed at the description in the YT page "English version of Sam Goodchild's interview, the only non-french onboard ;)"

Sam not expecting a turn-back call. They expect to continue past the trigger point in the  low forecasted.

Quote

 [01:48]  So for the next week or so it's the transition into the southern ocean. Right now the trade winds we have got to get into the southern ocean and pick into a low system off the south of Brazil. That's generally a little bit complicated. At the moment the routing is showing that it should be fine: we just have to be careful and keep the boat going as fast as we can to make sure we make that transition wel,l and then within a week's time we're going to be south of South Africa and quite deep into the southern ocean.

 

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Cockpit is definitely a culmination of both Gitana and Sodebo. 

Arms have that same foil treatment Gitana went to in mods.

Main is almost flush with the deck (they did that on IX).

 

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14 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Thanks. Couldn't tell from the overview vid what this design hopes to advance over others (besides flying foils and rudders). Main hull underwater profile? 

edit. Ah--maybe cockpit. Tks TPG

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I doubt we'll know anything about the hull form or foils until she's out of the shed. Is there any information sharing out of the Gitana or Sodebo sheds back to the designers? Its such a small group of boats, I can't help but wonder if that information is shared to help push the (tiny) class. Atleast safety wise etc (foil controls and whatnot)

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Looking at the weather forecast, it seems that Sodebo's bet is going to pay off, it seems they have an ideal timing to catch a southern depresssion...

I guess Gitana is already back home... they must be boiling looking at this !!

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42 minutes ago, thibnico said:

Looking at the weather forecast, it seems that Sodebo's bet is going to pay off, it seems they have an ideal timing to catch a southern depresssion...

I guess Gitana is already back home... they must be boiling looking at this !!

Agreed; they may have a slight slow down in the next 48 hrs, and a trickier patch to go through (don't fall in the wind hole on port) but then a large low pressure system coming off South America for what should be a fast ride towards Cap of Good Hope

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2 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

If you look at the aft beam, the wing profile stops at the beginning of the main traveler "beam". And closer to the center line, you have the roof of the cockpit, caressing the boom...

Would the next aerodynamic drag reduction effort be to close and put a roof on that whole area between the aft beam and the traveler? You could have a smooth aerodynamic shape, with the cockpit integrated into it, spanning the whole width of the boat.

Drawbacks:

  • more weight
  • difficulty to exit the cockpit to maneuver on deck?
  • more drag when heeled???

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Thanks. Couldn't tell from the overview vid what this design hopes to advance over others (besides flying foils and rudders). Main hull underwater profile? 

edit. Ah--maybe cockpit. Tks TPG

Interesting, the biggest difference that jumps at me is that the aft beam is much further forward, with the shrouds going straight to it and angled forward towards the center. Looks like a "return" to the "X" shaped beams some ormas had... Means the weight is more centered and there is also a lot less net, which must save quite a bit of drag.
This results in some long "unsupported" stern sections on the amas, but then again it seems to be the bows that fall of mostly (except for Sodebo in the Brest Atlantiques but the break was at the rudder shaft). Hard to tell here but maybe the front beam is a bit further forward on the amas as well (so the there isn't quite as much unsupported bow).

The bottom of the "cabin" seems open (nets only) on this rendering, presumably they would close that off so it stays sort of dry in there...

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42 minutes ago, Airwick said:

The bottom of the "cabin" seems open (nets only) on this rendering, presumably they would close that off so it stays sort of dry in there...

 I'm guessing (hoping) that's just the rendering. That would make the enclosed cockpit pointless. Leaving it open like that would create drag and weird wet vortexes in there.

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