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arneelof

Corsair f24

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Just boight a corsair f24 to use primarily for short trips in the Stockholm archipelago. Any advices (new to multihulls) are appreciated.

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Join the Fboats Groups.IO forum, heaps of info and like minds there. 

Peter H

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I’m stoked for you 

+1 plywoodboy

also

https://groups.io/g/F242owners

please keep posting your experiences 

I have a tri this size but due to Covid I haven’t even sailed it yet and so I’m living off every one else’s stories .

lol

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Had one for a dozen years and raced it.  Excellent boat-especially suited to new multihullers.  No need to reef hardly ever (OK to windward in winds about 30 kts).  A bit heavy for its size and performance suffers in under teen winds but it will still get you there.  You will need to practice tacks since it does require good timing to keep from getting into irons.  Boat is happiest at 10 kts boatspeed to weather (about 15 kts true wind).  Don't be afraid to fly the spin--most fun you can have with clothes on.  Have fun with it.  

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Just do it........these things are so solid that you can really push them. I singlehanded mine in Rhode Island for 8 years. Loved every minute of it.

The boats are overbuilt - and there is almost nothing I needed to do to keep it in good shape. 

You do want to make sure the shrouds are in good condition. The failure of either side or the front means that the mast comes down (in general). 

You want to watch my video - just because......

 

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On 9/20/2020 at 1:47 AM, arneelof said:

Just boight a corsair f24 to use primarily for short trips in the Stockholm archipelago. Any advices (new to multihulls) are appreciated.

I'm also a monohull convert and have found that our F-82R can be sailed exactly like a monohull, which is very conservative and safe approach, but not the fastest way to sail. In order to get the most out of the boat you need to sail fatter (i.e. reaching) angles, especially downwind, which also has the effect of "bending" the apparent wind forward as the boat accelerates. 

For example, let's say we round the windward mark pop the chute at around 150 degrees TWA = AWA. We could continue to sail like this and be perfectly safe but it's slow. So instead we'll head up to put the wind on the beam and the boat accelerates like crazy. We sheet in and the boat continues to accelerate, so we can also start to bear away from the true wind, but the apparent wind will stay well forward. Now the TWA is back down to 150 degrees but the AWA is now 60 degrees - 90 degrees forward of the TWA. We're also sailing along faster than the wind and twice as fast as the nearest monohull.

So for me the biggest difference from monohull sailing is detaching my mind from the true wind angle and speed, and understanding how to accelerate the boat and bending the apparent wind to or forward of the beam. In other words, a well-sailed multihull is almost always sailing upwind.

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19 hours ago, craigiri said:

Just do it........these things are so solid that you can really push them. I singlehanded mine in Rhode Island for 8 years. Loved every minute of it.

The boats are overbuilt - and there is almost nothing I needed to do to keep it in good shape. 

You do want to make sure the shrouds are in good condition. The failure of either side or the front means that the mast comes down (in general). 

You want to watch my video - just because......

 

 

Looke like fun.

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On 9/20/2020 at 4:47 PM, arneelof said:

Just boight a corsair f24 to use primarily for short trips in the Stockholm archipelago. Any advices (new to multihulls) are appreciated.

when you say F24, is it an original with the weird rudder?

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43 minutes ago, Sailabout said:

when you say F24, is it an original with the weird rudder?

It'd be much easier to identify the MkI by the fixed mast instead of rotating.  Or centerboard (swing down) instead of daggerboard. 

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10 hours ago, MultiThom said:

It'd be much easier to identify the MkI by the fixed mast instead of rotating.  Or centerboard (swing down) instead of daggerboard. 

ok thanks but then we have the Mk1 dash and the mk2 with new main hull deck then 760..
How many models before the Mk1 dash transom hung rudder and rotating mast etc?

so what models should we use the term F24 rather than Corsair 24?

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2 hours ago, Sailabout said:

ok thanks but then we have the Mk1 dash and the mk2 with new main hull deck then 760..
How many models before the Mk1 dash transom hung rudder and rotating mast etc?

so what models should we use the term F24 rather than Corsair 24?

F24 was only the original F24 MK 1 (fixed mast) and the other F24 was MK 2 (rotating mast from then on) but then Ian sold the rights to the F24 Mk2 to Corsair so some of the later hull numbers were Corsair 24 mk 2.  That happened early this century and the class made you put the nail in the coffin symbol instead of the F on the mainsail when you got a new sail....of course since I had an F24 Mk2 and I made my own sails, I still put the F on it--then I added a taller mast and it became a Thom24 :) with a Th on the sail.  All the dash and sprints and 750s and 760s are nails in the coffin boats (corsair).  I think it is pretty safe to generalize that if the length is in feet, you can call it an F boat.  If it is a meter related number, it is a nail in the coffin.

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13 hours ago, MultiThom said:

 I think it is pretty safe to generalize that if the length is in feet, you can call it an F boat.  If it is a meter related number, it is a nail in the coffin.

I think this may be true for Corsair-built boats, but not in general.

For example, the F-82, F-85 and F-9 variants are custom made F-boats (i.e. not made by Corsair).

And the F-32 and F-33 variants are also custom made F-boats (i.e. not made by Corsair). 

Finally the F-25C was a kit F-boat, with the hulls built by Colorado Composites and finishing done by the owner. 

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3 minutes ago, gspot said:

I think this may be true for Corsair-built boats, but not in general.

 

Yah, that is what we were discussing.  True that there are lots of F boats not built by corsair (well, not lots of them compared to coffin nail built boats)

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On 9/20/2020 at 1:47 AM, arneelof said:

Just boight a corsair f24 to use primarily for short trips in the Stockholm archipelago. Any advices (new to multihulls) are appreciated.

There's a guy with a Dash 750 where you sail... might want to buddy up.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=corsair+dash+750&docid=608008640303203319&mid=E4A38A0D82F7554DA9CBE4A38A0D82F7554DA9CB&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

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22 hours ago, MultiThom said:

F24 was only the original F24 MK 1 (fixed mast) and the other F24 was MK 2 (rotating mast from then on) but then Ian sold the rights to the F24 Mk2 to Corsair so some of the later hull numbers were Corsair 24 mk 2.  That happened early this century and the class made you put the nail in the coffin symbol instead of the F on the mainsail when you got a new sail....of course since I had an F24 Mk2 and I made my own sails, I still put the F on it--then I added a taller mast and it became a Thom24 :) with a Th on the sail.  All the dash and sprints and 750s and 760s are nails in the coffin boats (corsair).  I think it is pretty safe to generalize that if the length is in feet, you can call it an F boat.  If it is a meter related number, it is a nail in the coffin.

ok so there are F mk1 and mk2

and

Corsair Mk1 and mk2 ( modded deck and interior) then 760 ( new ama's modded deck and interior again), main hull is the same for all 3, plumb bow.

but I can see early Vietnam builds had a slightly different hull and thin ama's as I guess was the original F design, I have only seen it on a sprint here in Asia.

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Does any one launch and retrieve their f boat from a sheltered beach

is it possible 

thanks

wet feet

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17 minutes ago, Wet feet said:

Does any one launch and retrieve their f boat from a sheltered beach

is it possible 

thanks

wet feet

Yes have I have launched my 31-1D from the trailer when our lake was down 60 feet and all of the ramps were out of the water.  But this was in a lake with no surf to deal with.

 

 

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We regularly launch our F-82R into the ocean from relatively unimproved launch sites (e.g. no dock, no breakwater). General considerations are:

  1. The wind and sea state needs to be modest enough that the boat isn't being lifted and dropped back onto the trailer, or thrown/blown sideways
  2. The launch area has to be deep enough that you can submerge the trailer and float the boat without driving the truck into the water
  3. You need sufficient traction to pull everything back out - 4WD is helpful but I've seen people get stuck even with that. Concrete or course gravel surface is best, be careful with sand or mud.

We normally double-hand and our basic approach is to have one person standing in the water with a dry-suit holding the boat while the other person parks or retrieves the truck. 

 

 

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