IStream

Dylan's New Boat Anarchy

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On 9/23/2020 at 4:21 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Because it is a LOT safer to assume the fuel is dirty and take precautions to stop any crap getting to the engine than it is to assume all will be fine, and then have the engine shit itself due to dirty fuel.

This is my filter setup. The pair on the right filter fuel from the keel tanks to the day tank. The left pair filter fuel from the day tank to the engine where there's the final manufacturer-provided filter. Gravity feed from day tank to engine.

Yes this is ridiculous paranoid overkill. But I don't worry about dirty fuel or a failure of my fuel lift pump.

FKT

 

IMG_1470.jpeg

Crickey!  And I’m struggling to find room to mount a Racor 300, with a drop in filter, to upgrade from my smaller Racor, to make filter changes easier/less messy - little room in my otherwise very roomy 33’er.  Unless I do a long, convoluted fuel hose run...

[goddamn sideways pics...no idea why...I’m north of the Equator]

B8103AA2-DC0A-402A-8927-DEC937A0F447.jpeg

41E1E736-9485-46F1-AA14-59EFAF59A163.jpeg

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I'd kill for that kind of engine access. Mine lives below the floorboards, so getting to anything below the valve cover involves laying on my belly and I often find that my arms are too short.

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8 minutes ago, IStream said:

I'd kill for that kind of engine access. Mine lives below the floorboards, so getting to anything below the valve cover involves laying on my belly and I often find that my arms are too short.

Yeag, the boat has really good engine access - but I’ve discovered that mounting a larger filter will be a really big PITA...

186C815E-148F-487E-9A3A-1FA2F11822E7.jpeg

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FWIW, I've got some pretty long fuel feed and return lines on my boat in order to put the filters in a convenient location and it's not a big deal. There's not a lot of pressure and fuel lines seem to last forever with diesel. 

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25 minutes ago, IStream said:

FWIW, I've got some pretty long fuel feed and return lines on my boat in order to put the filters in a convenient location and it's not a big deal. There's not a lot of pressure and fuel lines seem to last forever with diesel. 

Good to know - thanks for the info...just have to get a bit creative...

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33 miles down a choppy north sea from blyth to hartlepool

Easterly wind makes the sea lumpy

Engine running file but slowly filling the bilges

40 strokes of the pump every 20 min of running time

 

Leak is not from the pump, nor the exhaust

 

 

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20 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

33 miles down a choppy north sea from blyth to hartlepool

Easterly wind makes the sea lumpy

Engine running file but slowly filling the bilges

40 strokes of the pump every 20 min of running time

 

Leak is not from the pump, nor the exhaust

 

 

packing gland?

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7 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

packing gland?

Not that either

Not from the engine end

 

Just a gentle drip

Not several buckets full an hour

I closed all the through hulls

Not the cooling intake of course

 

No leakage when under sail or outboard

Going to spend so time on it Saturday while it rains all day

D

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You check the seawater pump and associated hoses/clamps? 

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Oh, and congratulations on the first leg of the delivery!

That noisy auto-pilot doesn't sound healthy. Is it something that takes a bit of grease?

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What about the connection of the exhaust hose to exhaust outlet fitting in the transom? Those can be hard to see in many boats. 

Great to see the Whale sailing! Can you fly a mizzen staysail on that rig? Off the wind, it could add some sail area and is easy to fly. 

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The ingress is much worse at high revs

 

I shalll check every hose I can get to

 

It would be nice to use the big engine more

 

D

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Would be interesting to see if you get the same ingress with the engine at operating RPM but out of gear.

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3 minutes ago, IStream said:

Would be interesting to see if you get the same ingress with the engine at operating RPM but out of gear.

I shall try that too

 

D

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Is it possible to add some water based dye to the water intake for the engine?

That might show where the leak is.

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If the water ingress only happens when the engine is running it has to be one of three things

Cooling intake

Wet exhaust

Stuffing box.

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40 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

If the water ingress only happens when the engine is running it has to be one of three things

Cooling intake

Wet exhaust

Stuffing box.

Four thing:

Engine running causes high boat speed which causes sea water level to rise (bow wave? stern wave?) above some opening in the hull.

Steve

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29 minutes ago, Panope said:

Four thing:

Engine running causes high boat speed which causes sea water level to rise (bow wave? stern wave?) above some opening in the hull.

Steve

Another possibility - vented loop that's faulty/open and allowing water to escape.

I have a valve on mine opening onto the weather deck so I an see the impeller is working, as does one of my friends. But prior he did have a leak out of the vented loop that was dripping right on to his oil pressure sender - which promptly shorted out, setting off the low oil alarm.

After that he did the same as me - fitted a mechanical oil gauge in addition to the electric one. Those Murphy gauges are beautiful things.

FKT

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

If the water ingress only happens when the engine is running it has to be one of three things

Cooling intake

Wet exhaust

Stuffing box.

Or a crack in a waterlock muffler.

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

If the water ingress only happens when the engine is running it has to be one of three things

Cooling intake

Wet exhaust

Stuffing box.

We had a cracked cockpit drain hose once.  Only time water was apparently coming in was when we were underway by motor - crossing from just one side of False Creek to the other!  Tons of water suddenly in the bilge - flow would stop when we took boat out of gear and it slowed down. Mysterious...finally realized it was the wave created by the boat’s motion forcing water up the hose (which exits the boat right at the waterline), which leaked heavily into the boat...

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9 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Or a crack in a waterlock muffler.

This was my next thought. Some freeze damage somewhere that doesn't show until a little pressure allows the leak. This shouldn't be too hard to find, Dylan. Don't go down the forum rabbit hole. 

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Righto

 

Ran the engine at 1300 revs under load for 20 minutes

 

Not a drop came in anywhere

 

All engine pipes dry

 

So I looked at the cockpit drains

 

There is a weird box on each side

 

Obvious thing to do is to to close the valves

They are resisting

Here is a film of the set up

Yesterday was rough and there was some backing up under power

Good that it is not almost certainly not an engine leak

 

 

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Leaking only underway motoring and not run up at the dock would point me to a waterline fitting or drive line.  The stern probably squats some underway so maybe a aft thru hull, rudder stuffing box or stern tube gland.   If possible I would repeat your dockside experiment in gear ahead and see if the leak presents itself.

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My father had a somewhat similar problem in one of the old "Cherubini" Hunter 30s. Water would collect when the boat was under weigh in a space in the bow above the waterline . I don't remember that he ever solved the mystery. 

Given the reputation of those boats for poor construction,  theories based on poor glass work abound.

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Do you get a leak when you run the outboard @ WOT ?

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I have 40 miles to do tomorrow

I will put the pilot on heading sse

Put the engine on at 2000 revs

Shove my head down the myriad of pipe strewn orrifices

And inspect the pipework while the whale passes through the bouncy water

Thanks for your advice

I will report   back from scarborough

D

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

Do you get a leak when you run the outboard @ WOT ?

 

6 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

No

Not a drop which was what made me suspect the diesel

I wonder if the prop pressure is promoting some sort of siphon

D

 

Quote

 

 

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On 9/30/2020 at 10:17 AM, SloopJonB said:

No-one, absolutely no-one can do arch or snotty condescension like a Brit with a good accent. ;)

 

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Cleese is an immortal but I was actually referring to a much more subtle practice of the British U.C.'s

I read a perfect example of it once - possibly here. The writer had been sitting on his slightly shopworn sailboat in a glitzy Med. marina when such a woman from a neighbouring ultra immaculate, flawlessly varnished, crewed boat stopped and said "It must be so relaxing to not have to care about the appearance of your boat".

Or another - a working class woman getting a ride in a Royce from another such woman. the subject came up of the UC's little daughter speaking French she had learned from her French nanny. Working class said "I wish I had the opportunity to learn French" to which UC said "Oh, do you think you would have used it"?

It's taken literally centuries of inbreeding to develop that sort of skill. :D

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I prefer to think of myself as sufficiently stupid that I don't have to try to fool any one into thinking I'm smart. It's quite liberating, actually. ;)

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Not sure about using it underway, someone else will comment.
And I'm sure you already know this but if you've not already, I'd recommend picking up a Carbon Monoxide detector from Screwfix or Toolstation, they're pretty cheap & in the small space of a boat could save your life. Especially if your not too sure on how good the install is.

There was a case a few years ago about some chap who'd installed a diesel heater on his boat, but got it wrong & killed his family, all for the sake of a £10 detector.

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

First night with Taylor heater

Cranking it out

I am assuming I can use it while underway

d

Keeping your cuppa warm on the stove was a nice touch!  Though I doubt you could do that underway without getting tea all over the cushions.

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8 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

Keeping your cuppa warm on the stove was a nice touch!  Though I doubt you could do that underway without getting tea all over the cushions.

I drink a lot of tea

Generally too slowly

generally beaten by entropy

So far I

Like the thing

Super dry heat, no noise, no battery drain

The winter bird watching is going to be toasty

The jacket dries on the hook by the sliding door

d

 

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On 10/2/2020 at 11:16 AM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:
On 10/2/2020 at 10:50 AM, IStream said:

FWIW, I've got some pretty long fuel feed and return lines on my boat in order to put the filters in a convenient location and it's not a big deal. There's not a lot of pressure and fuel lines seem to last forever with diesel. 

Good to know - thanks for the info...just have to get a bit creative...

Bingo! A longer run is not problem, the number of joints is the problem.

However, you -do- need to keep the level relative to the fuel tank in mind.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, IStream said:

^1000 times this.

This x 10E8.

I have a combined flammable gas (LPG) and carbon monoxide sniffer. Cost $300 odd IIRC. Worth it.

It's hard-wired into the system, you cannot turn it off other than physically pulling its fuse.

WRT the Taylor, glad to hear you like it. I have a Dickinson diesel heater but have yet to finish its installation as I spend winter somewhere warmer as a rule.

FKT

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5 hours ago, dylan winter said:

First night with Taylor heater

Cranking it out

I am assuming I can use it while underway

d

Way better than a candle and a flower pot! :-)

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Ditto on the CO monitor.  We have a dickenson Adriatic diesel and a little cod solid fuel.  Neither have been on for a while.... Loved them both in the northern weather.  Highly recommend a barometric dampner for the stack on the diesel heater. They are worth their weight in gold if you are running the stove in any weather.  FYI most of these heaters suffered from non sulfer diesel.  Don't be surprised if you have to clean the stove more than recommended.  You can spend a bit of time dialing in the carburator and dampner to make life a bit easier but the burner cleaning is still way more than before.  Our friends had a dickenson pacific and for 30 some years cleaned it once a year, it ran about 8-9 months straight.  The last several years they fell onto the big weekly or monthly regime for cleaning.  If they get coked up it's easy for them to back draft flame out etc.  This means either a cabin full of smoke or a deck full of soot, neither a good time.  We found a small shop vac and paper towels made it a quick process for cleaning regularly.  If clean and the stack and tophat are good no reason not to run underway.

Their are thermocouple solenoids for the fuel supply out their as additional safeties as well.

 

We found very good cleaning maintenance and annual recal on the carburator and dampner to make it mostly problem free.

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2 hours ago, chester said:

Way better than a candle and a flower pot! :-)

The flower pot thing has been proven to not work.

Plus, it's dangerous - they can explode without warning, sending ceramic shrapnel flying.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

The flower pot thing has been proven to not work.

Plus, it's dangerous - they can explode without warning, sending ceramic shrapnel flying.

Do you have a cite for that.

Not being difficult... just curious about the possibility or mechanism involved

 

Dylan

 

ps only form of boat heat on the trailer sailer for five winters      still alive and unharmed by shrapnel

 

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On 10/2/2020 at 2:55 PM, IStream said:

Every motorsailor I've been on is great when there's plenty of wind from aft of the beam

FIFY

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2 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Do you have a cite for that.

Not being difficult... just curious about the possibility or mechanism involved

 

Dylan

 

ps only form of boat heat on the trailer sailer for five winters      still alive and unharmed by shrapnel

 

I don't have a cite, and it may be just a rubbish theory, but *if* there is any water in the flower pot shell and *if* the temperature of the pot goes over 100C, there is a risk of a steam explosion. So I can see that it could happen in the right (wrong) set of conditions.

Ever lit a fire on near shore sandstone rocks that look quite dry and had some pop/blast loose? I have.

Personally I'd be far more concerned about partial combustion producing carbon monoxide.

FKT

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6 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Ditto on the CO monitor.  We have a dickenson Adriatic diesel and a little cod solid fuel.  Neither have been on for a while.... Loved them both in the northern weather.  Highly recommend a barometric dampner for the stack on the diesel heater. They are worth their weight in gold if you are running the stove in any weather.  FYI most of these heaters suffered from non sulfer diesel.  Don't be surprised if you have to clean the stove more than recommended.  You can spend a bit of time dialing in the carburator and dampner to make life a bit easier but the burner cleaning is still way more than before.  Our friends had a dickenson pacific and for 30 some years cleaned it once a year, it ran about 8-9 months straight.  The last several years they fell onto the big weekly or monthly regime for cleaning.  If they get coked up it's easy for them to back draft flame out etc.  This means either a cabin full of smoke or a deck full of soot, neither a good time.  We found a small shop vac and paper towels made it a quick process for cleaning regularly.  If clean and the stack and tophat are good no reason not to run underway.

Their are thermocouple solenoids for the fuel supply out their as additional safeties as well.

 

We found very good cleaning maintenance and annual recal on the carburator and dampner to make it mostly problem free.

You have distilled  the argument for switching to kerosene on a Dickinson...  (my Dickinson Bristol needed the frequent cleanings you mention but with kerosene, even 24/7 operation for 4 months (winter liveaboard) required only one cleaning at the beginning of the heating season).

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13 hours ago, dylan winter said:

First night with Taylor heater

Cranking it out

I am assuming I can use it while underway

d

There is high cosiness potential there, Dylan.

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8 hours ago, dylan winter said:
10 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

The flower pot thing has been proven to not work.

Plus, it's dangerous - they can explode without warning, sending ceramic shrapnel flying.

Do you have a cite for that.

Not being difficult... just curious about the possibility or mechanism involved

 

Dylan

 

ps only form of boat heat on the trailer sailer for five winters      still alive and unharmed by shrapnel

The "flower pot trick" does work to heat the cabin but it also may produce enough CO to kill you.

Discussed in these august forums in the past. And yes, there have been documented fatalities.

What you're doing by putting a flower pot over any kind of flame is creating a combustion chamber, one that is guaranteed to produce very inefficient combustion.

FB- Doug

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17 hours ago, dylan winter said:

I drink a lot of tea

Generally too slowly

generally beaten by entropy

So far I

Like the thing

Super dry heat, no noise, no battery drain

The winter bird watching is going to be toasty

The jacket dries on the hook by the sliding door

d

 

Nobody deserves that heat more than you, Dylan. 

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10 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Do you have a cite for that.

Not being difficult... just curious about the possibility or mechanism involved

Dylan

ps only form of boat heat on the trailer sailer for five winters      still alive and unharmed by shrapnel

I believe it was an article about testing various forms of it in Practical Boat Owner - within the last year or so.

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I work on boat, caravan and house gas systems both natural gas and LPG.  I think it's worth running some ducting to provide fresh air from the outside to feed the heater, to give you an idea of how much fresh air for combustion is required to prevent CO for natural gas it's 9 parts air to 1 part gas.  Dunno about oily fuels, not my thing. 

I wouldn't run the heater without a CO and fire alarms.  PM me if you want the rest of your lpg system checked out.  I live in Ipswich..  

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5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

The "flower pot trick" does work to heat the cabin but it also may produce enough CO to kill you.

Discussed in these august forums in the past. And yes, there have been documented fatalities.

What you're doing by putting a flower pot over any kind of flame is creating a combustion chamber, one that is guaranteed to produce very inefficient combustion.

FB- Doug

I’d guess (only a guess!) that the flower pot method would be safer over top a propane burner, since propane combustion produces (much?) less hydrocarbons.  I think that’s how I’ve commonly seen/heard of it being done, over a propane/butane burner.

(Sorry if I’ve got this wrong - I haven’t read the entire thread, but saw that Dylan has a Taylor’s heater (?), paraffin/kerosene, correct?  So assumed that’s what he wanted to put a flower pot on, not propane/butane.)

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32 minutes ago, Whinging Pom said:

I work on boat, caravan and house gas systems both natural gas and LPG.  I think it's worth running some ducting to provide fresh air from the outside to feed the heater, to give you an idea of how much fresh air for combustion is required to prevent CO for natural gas it's 9 parts air to 1 part gas.  Dunno about oily fuels, not my thing. 

I wouldn't run the heater without a CO and fire alarms.  PM me if you want the rest of your lpg system checked out.  I live in Ipswich..  

This is very true with gas, it also makes a shit load of condensation. It's not so much with solid fuel or diesel. Definitely need good air flow but propane is the only one where a dedicated ducted supply is reccomended.

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4 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I’d guess (only a guess!) that the flower pot method would be safer over top a propane burner, since propane combustion produces (much?) less hydrocarbons.  I think that’s how I’ve commonly seen/heard of it being done, over a propane/butane burner.

(Sorry if I’ve got this wrong - I haven’t read the entire thread, but saw that Dylan has a Taylor’s heater (?), paraffin/kerosene, correct?  So assumed that’s what he wanted to put a flower pot on, not propane/butane.)

You're probably right, but using propane without an exhaust IMHO ends up making the cabin colder, because it releases a LOT of water vapor and the combustion draws in outside cold air, the combination end up making the cabin feel dank and clammy and chilly, even with the fire still going.

I had a boat with a small ("tiny" would probably be accurate) soapstone fireplace, the exhaust vent was like a 3/4" tube to a very cute little "Charlie Noble" stack on the cabin top. Stupid thing was great for catching the jib sheet. But with two or three charcoal briquettes in there, which is all it would hold any way, it dried out the cabin and made it quite snug. The thing would warm up a cup of coffee set on top of it but not much else. It was the drying effect that helped most IMHO. I kept thinking about adding a fresh air feed to it but never did. I still think that would have been a worthwhile improvement. We also used it to burn the paper/cardboard trash and save space that way.

FB- Doug

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North sea today

 

Hartlepool to scarborough

 

38 miles

 

Strong southerly on the nose for 5 hours

 

Then beam reach

 

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I'm glad that you and the Whale have started to bond. She looks a proper little ship, shouldering her way though the chop.

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4 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

I'm glad that you and the Whale have started to bond. She looks a proper little ship, shouldering her way though the chop.

The bows shed the chop and feel secure

Bloody lumpy today

Boat sails pretty well

I also found the source of the leak

 

 

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Nice to see her in her element. Did you try to sail upwind ?

My dad owns one of those below that he bought a decade ago to potter around with his grandchildren (he wanted a deep cockpit) and despite the shallow long keel and the "whale shape", we've learnt to sail her (initial plan was motoring + downwind sailing). Sure she can't win races but as long as you don't pinch, don't flatten the sails too much and accept to tack 100º side to side  she moves along at about 4 knots. Perfectly fast enough to go buy an ice-cream on the other side of the estuary....

5dd1f69539819f3668de7bf3.jpg

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Nothing like a 'spare' hole in the hull to make things exciting. What could have drained out there?  Also - either get your window rubber back in place, or trim of the loos bits & seal with black caulking before they start to leak also

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10 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

It was the drain for the gas bottle holder

I removed the gas system

So it was a own goal

d

Congrats on finding it.

If it makes you feel any better, I lost a battery charger after I flooded my propane locker while cleaning it out. They're supposed to be watertight, right? Turns out the PO had screwed a couple of things into the bottom of the locker at one point and never properly sealed the holes afterwards. Never assume...

However, I consider myself lucky that I found the leak the way I did rather than via explosion. 

Because of the size of your leak, it seems you were never in danger of sinking the boat and it's very good to know that it wasn't a structural defect, a failing thru hull, a bad shaft gland, a detaching keel, or the like. I consider you lucky too.

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44 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

It was the drain for the gas bottle holder

I removed the gas system

So it was a own goal

d

Oh well shit happens - you found it, you can fix it, problem solved. Nice that you don't have to chase and re-chase all the coolant runs for intermittent leaks.

The whale looks very nice moving along. I hope she gives you many, many happy sea days.

FKT

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Congratulations on getting such a cool little ship Dylan. 

We are looking forwards to seeing what you do with her!

Cheers

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On 9/23/2020 at 6:21 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Because it is a LOT safer to assume the fuel is dirty and take precautions to stop any crap getting to the engine than it is to assume all will be fine, and then have the engine shit itself due to dirty fuel.

This is my filter setup. The pair on the right filter fuel from the keel tanks to the day tank. The left pair filter fuel from the day tank to the engine where there's the final manufacturer-provided filter. Gravity feed from day tank to engine.

Yes this is ridiculous paranoid overkill. But I don't worry about dirty fuel or a failure of my fuel lift pump.

FKT

 

IMG_1470.jpeg

Are fleetgaurd the predominant brand down there?  Parker racor seem to have gobbled up most markets. Really like them, have a large duplex on our boat but the cost initial and replacement is very high.  Also so far I haven't seen non OEM elements offered anywhere.

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As you may know, Fleetguard is the house brand of Cummins, so they can be found anywhere in the world outside of marine stores. They're excellent filters. Donaldson also makes a very high quality filter.

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3 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Are fleetgaurd the predominant brand down there?  Parker racor seem to have gobbled up most markets. Really like them, have a large duplex on our boat but the cost initial and replacement is very high.  Also so far I haven't seen non OEM elements offered anywhere.

I just changed out some of those CAV (3 different builders) style filters, they are quite fiddly to change filters on. Easy to have a tiny air/fuel leak. Racor's are waay easier. But you can get filter cans for those old units from many sources, lots of farm equipment use them

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You need to be a zen master to change the O-rings in a CAV filter.  The little bastards just won't stay put. I've always junked them and fitted Racor.

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31 minutes ago, Whinging Pom said:

You need to be a zen master to change the O-rings in a CAV filter.  The little bastards just won't stay put. I've always junked them and fitted Racor.

Smear it in vaseline and they'll stay in place, once everythings in place then rotate the the filter & base back and forth a few times to settle it onto the seal, tighten up, job done easy.

Still a ballache doing it in the cockpit locker with the boat jumping around.

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Scarborough to the humber

 

The wind swung to the west

 

Flat water, beam reach, lots of tide  7.8 knots sog

 

 

Now I  grimsby fish dock

 

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Lost video at 4:25 but it looked like a great trip. 

Might want to tighten that jib halyard tension a hair, it seems like the sail is straining at the feed slot in the foil.

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My goodness! That mainsail has a few patches. Best get working on a sponsorship deal from your friends at Jeckells?

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Sails aren't too bad:  Jib needs halyard tension

                                     Main needs halyard tension AND a boom vang.   That little ss plate on the underside of the boom about a meter aft of gooseneck? that's got a keyhole slot in it to attach vang tackle. Hopefully you've got the tackle & the other part of that boom fitting, that's really old school stuff. Lots of dinghy's used that setup. Tension vang until upper batten stays parallel to boom as mainsheet gets eased out.

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Glad you got the leak sorted, definitely sounded like what it was.  

Istream, yes aware of the off brands have used alot, we buy filters by the pallet at work, depending on the purchasing agent who knows from where.  Have seen a few boats set up like FKT, since racors are so prominent was wondering the reason thats all.  I think cat 35 series win the award of worse OEM filter arrangements.  Cummins are a close secound.

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On 10/6/2020 at 9:56 AM, SASSAFRASS said:

Glad you got the leak sorted, definitely sounded like what it was.  

Istream, yes aware of the off brands have used alot, we buy filters by the pallet at work, depending on the purchasing agent who knows from where.  Have seen a few boats set up like FKT, since racors are so prominent was wondering the reason thats all.  I think cat 35 series win the award of worse OEM filter arrangements.  Cummins are a close secound.

Sorry, been off sailing.

The reason is simple - I got those filter pairs for free :)

If they give me any shit I'll happily replace them with others that don't. The imperative was to get the boat built with what I had and get it out of the shed. Now that milestone is well & truly passed I'll piss away endless money in upgrades etc as the whim takes me. Just been sewing up more rope bags etc and that's tidied up more of the lines that were annoying me. Cover for the anchor winch is next - it'll also cover the chain hole in the foredeck to stop rainwater going down there. Doesn't seem to be happening to any noticeable extent but it can.

FKT

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7 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Sorry, been off sailing.

The reason is simple - I got those filter pairs for free :)

If they give me any shit I'll happily replace them with others that don't. The imperative was to get the boat built with what I had and get it out of the shed. Now that milestone is well & truly passed I'll piss away endless money in upgrades etc as the whim takes me. Just been sewing up more rope bags etc and that's tidied up more of the lines that were annoying me. Cover for the anchor winch is next - it'll also cover the chain hole in the foredeck to stop rainwater going down there. Doesn't seem to be happening to any noticeable extent but it can.

FKT

When you're down to solving theoretical problems, you've truly achieved well-foundedness.

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7 hours ago, IStream said:

When you're down to solving theoretical problems, you've truly achieved well-foundedness.

Over fettling can be a barrier to sailing time.

 

The boat is owing  grimsby fish dock

 

£78 for a week with free lekkie

Back home now doing honeydews while waiting for the current weather system to blow through

Also ordering an echo sounder as entering the wash without one is a bit stupid

In the wash charts are merely historical documents

 

D

 

 

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41 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

In the wash charts are merely historical documents 

At least if you lose them overboard you don't miss them for navigation purposes.

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By the way @dylan winter
 I would be curious to know how you manage to get the Fisher go to weather. That will either confirm or falsify my theory that (ex)Dinghy sailors manage to sail to weather anything featuring flatish sails and some form of fin underneath.

My unscientific guesstimate would be 105º side to side at 4.5 knots.

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

Over fettling can be a barrier to sailing time.

Weather is going to shit again so there's plenty of shed time between sailing. Back on the diesel heater flue now. I sewed up another pocketed bag from some leftover Top Gun cloth and that's gotten the small lines, snubbers and odd things neatly stowed behind the foremast now. Probably modify the gallows bag setup and add another couple pockets on the aft side. Lot of lines with a junk rig.

Always things ticking over on how to improve how I do things or stow things. We had a lovely quiet sail, didn't go far but don't really need to around here. No dolphins this time though and only 1 seal.

Agree about the depth sounder. I cut across a shoal I usually don't have a problem with, tide was dead low, saw the sounder show 0.4m under the keel so put the wheel over *hard* before we came to a stop. GF was on the bow with the boathook getting ready to pick up the mooring pennant (another 500m in front), I got the WTF look. My excuse is the weather over winter must have moved some of the sand a bit.

FKT

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3 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Over fettling can be a barrier to sailing time.

 

The boat is owing  grimsby fish dock

 

£78 for a week with free lekkie

Back home now doing honeydews while waiting for the current weather system to blow through

Also ordering an echo sounder as entering the wash without one is a bit stupid

In the wash charts are merely historical documents

 

D

 

 

If you don’t have a cored hull you can probably get away with an in hull transducer..

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17 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Sorry, been off sailing.

The reason is simple - I got those filter pairs for free :)

If they give me any shit I'll happily replace them with others that don't. The imperative was to get the boat built with what I had and get it out of the shed. Now that milestone is well & truly passed I'll piss away endless money in upgrades etc as the whim takes me. Just been sewing up more rope bags etc and that's tidied up more of the lines that were annoying me. Cover for the anchor winch is next - it'll also cover the chain hole in the foredeck to stop rainwater going down there. Doesn't seem to be happening to any noticeable extent but it can.

FKT

Free is good and usually makes sense.  I've been caught a couple times spending a bit to make free parts work but that's a different story.  I just serviced a Cummins genset for a friend, omg inverted upside down hell in a sterile white space.  Thankfully the only mess was the blood spots to clean up from cutting myself on all the sharp bits.

Starting some of the refit fun on our boat now, powder coated aluminum bulwark is due, guys in Fremont did a awsome job, almost 8 years and a few miles before having to touch it.

 

The balance of sailing and working is a tough one, sailing time tends to soften the acceptance of things looking like crap, then when you do dig in you pays your bills.

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On 10/5/2020 at 11:23 PM, Jim in Halifax said:

My goodness! That mainsail has a few patches. Best get working on a sponsorship deal from your friends at Jeckells?

I think they might be burns from the chimney

I think my days of sponsorship are over

D

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10 hours ago, Steve_sos said:

Shouldn't you have been on the other side of that Cardinal bouy ?  :D

Interesting assumption on your part there...

FKT

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3 hours ago, dylan winter said:

I think they might be burns from the chimney

I think my days of sponsorship are over

D

Ah. That would make sense. Do you have a proper Charlie Nobel? Pity some sail loft won't sponsor you. Maybe a write-in campaign of KTL support from your legion of MOBs...

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14 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

Ah. That would make sense. Do you have a proper Charlie Nobel? Pity some sail loft won't sponsor you. Maybe a write-in campaign of KTL support from your legion of MOBs...

it is a taylor

I am hoping to spend next autumn in the sound between islay and Jura

200,000 barnacle geese

worth pointing a camera at aganst a hebriden sunset as they wheel and turn arranging themselves in the air in preparation for landing 1000 birds on an area about the same as a football pitch

I will need whisky and warmth to see me through the long nights

 

 

D

D

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8 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

it is a taylor

Taylor is/was a reputable English firm, kind of like Dickenson on this side of the pond. I am sure they make a decent Charlie Nobel to fit your flue pipe and if sparks are flying, its time to clean the flue in any case. (If Charlie Nobel is not a term you use in Blighty, its one of those "H" shaped tops for the chimney). Learn the ins and outs of that Taylor and I'm sure it will keep you cosy in the frigid waters of Scotland.

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42 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

Taylor is/was a reputable English firm, kind of like Dickenson on this side of the pond. I am sure they make a decent Charlie Nobel to fit your flue pipe and if sparks are flying, its time to clean the flue in any case. (If Charlie Nobel is not a term you use in Blighty, its one of those "H" shaped tops for the chimney). Learn the ins and outs of that Taylor and I'm sure it will keep you cosy in the frigid waters of Scotland.

yes it has an H shaped chimney

fek

I  am talking about chimneys on a boat

age is a cruel thing

I used to race hornets with sliding seats

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Warm is warm man...

There is a bit of good info out there for dialing the stove in.  Basics are flame should be just past blue no spot.  If dialed in your stack heat should be pretty low on a diesel stove.  I think you can download most of dickenson stuff, they have good info on setting up the stove, mostly the same.

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3 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Interesting assumption on your part there...

FKT

He was heading south wasn't he?

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