IStream

Dylan's New Boat Anarchy

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Y'all have me jealous of the warmth....

Winter IS coming.....

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I like the idea of a evenings in the cabin while moored up an East anglia creek  with old tec diesel heater and a good mobile broadband tablet with Spotify music, every radio station in the world, 50 books on kindle and old reruns of the Adams family and Seinfeld on you tube, sailing anarchy politics to marvel at

And overwintering east anglia birds to watch during the day while eating an egg banjo for brekki

d

 

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And now you can do all that sat in the telephone box. Warm and dry with fantastic visibility.

The father of a good friend of mine owned many racing boats that we sailed as kids. As he got older he had a few large cruising yachts. His last boat was a little Fisher like yours. He loved it, had some great sailing around the East coast. Sadly the boats are gone now.

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3 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

And now you can do all that sat in the telephone box. Warm and dry with fantastic visibility.

The father of a good friend of mine owned many racing boats that we sailed as kids. As he got older he had a few large cruising yachts. His last boat was a little Fisher like yours. He loved it, had some great sailing around the East coast. Sadly the boats are gone now.

On this last trip from Newcastle to the humber the easterly was blowing and the north sea was choppy and she rolled much worse than the centaur

Putting the engine on got me some stability

On the last day the wind was beam to fetch from the west

So the water was flat

The boat sailed better than i coul have hoped

Just centering the tiller kept her sailing at a dead consistentangle to the wind

I spent about half my time in the wheelhouse and half the time in the cockpit    which is a weird place given the terrible visibility other than viewed through the windows of the wheelhouse

I was worried that being in the wheelhouse would make me feel seasick

All I can say is so far so good

Sitting on the saloon roof is a nice place to sit

As is on the wheelhouse roof

I miss the feel of the water over the rudder as felt through the tiller

I am going to buy a decent extending tiller extension

Once I can disconnect the steering wheel I can sit on the edge of the cockpit and get a decent view and feel from there.

However, most of the time I will be towing the sailing dinghy

 

D

 

 

 

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Seems a shame to afflict her with the drag of towing a dinghy. Is there no way to store the dinghy on deck? 

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4 hours ago, dylan winter said:

this starts green

 

then goes yellow and roars a bit - the flame is down around the curly bits

 

https://www.sparesmarine.co.uk/webshop/heaters/079d-diesel-cabin-heater/main-heater/

Saw there are plenty of manuals online, the Taylor is a drip feed and simpler than the Canadian ones.  No carburator, burner chamber is still more or less the same idea.  Should make for some toasty evenings contemplating all there is 

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

On this last trip from Newcastle to the humber the easterly was blowing and the north sea was choppy and she rolled much worse than the centaur

Putting the engine on got me some stability

On the last day the wind was beam to fetch from the west

So the water was flat

The boat sailed better than i coul have hoped

Just centering the tiller kept her sailing at a dead consistentangle to the wind

I spent about half my time in the wheelhouse and half the time in the cockpit    which is a weird place given the terrible visibility other than viewed through the windows of the wheelhouse

I was worried that being in the wheelhouse would make me feel seasick

All I can say is so far so good

Sitting on the saloon roof is a nice place to sit

As is on the wheelhouse roof

I miss the feel of the water over the rudder as felt through the tiller

I am going to buy a decent extending tiller extension

Once I can disconnect the steering wheel I can sit on the edge of the cockpit and get a decent view and feel from there.

However, most of the time I will be towing the sailing dinghy

 

D

 

 

 

I enjoy Sailing and Cruising in Scotland, an online group. I love this shot I took off the group, -or should I say, I love not being there at the moment the shot was taken. I love Scotland having visited a couple of times, and it does rain a lot. But rain is easy to take if you have the right gear, like a nearby B&B or a warm pub(or a warm phone box). 

1593969642_SailinginScotland..thumb.jpg.6fb7f5477b1b88cbba3043fe46e3b48b.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

Seems a shame to afflict her with the drag of towing a dinghy. Is there no way to store the dinghy on deck? 

Not really

I have been towing a dinghy for the past few seasons

Got used to it and the clinker dinghy is a delight to row and sail

d

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Fair enough. It just seems that with a motorsailor's sail SA/D and a short waterline, you'd get significantly better sailing performance by pulling the dinghy up on deck or on davits.

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19 hours ago, dylan winter said:

while eating an egg banjo for brekki

d

 

I’ve heard of a “full English” - but egg banjo, Dylan?  Wots that?

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2 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I’ve heard of a “full English” - but egg banjo, Dylan?  Wots that?

Sort of a bastardized Egg McMuffin-  A runny egg between two thick slices of heavily buttered bread.

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20 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Yes. Very good!

Flame should have bright, slightly-darker-than-sky-blue crown all the way across the flame. It should be nice and symmetrical too.

I calibrated industrial combustion controls as one of my "big" jobs. At one point I could tell the temp, free O, CO, and SO2 (this depends on fuel, propane obviously does not have sulpher in it), output of a stack by looking in the view port.

FB- Doug

A skill that you’ve had lying around and thought you would never use, until you accept an invite for some cold-weather cruising with Dylan.

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I’ve heard of a “full English” - but egg banjo, Dylan?  Wots that?

needless to say...

there is a video

and the derivation of the weird name for a sandwhich

the tank corps are particularly fond of them

you can cook them on a hot muffler

 

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36 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

needless to say...

there is a video

and the derivation of the weird name for a sandwhich

the tank corps are particularly fond of them

you can cook them on a hot muffler

 

Fantastique! :-) [was heard shouted out from the kitchens of the approving French gourmands across the Channel] (“We don’t bloody care, now, do we!” came the hearty British reply.)

Of course —there is a (great) video!  Thanks for clarifying, Dylan.  (After I saw Ajax above suggesting that the banjo was a bastardized version of the McDonald’s egg thing [for what else can that soggy, rubbery fast food item really be called?], and then watched your vid, I then realized which one was the original chicken, and which one was the bastardized New World offspring :-) )

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@dylan winter Great. Now I have to figure out where I can buy Piccalilly sauce in the US.

Can you believe I've finished my 2nd jar of Vegemite? Great stuff on an egg banjo with cheddar. Gotta have the cheddar though.

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Branston pickle and cheddar cheese sandwich. 

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Sriracha....

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

@dylan winter Great. Now I have to figure out where I can buy Piccalilly sauce in the US.

Can you believe I've finished my 2nd jar of Vegemite? Great stuff on an egg banjo with cheddar. Gotta have the cheddar though.

In that case you'll probably like Piccalilly - which is a relish by the way.

Anyone else should steer clear of it. If you need an alternative, I'd recommend Branston pickle.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

@dylan winter Great. Now I have to figure out where I can buy Piccalilly sauce in the US.

Can you believe I've finished my 2nd jar of Vegemite? Great stuff on an egg banjo with cheddar. Gotta have the cheddar though.

Piccadilly, or generically,  pickles in mustard sauce, was a staple in our house when I was growing up. It has become hard to find.  Other names are mustard pickle and chow-chow. Not too hard to make your own, i should think, but I've never tried.

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2 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Piccadilly, or generically,  pickles in mustard sauce, was a staple in our house when I was growing up. It has become hard to find.  Other names are mustard pickle and chow-chow. Not too hard to make your own, i should think, but I've never tried.

I was eating piccalilli

Recipes all over the web

Good to make as gifts for adults at Christmas

In our house we now have a rule that all gifts must be edible or drinkable

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

In our house we now have a rule that all gifts must be edible or drinkable

Wow - you really are old. ;)

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2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Wow - you really are old. ;)

We have enough stuff

With the whale I also acquired another man's sailing heritage

D

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7 hours ago, Ajax said:

@dylan winter Great. Now I have to figure out where I can buy Piccalilly sauce in the US.

Can you believe I've finished my 2nd jar of Vegemite? Great stuff on an egg banjo with cheddar. Gotta have the cheddar though.

Every third jar comes with a free Australian Visa...

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

We have enough stuff

With the whale I also acquired another man's sailing heritage

D

Books are always welcome here. We read a lot and then pass on the excess to others. The next cull is overdue...

FKT

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A7575567-C12B-448B-929E-F9373A0AB8D6.thumb.jpeg.3daf31b8d94f099b332e607e4ab8dfdd.jpegFound this in the local grocery - I’m in Massachusetts. 

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10 hours ago, dylan winter said:

needless to say...

there is a video

and the derivation of the weird name for a sandwhich

the tank corps are particularly fond of them

you can cook them on a hot muffler

 

Did you design/build the portable galley?

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My grandmother used to make something like those Piccadilly’s with home canned pickles, I think a yellow mustard, and a grinder 

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Here's a poor man's recipe for picalilli.  Three teaspoons of green hot dog pickle, one teaspoon of yellow mustard, 1/2 teaspoon of vinegar and one teaspoon of water.  It's not quite the same but you will get the idea.  Branston is better.

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4 hours ago, chester said:

Did you design/build the portable galley?

I did

It is currently on the fisher now that I have removed the gas oven

The good thing is that when cooking fish, bacon or sausages i can move it out to the cock pit

I will spare you the how to video

Which does exist on my website somewhere

 

D

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8 hours ago, dylan winter said:

I did

It is currently on the fisher now that I have removed the gas oven

The good thing is that when cooking fish, bacon or sausages i can move it out to the cock pit

I will spare you the how to video

Which does exist on my website somewhere

 

D

What was the reason to remove the oven? Any other modifications you have planned? 

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27 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

What was the reason to remove the oven? Any other modifications you have planned? 

50 year old amateur maintained gas system

 

long perished pipe from stern locker to galley

I much prefer a meths system

Cheaper to fuel and safer and works even when the temperatures are below freezing

The gas cooker is going to be fitted to an old long keel fishing boat a bloke in blyth is rebuilding

Apart from cleaning everything, replacing the light bulbs and removing the radar i do not intend doing anything too drastic

 

D

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I hope you meant "replacing the radar". They're not that expensive and are extremely useful when the fog rolls in suddenly and ships are about, which is not unknown in the areas you sail.

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58 minutes ago, IStream said:

I hope you meant "replacing the radar". They're not that expensive and are extremely useful when the fog rolls in suddenly and ships are about, which is not unknown in the areas you sail.

I hope this does not sound too bonkers given the boat I have bought

I resent the windage, and impact on air flow

Plus all that weight up there

Radar is a battery killer and I  can have ais on the phone

I had it on harmony and a fog came down in the shetlands

It was good to see where the above surface rocks were but tells you nothing about the below surface ones and the lobster pots

However, without it I would have stopped and drifted for the half hour it took to  clear

Or I could have retraced my track on the GPS

My main form of defence is to not be out there or run for the shallows where the big bastards cannot get yoO

I am comfortable following the 3m contour around these coasts

I like being close enough to the shore to be able to see and hear the birds

 

 

5 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

Radar means big power demand and complexity. Not an East coast thing. The old boys just sail onto a depth contour and follow it.

I am that old bloke

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20 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

Radar means big power demand and complexity. Not an East coast thing. The old boys just sail onto a depth contour and follow it.

That's literally how my grandparents sailed. Aim to miss the "destination" by one side, hit the 4 fathom line with a lead line, turn port/starboard and look for the buoy. However, since the advent of GPS, I've seen a lot of those 4 fathom marks removed in the US - actually a lot of marks have been removed. 

I spend a decent amount of time in fog. Radar is a nice-to-have, but very helpful showing where things are not, confirming the range and bearing of those sounds you heard - you still get a feeling of relief when the buoy you're aiming at and seeing on the radar is what you think it is. 

It's not such a battery killer if you keep it on standby and use closer range. Newer units are parsimonious. 

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I think you'd be surprised by how light and how power-efficient the modern solid state units are. 

Your decision, of course, but after one too many scary and truly dangerous experiences with sudden fog, I decided I'd never again cruise without radar available.

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The chart plotter is going too

 

The screen is the size of a TV and my uk charts £25 for the whole of the UK are better than the once expensive chart plotter

it is right in my line of site so a tablet is better, less obtrusive and less power drain

I will put a second set on my kindle sized tablet as a back up

I also have one large one general chart and a GPS just in case

The weight and the windage of the radar will be with me every time I sail or pass through chop.

No need to have a paddle wheel log either    it is yet another hole in the hull

 

 

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After nearly 30 seasons of sailing on the coast of Maine, it looks like I will die never having known radar onboard my boats. :) 

 

The only time I've missed it is when I was motoring in channels with other boats around. I don't feel I have to do that these days, I guess I'm lucky. 

 

I've never had refrigeration either and now that small gizmos and LED lighting have lessened our power needs, I doubt I'll see that either.

 

I think some of us enjoy the simplicity over the convenience of some things, at least on a sailboat. 

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Dylan.

First time long time as we say in the States.

Without an oven, you can’t warm up the coffee cake, and life is less pleasant.

I agree about radar because I think AIS and the chart plotter with the boat as curser does more than radar ever did.

I would move it out of your line of sight, but I wouldn’t throw it away.  It’s free for heaven sakes.  Maybe it’s my old age, but I like having more screen area than a phone.  

SHC

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42 minutes ago, Steve Clark said:

Dylan.

First time long time as we say in the States.

Without an oven, you can’t warm up the coffee cake, and life is less pleasant.

I agree about radar because I think AIS and the chart plotter with the boat as curser does more than radar ever did.

I would move it out of your line of sight, but I wouldn’t throw it away.  It’s free for heaven sakes.  Maybe it’s my old age, but I like having more screen area than a phone.  

SHC

A have a really thick frying pan with a thick glass lid

With that and a trivet in the bottom I can heat pies

I have also had some success with bannocks in the pan

I enjoy the simplicity

As for a fridge

I sail in the British Isles

we drink Red wine rather than white, drink atomised long life milk

We miss ice in the g and t

But whisky or rum is good warmish

D

 

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45 minutes ago, Steve Clark said:

Dylan.

First time long time as we say in the States.

Without an oven, you can’t warm up the coffee cake, and life is less pleasant.

I agree about radar because I think AIS and the chart plotter with the boat as curser does more than radar ever did.

I would move it out of your line of sight, but I wouldn’t throw it away.  It’s free for heaven sakes.  Maybe it’s my old age, but I like having more screen area than a phone.  

SHC

A decent tablet has more screen area than my Simrad G09 plotter. I can see why Dylan wants to remove the old monster. His boat ticks all the boxes for use of a tablet IMO - secure and dry environment, out of direct sunlight that can cause them to overheat, easy supply of power without compromising waterproof enclosures etc. Those are the 3 things that caused me to buy a Simrad as I don't have a protected wheelhouse.

Radar - agree the *MODERN* units are a lot smaller and use a fraction of the power but then you have to buy one. Always can be done later, meanwhile if you don't want/like it, get rid of it. Less clutter & cables.

I disagree about meths but that's a personal choice thing. Least calorific content of all common fuels and here at least, most expensive. I'll stick with LPG. But 2 of my friends have kero stoves, another couple have meths, nobody has starved yet so - shrug. Whatever makes the cook happy is a good rule.

FKT

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Radar is the only tool available for you to actively  watchkeep in low visibility. It really extends the range of prudent options on a passage. It many parts of the world you'd be at a severe disadvantage without.

The new radars only use 20 Watts when running, they are quick to start and use virtually nothing on standby. They are safe to stand adjacent to when working, and on a calm surface will even show lobster pot floats. 

If you only want horizon they only need a short pole. They don't need a dedicated display and will display and be controlled from many modern chart plotters and certainly any Open CPN platform with a free plugin.  Cables are just power and the data cable and data are standard computer packets over CAT5 . The cat 5 can be replaced by any computer wireless network setup. A laptop running open CPN is a good option.

No longer Valve sets that took 5 minutes to give black and white grainy images on a "TV set" and ran your battery flat.  Now you can run them for 10 hours full power at 12v for a measly 20 Amp Hours.

Get into a safe harbour through a mooring field just once, in conditions where you would have stood out to sea, and you are a convert for life.

 

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

A decent tablet has more screen area than my Simrad G09 plotter. I can see why Dylan wants to remove the old monster. His boat ticks all the boxes for use of a tablet IMO - secure and dry environment, out of direct sunlight that can cause them to overheat, easy supply of power without compromising waterproof enclosures etc. Those are the 3 things that caused me to buy a Simrad as I don't have a protected wheelhouse.

Radar - agree the *MODERN* units are a lot smaller and use a fraction of the power but then you have to buy one. Always can be done later, meanwhile if you don't want/like it, get rid of it. Less clutter & cables.

I disagree about meths but that's a personal choice thing. Least calorific content of all common fuels and here at least, most expensive. I'll stick with LPG. But 2 of my friends have kero stoves, another couple have meths, nobody has starved yet so - shrug. Whatever makes the cook happy is a good rule.

FKT

I always wondered why my parents boat had a SS plate over the meths stove until a "guest" on the boat flared it up. 

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2 hours ago, dylan winter said:

A have a really thick frying pan with a thick glass lid

With that and a trivet in the bottom I can heat pies

I have also had some success with bannocks in the pan

I enjoy the simplicity

As for a fridge

I sail in the British Isles

we drink Red wine rather than white, drink atomised long life milk

We miss ice in the g and t

But whisky or rum is good warmish

D

 

And your beer is room temperature...

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As far as tablets go, there is a range of cheap Lenovo’s without a SIM card facility but with a built in GPS, I stumbled on a new 7” one for $40, downloaded Navionics charts at home on the wifi, works well enough.

Not as fast as an iPad but does the job, liked it so much I paid full price for a 10” unit that just lives on the boat, cost around $150 IIRC.

Thats pacific pesos, not US dollars

But I like all my electronics to be stand alone, only link on the boats is older GPS units to AIS receivers

The touch screen facility on tablets is also much easier to use than our older Garmin...

 

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9 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

And your beer is room temperature...

... and actually tastes good that way!

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16 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

... and actually tastes good that way!

As long as the room is in an ice cave.

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I've spent a good bit of time in the UK, but I never had a room temperature beer....Must have been in the wrong places. 

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20 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I've spent a good bit of time in the UK, but I never had a room temperature beer....Must have been in the wrong places. 

You just have to look for the Lucas sign.

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48 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

As far as tablets go, there is a range of cheap Lenovo’s without a SIM card facility but with a built in GPS, I stumbled on a new 7” one for $40, downloaded Navionics charts at home on the wifi, works well enough.

Not as fast as an iPad but does the job, liked it so much I paid full price for a 10” unit that just lives on the boat, cost around $150 IIRC.

Thats pacific pesos, not US dollars

But I like all my electronics to be stand alone, only link on the boats is older GPS units to AIS receivers

The touch screen facility on tablets is also much easier to use than our older Garmin...

 

I've got that same 7" Lenovo, which replaced my late great Nexus 7. It's not bad.

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

I've spent a good bit of time in the UK, but I never had a room temperature beer....Must have been in the wrong places. 

 

The ales that come out of those hand pump thingies are usually room temperature.

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5 hours ago, savoir said:

 

The ales that come out of those hand pump thingies are usually room temperature.

Nope. Cellar temperature. Much cooler.

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13 hours ago, MikeJohns said:

Radar is the only tool available for you to actively  watchkeep in low visibility. It really extends the range of prudent options on a passage. It many parts of the world you'd be at a severe disadvantage without.

I agree but I think it really depends where you sail. TBH I've spent too many hours guestimating the bearing of fog horns and would never remove a functioning radar from a boat (unless may be on a racing boat to save weight). OTOH if you don't have to cross shipping channels you can live without, navigating with a GPS, an attentive lookout in poor visibility and an echo sounder. If you see a fishing boat coming out of nowhere, you can always crash tack or crash gybe to avoid it, obviously that doesn't work with tankers.

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AIS is pretty universal, at least as far as I have seen, certainly all of the big things!  All vessels with AIS show up on my screen.  So what I don’t see in the fog are things not on the chart and vessels without AIS; icebergs, floating containers, marine mammals.  I guess I am taking chances, but I am comfortable.  It takes a fuck load less talent than when I was a kid. You had to find your way around with a stop watch, a compass, and buggerallelse.

SHC

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17 hours ago, MikeJohns said:

Radar is the only tool available for you to actively  watchkeep in low visibility. It really extends the range of prudent options on a passage. It many parts of the world you'd be at a severe disadvantage without.

The new radars only use 20 Watts when running, they are quick to start and use virtually nothing on standby. They are safe to stand adjacent to when working, and on a calm surface will even show lobster pot floats. 

If you only want horizon they only need a short pole. They don't need a dedicated display and will display and be controlled from many modern chart plotters and certainly any Open CPN platform with a free plugin.  Cables are just power and the data cable and data are standard computer packets over CAT5 . The cat 5 can be replaced by any computer wireless network setup. A laptop running open CPN is a good option.

No longer Valve sets that took 5 minutes to give black and white grainy images on a "TV set" and ran your battery flat.  Now you can run them for 10 hours full power at 12v for a measly 20 Amp Hours.

Get into a safe harbour through a mooring field just once, in conditions where you would have stood out to sea, and you are a convert for life.

 

I think many are somewhat (and understandably) intimidated or at least puzzled by radar - I know I was (and still am, as a novice).  It’s not easy to learn to use.  Two key things, of course - you cannot simply switch it on and —presto— it provides useful info.  You must practice and get to understand/get a feel for setting gain, range, and sea and rain clutter to optimize what you’re seeing.  Second, what you’re seeing on the display.  Those who’ve never used radar will not have much clue at all how to interpret the display: that’s a real learned skill.  That being said, once you get a basic feel for it, Dylan (after, yes, pouring through a book and actively using it in good conditions as practice - that’s the hard part, I think), even with a simple/older radar set, the basic ability to very quickly and easily put an “electronic bearing line” and “variable range marker” (more radar lingo...) on an object on the screen in obscured visibility, be it fog, heavy rain, or dark - especially if you can reference the object to known things on your chart, like a large buoy, small island(s), or a headland —is incredible.  Very simple navigation and collision avoidance tools once you get a basic feel for interpreting the odd-looking light patterns on the screen!

In short, despite windage concerns (rather minimal IMHO), I’d keep it if already installed and not ancient (i.e., not a huge power hog).  A Canadian Coast Guard veteran and former commercial fisherman I did a short radar course with said the only three things he truly wants for coastal navigation are (1) compass and charts (paper charts are fine); (2) VHF; and (3) radar.  Ya don’t need GPS if you know how to use radar —and radar also provides a tool for collision avoidance (more broadly than just AIS).

Have a look: http://www.shipwrite.bc.ca/radar.htm

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I think many are somewhat (and understandably) intimidated or at least puzzled by radar - I know I was (and still am, as a novice).  It’s not easy to learn to use.  Two key things, of course - you cannot simply switch it on and —presto— it provides useful info.  You must practice and get to understand/get a feel for setting gain, range, and sea and rain clutter to optimize what you’re seeing.  Second, what you’re seeing on the display.  Those who’ve never used radar will not have much clue at all how to interpret the display: that’s a real learned skill.  That being said, once you get a basic feel for it, Dylan (after, yes, pouring through a book and actively using it in good conditions as practice - that’s the hard part, I think), even with a simple/older radar set, the basic ability to very quickly and easily put an “electronic bearing line” and “variable range marker” (more radar lingo...) on an object on the screen in obscured visibility, be it fog, heavy rain, or dark - especially if you can reference the object to known things on your chart, like a large buoy, small island(s), or a headland —is incredible.  Very simple navigation and collision avoidance tools once you get a basic feel for interpreting the odd-looking light patterns on the screen!

In short, despite windage concerns (rather minimal IMHO), I’d keep it if already installed and not ancient (i.e., not a huge power hog).  A Canadian Coast Guard veteran and former commercial fisherman I did a short radar course with said the only three things he truly wants for coastal navigation are (1) compass and charts (paper charts are fine); (2) VHF; and (3) radar.  Ya don’t need GPS if you know how to use radar —and radar also provides a tool for collision avoidance (more broadly than just AIS).

Have a look: http://www.shipwrite.bc.ca/radar.htm

There's a lot of variability with different radar models and installation.

Use it in clear weather and you quickly get a feel for what things "look" like, how the filters work, and how things move on the screen. 

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5 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I think many are somewhat (and understandably) intimidated or at least puzzled by radar - I know I was (and still am, as a novice).  It’s not easy to learn to use. ................

With auto settings and chart overlay it's quite a different ballgame to the old sets. It's much more intuitive .

 

8 hours ago, Panoramix said:

I agree but I think it really depends where you sail..........

Sure, if I sail in good visibility, even on night passages  I never turn the radar on even with ships around, it's just not necessary. 

 

One note mariners who are familiar with radar is that the newer radars are not powerful enough to trigger RACON beacons.  

 

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I think you guys thinking radar is the best are misunderstanding our friend's approach. 

Just a guess, but if it's foggy, he's not moving. 

Doesn't seem like a guy beholden to the calendar.

 

My apologies Dylan if I misunderstand.

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It's not the fog around you when you're thinking of leaving. It's the fog that envelops you when you're well underway...

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Out here on the wet coast, AIS is helpful except for the 3000 fishing boats blasting around in the fog at high speed without. Radar shows you all the boats.

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This ^

A friend put AIS on his boat and on a week long cruise up island it appeared to be little more than a curiosity - I'd estimate it picked up far less than 1/2 the boats around us.

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

It's not the fog around you when you're thinking of leaving. It's the fog that envelops you when you're well underway...

 Yes !   It's invaluable when visibility has become poor. Even heavy rain can make visual watchkeeping ineffectual at times.

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While radar can obviously be very important in some locations for some people I think many are falling to understand these circumstances.

The Southern East coast on the UK is shallow. We sail much of the time where big boats can never reach, so they're not going to run you down. We're also lucky with fog. Fog is reasonably rare, well forecast, predominantly occurs early in the morning and burns off. For someone mostly day sailing and not in a hurry it's not really an issue.

For a simple boat in his area I'd want a decent echo sounder. After that I'm good with a paper chart, a handheld GPS and a small fridge would be nice luxury items.

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2 hours ago, European Bloke said:

While radar can obviously be very important in some locations for some people I think many are falling to understand these circumstances.

The Southern East coast on the UK is shallow. We sail much of the time where big boats can never reach, so they're not going to run you down. We're also lucky with fog. Fog is reasonably rare, well forecast, predominantly occurs early in the morning and burns off. For someone mostly day sailing and not in a hurry it's not really an issue.

Yes, but Dylan is planning on taking the Whale to far more challenging cruising grounds... I'd definitely want radar up in Scotland.

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1 hour ago, Jim in Halifax said:

Yes, but Dylan is planning on taking the Whale to far more challenging cruising grounds... I'd definitely want radar up in Scotland.

I've sailed on and off for 20 years on the UK south and east coast, Scotland, North sea and Baltic. In all that time there's only been two occasions where I wished I had radar (and even then it was more a 'nice to have' rather than 'must have'). All other times caught in fog or poor visibility there has been no pressing need for radar. Yes, sometimes I changed my plans (e.g. alternate destination) or changed my route (get inshore into shallow waters) but isn't that what sailings about.

Radar, chart plotters etc. cost money. I've never owned a boat bigger than 24 foot or worth more than £5,000. But I've sailed further than many cruisers do in a boat twice the size (UK - Estonia and back, circumnavigation of the UK etc. If iId had to spend money on radar etc. I probably wouldn't have gone. My interpretation of Dylan's spending habits is that he's of a similar view (Sorry Dylan for making assumptions on your behalf!)

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14 minutes ago, Jackett said:

I've sailed on and off for 20 years on the UK south and east coast, Scotland, North sea and Baltic. In all that time there's only been two occasions where I wished I had radar (and even then it was more a 'nice to have' rather than 'must have'). All other times caught in fog or poor visibility there has been no pressing need for radar. Yes, sometimes I changed my plans (e.g. alternate destination) or changed my route (get inshore into shallow waters) but isn't that what sailings about.

Radar, chart plotters etc. cost money. I've never owned a boat bigger than 24 foot or worth more than £5,000. But I've sailed further than many cruisers do in a boat twice the size (UK - Estonia and back, circumnavigation of the UK etc. If iId had to spend money on radar etc. I probably wouldn't have gone. My interpretation of Dylan's spending habits is that he's of a similar view (Sorry Dylan for making assumptions on your behalf!)

You're not related are you ?  ;-)

 

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What I want to know is how Dylan will use the new boat as a video platform. His sailing footage from his boats has been top-notch. I think that is partly due to the fact he could fold down the spray hood (dodger). Lens aimed over the bow with sails in the frame, this gave a great sense of sailing and place. 

The new boat with the pilothouse will be a new challenge. He can make it sail, we'll have that. But how will he bring the viewer aboard as he has in the past?

I look forward to how he works this out. 

He still has the aft view: 

492658078_Foggywake(1of1).thumb.jpg.14e0982b1cdbb6ca341782974b677446.jpg

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I have no doubt that Dylan will rise to the challenge. Especially without a pesky radar pole or chart plotter in the way of the shot!

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Perhaps he'll use the poor man's drone.  An iphone on a stick.

 

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3 hours ago, Jackett said:

I've sailed on and off for 20 years on the UK south and east coast, Scotland,

Radar, chart plotters etc. cost money. I've never owned a boat bigger than 24 foot

We never had radar for years and years either, up to Alaska and back and lots of local sailing without.  Depends where you are.  Up in Alaska, we were *very* nearly down by a 50-60 ft  fishing boat one afternoon when fog suddenly descended - boat appeared out of nowhere.  Shit happens.  We got lucky.  
 

I recently got a radar for free - a perfectly working, new-enough cast off (with manual) from someone upgrading - good enough for now!  But I agree, if you can’t afford it, it’s not essential —however, depending where you’re sailing, one could be taking a risk without it.  In any case, in Dylan’s situation, I don’t think it’s about the cost - his new boat came with (presumably a somewhat older) radar, and he’s determining whether or not to keep it.  It’s a toss up - I can totally see wanting to remove clutter/windage...then again, it’s already there and is a potentially useful tool if you ever need it (and know how to use it).  (And, operating a radar from a pilot house, as he has, with windows, while at the helm, out of the weather —paradise!  So very different from most sailboats.)

On the topic of on-board clutter removal - below is the irrepressible and very talented sailor Alex Whitworth (formerly of the rightly famed Berrimilla) streamlining on-board clutter —ridding himself of the pesky Portapotty (major cabin clutter, and which doesn’t work so well on a mostly open 18 footer with two people onboard...).  And you can bet the cat in the second pic removed its non-motorized auxiliary propulsion when no longer needed (after Race to Alaska)! :-)  

(I sometimes look back at our two transom-mounted poles, with radar and wind generator each, two appendages the boat has sprouted over the years, and think longingly of the simpler, more streamlined days with less stuff on-board...also before we had a boxy, nested hard dinghy lashed on deck aft of the mast —just had a small roll up inflatable tucked away.  But the inflatable was terrible for rowing and couldn’t sail and the poles will provide a quasi-arch solution to mount future solar panels between them, a necessary alternative energy source for offshore cruising farther afield (and there’s nowhere else on board to easily mount solar panels)...and so the clutter grows :-)  

0BAE49BA-AE4B-447A-B2DA-6818920DF525.jpeg

7DA784A7-419E-458C-8512-3C094B64B107.jpeg

E9844C21-4BD1-441F-B6E7-C8C28BC4C001.jpeg

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I think Dylan’s on the right track... okay, I’d be thinking like him...    An old, power hungry,  seldom used radar probably isn’t worth it’s weight or ‘view obstruction’ 99% of the time.  Prudent avoidance of fog conditions will help as well and the big boys have AIS so the risks are small.

Now, when he hits it big with his Patreon Patrons*, a nice new solid state broadband radar connected to his tablet might just show up...

* I know, not on the list....but

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Anyway, radar is inevitable as we humans are pushed into the future by Big Tech... :-)

Google’s Project Soli five years ago - radar that works at a sub-millimeter scale (can detect and convert into other signals minute human finger movements, and at high speed with great positional accuracy): 

 


And, now, just today, radar has infiltrated regular devices in your home.  First major use of radar in a consumer device...don’t worry: the future is friendly, I’m quite sure...really, there’s nothing to worry about...”we’re actually interpreting human intent,” as a guy in the video above says (personally, I’d Keep Turning Left, too, to avoid all this useless stuff !!  :-) :-)  )

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/10/12/google-announces-new-nest-thermostat-with-soli-radar.html

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6 hours ago, Jackett said:

I've sailed on and off for 20 years on the UK south and east coast, Scotland, North sea and Baltic. In all that time there's only been two occasions where I wished I had radar (and even then it was more a 'nice to have' rather than 'must have'). All other times caught in fog or poor visibility there has been no pressing need for radar. Yes, sometimes I changed my plans (e.g. alternate destination) or changed my route (get inshore into shallow waters) but isn't that what sailings about.

Radar, chart plotters etc. cost money. I've never owned a boat bigger than 24 foot or worth more than £5,000. But I've sailed further than many cruisers do in a boat twice the size (UK - Estonia and back, circumnavigation of the UK etc. If iId had to spend money on radar etc. I probably wouldn't have gone. My interpretation of Dylan's spending habits is that he's of a similar view (Sorry Dylan for making assumptions on your behalf!)

Now, now...you seem to not recognize that we are full into the CA equivalent of Godwin's law https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin's_law where in someone proposes something and all and sundry inform them what a fucking terrible idea it is.  All that is left to reach the pinnacle of the CA law is for someone to declare that should this course of action continue, the protagonist will "most certainly die".

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1 hour ago, chester said:

Now, now...you seem to not recognize that we are full into the CA equivalent of Godwin's law https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin's_law where in someone proposes something and all and sundry inform them what a fucking terrible idea it is.  All that is left to reach the pinnacle of the CA law is for someone to declare that should this course of action continue, the protagonist will "most certainly die".

Nazi.

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I am back aboard in Grimsby fish dock

Jill has taken the car back

i have enough  clean socks for seven days

Winds in the north east

Up to 20 mph

 

Making wells next the sea a bit iffy

So will spend two days exploring grimsby by bike

Wind Easing down Thursday

Journey time is about 36 hours at 5 knots from grimsby  to deben bar

It looks as though an overnight will be hard to avoid

 But it is  a quiet stretch of coast

Friday night most of the  commercial stuff will have stopped so that might be a good bet

Lobster pots at night are the biggest fear

 

D

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

I am back aboard in Grimsby fish dock

Jill has taken the car back

i have enough  clean socks for seven days

Winds in the north east

Up to 20 mph

 

Making wells next the sea a bit iffy

So will spend two days exploring grimsby by bike

Wind Easing down Thursday

Journey time is about 36 hours at 5 knots from grimsby  to deben bar

It looks as though an overnight will be hard to avoid

 But it is  a quiet stretch of coast

Friday night most of the  commercial stuff will have stopped so that might be a good bet

Lobster pots at night are the biggest fear

 

D

 

 

 

gonna need a smidge more than 20 seconds Dylan.  I could watch the heater like the "fireplace" video on cable TV!.  

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Huh...I've never thought of clean socks as a rate-limiter when cruising. 

 

 

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When I read you're at Grimsby fish dock, I think of that scene in the book, Boat That Wouldn't Float, when the Newfies fill Farley Mowatts boat with fish gurry.

Don't park below any big pipes. 

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4 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Anyway, radar is inevitable as we humans are pushed into the future by Big Tech... :-)

Google’s Project Soli five years ago - radar that works at a sub-millimeter scale (can detect and convert into other signals minute human finger movements, and at high speed with great positional accuracy): 

 


And, now, just today, radar has infiltrated regular devices in your home.  First major use of radar in a consumer device...don’t worry: the future is friendly, I’m quite sure...really, there’s nothing to worry about...”we’re actually interpreting human intent,” as a guy in the video above says (personally, I’d Keep Turning Left, too, to avoid all this useless stuff !!  :-) :-)  )

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/10/12/google-announces-new-nest-thermostat-with-soli-radar.html

First major use of radar in a consumer device....

I think not

610ptyvekxl-sl1000-1563196528.jpg?crop=1

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