IStream

Dylan's New Boat Anarchy

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, IStream said:

You were a fine man, Dylan. Please let us know where to send condolences.

You guys'll be hitting on his wife at the funeral. ;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He knew the rules of the game when he got on the pitch.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2020 at 3:17 AM, dylan winter said:

I like the idea of a evenings in the cabin while moored up an East anglia creek  with old tec diesel heater and a good mobile broadband tablet with Spotify music, every radio station in the world, 50 books on kindle and old reruns of the Adams family and Seinfeld on you tube, sailing anarchy politics to marvel at

And overwintering east anglia birds to watch during the day while eating an egg banjo for brekki

d

 

hummn , I'm a mite thirsty .........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2020 at 8:20 PM, dylan winter said:

Lobster pots at night are the biggest fear

Yep

Ambassador.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent this morning removing the cute whale graphic, jury rigging an echo sounder

And failing to get the fuel pump for the tailor stove to work.

Grimsby fish dock is free flow two hours either side of high tide

So I went out into the humber for two hours to check that the echosounder worked and to give the engine a run

Before leaving g I had to ask the fish dock control permission to go and then ask humber river control permission to go for a sail

 

 

 

Then went out on the bike around  this once great fishing port

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, dylan winter said:

The whale has an offset sliding patio door which is far less substantial than the plastic covered chip board cupboard doors in the kitchen At home

So that is a sign of an obvious death wish

In addition the impending removal of the radar wind catcher and roll promoter will make me die

I have a metho stove and uncleaned taylor so co death is upon me

I have three gallons of petrol on board ..... boom

I might drink warm beer ... a well known component of any suicide attempt

I will also drink instant coffee while underway in a boat where I removed all the drink holders

 

 

 

 

That aside

The winds are hardest weds and die away to almost nothing by Friday Sat and Sunday

that looks like the easiest window

D

 

 

Dylan was doing fine until he mentioned the warm beer.  Cold tea and warm beer is an evil combination loved only by the British.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know where Americans got this idea that British/Irish people eat corned beef & potatoes. To most Brits, corned beef comes in a square can -  Fray Bentos brand, preferably. It goes into sandwiches, or corned beef hash.

I was born & raised in Liverpool, which has a big Irish community, and I never saw a St Patrick's Day celebration until I emigrated to USA....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, chester said:

the heater isn't working?  FUUUUCK....NOOOO!

He can always set fire to his bog brush, probably burn for days.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

He can always set fire to his bog brush, probably burn for days.

Health & Safety might need to intervene. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Pilott said:

I don't know where Americans got this idea that British/Irish people eat corned beef & potatoes. To most Brits, corned beef comes in a square can -  Fray Bentos brand, preferably. It goes into sandwiches, or corned beef hash.

I was born & raised in Liverpool, which has a big Irish community, and I never saw a St Patrick's Day celebration until I emigrated to USA....

 

Because there is a video on this thread of a prominent British nautical identity eating them.  Irish eating habits have nothing to do with it.  On the other hand if you are saying that eating corned beef and cabbage while wearing a silly green hat and doing a poor Barry Fitzgerald impersonation is an American thing, well you would be right there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, savoir said:

warm beer.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pilott said:

I don't know where Americans got this idea that British/Irish people eat corned beef & potatoes. To most Brits, corned beef comes in a square can -  Fray Bentos brand, preferably. It goes into sandwiches, or corned beef hash.

I was born & raised in Liverpool, which has a big Irish community, and I never saw a St Patrick's Day celebration until I emigrated to USA....

Me, this summer, initiating my newly-minted sailing coach teenage daughter, into the fine old nautical tradition of corned beef on-board...

08B9833E-2E83-49A8-92F0-301782143C14.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rust on the plate, rust on the opening pliers, rust on the can. All is as it should be.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marca Nozaki de carne de vacuno corned 3.53 oz ~ 4 piezas

US$ 63.85

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, IStream said:

Rust on the plate, rust on the opening pliers, rust on the can. All is as it should be.

And smile on the face after opening  :-)  

(Looks awful, was her conclusion, and tastes great fried up with onions and potatoes!)

CA85481E-8637-4112-88FB-7674552881B7.jpeg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's nowt wrong with Hereford corned beef, it's still a staple on our boat.

With enough time and money, I still prefer cooking up a brisket and pressing it in a bowl. We used to do the same with a beef tongue, pressure cooker for an hour or so, cram it into a small bowl with a car battery on top, delicious the next day.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Ishmael said:

There's nowt wrong with Hereford corned beef, it's still a staple on our boat.

With enough time and money, I still prefer cooking up a brisket and pressing it in a bowl. We used to do the same with a beef tongue, pressure cooker for an hour or so, cram it into a small bowl with a car battery on top, delicious the next day.

Tongue is a highly underrated cut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, IStream said:

Tongue is a highly underrated cut.

My child bride refuses to even look at it, let alone eat it. It's tender, it's delicious, and it's all mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mind you , the war is over , there is no need to eat offal any more ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Mid said:

mind you , the war is over , there is no need to eat offal any more ....

Offal? Have you priced tongue lately?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when I first had shorty pants me aunty used to make jellied lambs tongue , excellent along with lambs brains , gotta know how to cook those .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brain is an organ too far for me. I've tried it multiple times and it's never tasted good. Maybe I've just had it poorly prepared. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

My child bride refuses to even look at it, let alone eat it. It's tender, it's delicious, and it's all mine.

My wife loves to eat tongue but won't see it being prepared. By the same token, she can't stand anything with fat, gristle, or sinew and has passed that trait on to my son. I consider it a huge accomplishment that they're now both convinced of the superiority of the chicken thigh over the breast.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, IStream said:

Maybe I've just had it poorly prepared.

most probably , there's an art , fresh as possible , skin 'em , wash in cold water , crumb and fry 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never had brains breaded and fried. I like most everything that is, so I'll seek it out and try it again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Mid said:

when I first had shorty pants me aunty used to make jellied lambs tongue , excellent along with lambs brains , gotta know how to cook those .

Have you tried cow thymus (sweetbreads)? Barbeque until well done with some color. Delicious!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, IStream said:

Have you tried cow thymus (sweetbreads)? Barbeque until well done with some color. Delicious!

I haven't and I know sweetbreads as a differnt organ ..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, IStream said:

Tongue is a highly underrated cut.

My friends and I used to practically live in a deli restaurant owned by a camp survivor. He made the best sandwiches I ever had and the best of them was turkey & tongue on rye with Russian dressing.

 

And then there was his latke.

And his corned beef.

And his blintzes.

And...

He closed down and retired in the mid 80's and I still miss the place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jewish delis seem to be the latest hipster trend in Seattle. This city is a delicatessen dessert so I welcome this trend with open arms. There's a new one not too far from me and I have high hopes...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/11/2020 at 11:33 AM, olaf hart said:

And your beer is room temperature...

This is a myth, but such an all pervading myth in the colonies (such as the USA).... traditionally beer is served at cellar temperature which is quite a different thing

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Weyalan said:

This is a myth, but such an all pervading myth in the colonies (such as the USA).... traditionally beer is served at cellar temperature which is quite a different thing

In the UK the cellar is often warmer than the air temp...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The taylor

I cleaned it yesterday and it ran nicely

The fuel header tank was full when I got the boat

Half a tank over about 12 hours of running

however

The electric pump does not work

I have connected it direct to 12 volts

Nothing

So i could buy another pump and give it a power supply or i could turn it over to manual fill and then run the blighter on paraffin

 

D

20201014-090042.jpg

20201014-085926.jpg

20201014-084444.jpg

 

 

20201014-084415.jpg

 

20201014-084556.jpg

 

20201014-085903.jpg

 

20201014-085907.jpg

20201014-085911.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2020 at 8:20 PM, dylan winter said:

I am back aboard in Grimsby fish dock

Jill has taken the car back

i have enough  clean socks for seven days

Winds in the north east

Up to 20 mph

 

Making wells next the sea a bit iffy

So will spend two days exploring grimsby by bike

Wind Easing down Thursday

Journey time is about 36 hours at 5 knots from grimsby  to deben bar

It looks as though an overnight will be hard to avoid

 But it is  a quiet stretch of coast

Friday night most of the  commercial stuff will have stopped so that might be a good bet

Lobster pots at night are the biggest fear

 

D

 

 

 

Shame to miss Wells, but not an entrance in a stiff Northerly. You'd love Blakey, do you know it? Similar or worse entrance problem to Wells. You might need to dry out there, depending if you managed to get a bouy in the hole. Does The Whale dry?

Perhaps you have to come back another time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

Shame to miss Wells, but not an entrance in a stiff Northerly. You'd love Blakey, do you know it? Similar or worse entrance problem to Wells. You might need to dry out there, depending if you managed to get a bouy in the hole. Does The Whale dry?

Perhaps you have to come back another time.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

Shame to miss Wells, but not an entrance in a stiff Northerly. You'd love Blakey, do you know it? Similar or worse entrance problem to Wells. You might need to dry out there, depending if you managed to get a bouy in the hole. Does The Whale dry?

Perhaps you have to come back another time.

Pretty sure the hole or Pit as its known is not so much of a pit these days as a puddle.
Last time I was in wells some local cruisers told me that it should be possible to stay afloat in the lower harbour at anchor, but at from -/+ 3HW its very exposed as the banks protecting the entrance are covered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Then went out on the bike around  this once great fishing port

 

Once spent a few days passing through Grimsby - that's when I realised where the word grim comes from...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

The taylor

I cleaned it yesterday and it ran nicely

The fuel header tank was full when I got the boat

Half a tank over about 12 hours of running

however

The electric pump does not work

I have connected it direct to 12 volts

Nothing

So i could buy another pump and give it a power supply or i could turn it over to manual fill and then run the blighter on paraffin

 

D

20201014-085926.jpg

20201014-084444.jpg

 

 

20201014-084415.jpg

 

There's your problem Dylan - its a dreaded SU fuel pump by the looks of it. If my MG quit suddenly, it was almost invariably one of those little buggers... there's a set of electrical contacts - points actually - under that black plastic end cap... try cleaning them with some fine emery paper and report back. Or just bin the fucker and replace it with something modern & cheap from the autoparts store.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MiddayGun said:

Pretty sure the hole or Pit as its known is not so much of a pit these days as a puddle.
Last time I was in wells some local cruisers told me that it should be possible to stay afloat in the lower harbour at anchor, but at from -/+ 3HW its very exposed as the banks protecting the entrance are covered.

Ahh pit, that's right. It's a while since I've been there. As you say I've seen it bloody rough in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

There's your problem Dylan - its a dreaded SU fuel pump by the looks of it. If my MG quit suddenly, it was almost invariably one of those little buggers... there's a set of electrical contacts - points actually - under that black plastic end cap... try cleaning them with some fine emery paper and report back. Or just bin the fucker and replace it with something modern & cheap from the autoparts store.

Disintegrated as being dismantled

I think I will convert it into a hand filler

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you splice out the pump and splice in an outboard fuel bulb near the unit, you can fill it underway without any mess. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

Disintegrated as being dismantled

I think I will convert it into a hand filler

 

If you get 24 hours running per fill, certainly seems like the simple way to go. And simple is good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, IStream said:

Jewish delis seem to be the latest hipster trend in Seattle. This city is a delicatessen dessert so I welcome this trend with open arms. There's a new one not too far from me and I have high hopes...

I wish it would happen here - we ain't got a one other than Kaplan's which has always been overpriced and under-portioned.

It's curious too because we have a pretty big Jewish community here.

By the way, I never would have taken you for a hipster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We all have our sordid pasts...

Also, I meant "desert" not "dessert". The fact that I felt the need to correct that tells you how reformed I am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I was checking my youtube feed and it suggested a clip from the 70's country-music variety show Hee-Haw.  I watched it for the novelty and youtube ran with it and now suggests lots of banjo-related videos.  I just realized it's probably because I watched the banjo sandwich video (and gave it a thumb up).  So Dylan be careful how you name the videos or you will lead us all into strange territory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, European Bloke said:

Does The Whale dry?

Fisher's can dry out great.

#.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, OPAL said:

Fisher's can dry out great.

#.jpg

Thanks for posting that

I live in just the right place to do that

Need an almost empty fuel tank though

d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in alaska we'd run the return fuel from the engine through a tank to feed the diesel stove, never had a problem or ran short

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 167149 said:

in alaska we'd run the return fuel from the engine through a tank to feed the diesel stove, never had a problem or ran short

That's a great idea! However some Yanmars don't direct the return fuel back to the main tank but rather to the on-engine fuel filter. No idea how Dylan's is plumbed...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, 167149 said:

in alaska we'd run the return fuel from the engine through a tank to feed the diesel stove, never had a problem or ran short

As long as the overflow leads back to the main tank.

my Yanmar only burns 5% of the fuel pumped to the engine, the rest goes into the fuel return and is used to cool the injectors..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

As long as the overflow leads back to the main tank.

my Yanmar only burns 5% of the fuel pumped to the engine, the rest goes into the fuel return and is used to cool the injectors..

Hmmm, well, better plumb a 'high level' return from the day tank to the fuel tank.  It just wouldn't do to overflow the day tank with all that there fu-ell coming back from the engine...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the topic of heat-

A friend just installed a Wallas 2-burner diesel range/cabin heater.  Wow, is that thing sexy. Sleek, tidy installation. Gets him down to being a "single fuel" boat.

For those of us without the coin to drop on such an appurtenance, here is an excellent article on how to build a safe and effective cabin heater that uses your LPG or meths galley stove inexpensively and it also debunks the flower pot heater:

https://goodoldboat.com/diy-sailboat-cabin-heater/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, olaf hart said:

my Yanmar only burns 5% of the fuel pumped to the engine, the rest goes into the fuel return and is used to cool the injectors..

My Yanmar 3GM has almost no return flow.  I ran it into a bottle once while debugging an issue and after an hour of engine run time there were just a few drops in the bottle. My mechanic told me that isn’t abnormal. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to bang on, but:

https://www.gov.uk/maib-reports/safety-warning-about-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-after-the-loss-of-2-lives-on-the-motor-cruiser-diversion

(It just popped up on linkedIn)

5th fatality since 2014 due to carbon monoxide poisoning on boats, apparently diesel heater leaked fumes into cabin, the 2 guys came back from ashore, stepped onboard, dead shortly after. All for the sake of a cheap alarm. Screwfix is in easy bike ride of where you're moored Dylan. ;)
If you've already got one then good man.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, breezetrees said:

So Dylan be careful how you name the videos or you will lead us all into strange territory.

Have a look here:

(Media coverage on Algotransparency.org: https://algotransparency.org/en/press.html?candidat=Francois Fillon&file=ytrecos-presidentielle-2017-06-10 )

About the project, which aims to help people understand why corporate entities like Google/YouTube don’t necessarily stir you in directions in your best interest...(“hmm, YouTube and Facebook are free, so maybe it  really *is* about keeping you glued to the screen on their sites so that they can make money”   :-) :-) ) https://algotransparency.org/en/demarche.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

Sorry to bang on, but:

https://www.gov.uk/maib-reports/safety-warning-about-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-after-the-loss-of-2-lives-on-the-motor-cruiser-diversion

(It just popped up on linkedIn)

5th fatality since 2014 due to carbon monoxide poisoning on boats, apparently diesel heater leaked fumes into cabin, the 2 guys came back from ashore, stepped onboard, dead shortly after. All for the sake of a cheap alarm. Screwfix is in easy bike ride of where you're moored Dylan. ;)
If you've already got one then good man.

Ok, God damnit I've ordered a CO detector.  I was going to just throw a household detector in the boat but then I read that they generate a lot of false alarms so I found a 12v marine unit.

I hope I can find an unobtrusive, yet exposed, clear area to install this thing. I'm not cluttering up my nice bulkheads with this industrial white box.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Ok, God damnit I've ordered a CO detector.  I was going to just throw a household detector in the boat but then I read that they generate a lot of false alarms so I found a 12v marine unit.

I hope I can find an unobtrusive, yet exposed, clear area to install this thing. I'm not cluttering up my nice bulkheads with this industrial white box.

I put ours above the nav table with a note next to it reminding me to turn on the heater circuit circuit breaker (panel is at nav station) whenever I light the diesel heater (that circuit powers the fuel transfer pump to transfer main fuel tank to heater day tank, and powers the CO detector).  That way, I always see the little green LED - I know it’s on.

Living aboard some years ago, we had that diesel heater running 24/7 for months...took no chances!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I put ours above the nav table with a note next to it reminding me to turn on the heater circuit circuit breaker (panel is at nav station) whenever I light the diesel heater (that circuit powers the fuel transfer pump to transfer main fuel tank to heater day tank, and powers the CO detector).  That way, I always see the little green LED - I know it’s on.

Living aboard some years ago, we had that diesel heater running 24/7 for months...took no chances!

I can't decide how important it is to locate it near the berthing spaces or maybe the center of the cabin.  The nav desk would probably be ideal but it's furthest from the commonly used bunks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put mine above the chart table, I used a household one & no false alarms yet.
No alarms at all actually. But the test works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I can't decide how important it is to locate it near the berthing spaces or maybe the center of the cabin.  The nav desk would probably be ideal but it's furthest from the commonly used bunks.

That just made me think...I never *fully* thought through my installation re: location - I was doing a million projects at the time and simply needed to install one.  And in a very visible, central location that we wouldn’t forget to turn that circuit on when the diesel heater is burning.

I wonder if I can wire in another one (Xintex Fireboy CO detector) in parallel and locate it in our  forward cabin.  (Where you really, really want to be sure CO doesn’t accumulate at night.). Presumably I can do this - winter project!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

I put mine above the chart table, I used a household one & no false alarms yet.
No alarms at all actually. But the test works.

I may have been suckered.  One sailing rag stated that a household unit could be tripped by a boat halfway down the dock firing up their engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/4/2020 at 1:11 AM, dylan winter said:

Do you have a cite for that.

Not being difficult... just curious about the possibility or mechanism involved

 

Dylan

 

ps only form of boat heat on the trailer sailer for five winters      still alive and unharmed by shrapnel

 

https://goodoldboat.com/diy-sailboat-cabin-heater/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ajax said:

I may have been suckered.  One sailing rag stated that a household unit could be tripped by a boat halfway down the dock firing up their engine.

It depends on the model I guess?
The manual for mine is fairly specific about what triggers it, so many ppm for so much time is what does it, there are different thresholds, so with a high PPM it will sound sooner than with less.

I've go this one: https://www.toolstation.com/first-alert-carbon-monoxide-alarm/p58531
 

They've come down in price as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got a normal household CO alarm on our boat, and just recently put a fancy "nautical" one on - actually like the house one better as it shows max ppm recorded on its screen whereas the marine one is just an alarm.  Never had either trigger accidentally from neighbors or anything else, and only time I've seen elevated reading was when we accidentally fired up the engine with the heater on and the boat sealed up tight - turned the chimney into an air intake and smoked us out real quick.  Problem with a well sealed boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like you need better engine room ventilation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Sounds like you need better engine room ventilation.

Certainly true - it's a 1980s boat with a single 3" duct + blower into the engine room - unfortunately engine room is open to the bilges and so to the rest of the boat, and given the layout not much option for adding more ventilation without compromising water-tightness.  We ended up just adding a bus heater so we can heat the boat with the engine when it's on and use the Refleks while we're at anchor or sailing in mild conditions - it struggles once the sea state gets up.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, MiddayGun said:

I put mine above the chart table, I used a household one & no false alarms yet.
No alarms at all actually. But the test works.

Bad position IMO. CO is heavier than air and will displace it. You MUST have the detector lower than your sleeping level at bare minimum.

Mine is just above the cabin sole next to the galley cooker. It's combined LPG and CO so I want it where it detects things before they get to be a problem.

FKT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Bad position IMO. CO is heavier than air and will displace it. You MUST have the detector lower than your sleeping level at bare minimum.

Mine is just above the cabin sole next to the galley cooker. It's combined LPG and CO so I want it where it detects things before they get to be a problem.

FKT

Not that I trust the Trump Administration’s Environmental Protection Agency (no FUCKING way, in fact) —but I assume the basic science stuff they espouse has in fact been vetted by scientists.

CO is slightly lighter than air.  (Therefore CO detectors should be placed about 5 ft above the floor, they say.)  Apparently, because it’s roughly the same molecular weight as air, it readily mixes and rises with warm air.

https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/where-should-i-place-carbon-monoxide-detector


https://healthybuildingscience.com/2013/02/22/carbon-monoxide-facts/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Bad position IMO. CO is heavier than air and will displace it. You MUST have the detector lower than your sleeping level at bare minimum.

Mine is just above the cabin sole next to the galley cooker. It's combined LPG and CO so I want it where it detects things before they get to be a problem.

FKT

Incorrect, CO is actually slightly lighter than air, but for all practical purposes it mixes.
When deciding where to place it, the chart table ended up as the best option, its around the height of the bunks (well a little higher but not much) and in the main saloon area, I've only got a small 28' boat with an open plan cabin, so its a great central location.

In your case as your detector is LPG as well as CO you need it low down as LPG is heavier than air, I do have a gas detector as well, & that's low down as you described near the stove.

https://healthybuildingscience.com/2013/02/22/carbon-monoxide-facts/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, MiddayGun said:

Incorrect, CO is actually slightly lighter than air, but for all practical purposes it mixes.
When deciding where to place it, the chart table ended up as the best option, its around the height of the bunks (well a little higher but not much) and in the main saloon area, I've only got a small 28' boat with an open plan cabin, so its a great central location.

In your case as your detector is LPG as well as CO you need it low down as LPG is heavier than air, I do have a gas detector as well, & that's low down as you described near the stove.

https://healthybuildingscience.com/2013/02/22/carbon-monoxide-facts/

OK I stand corrected - must have been thinking LPG not CO. Mine is a combined unit and the recommendation was to place it low.

FKT

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

.......must have been thinking LPG not CO. Mine is a combined unit and the recommendation was to place it low.

FKT

CO just becomes another component of the mixed gas we call air.  It's the same molecular weight as Nitrogen ( main component of air )and disperses evenly,  it doesn't rise, just as Oxygen and CO2 don't separate out on the floor. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Bad position IMO. CO is heavier than air and will displace it. You MUST have the detector lower than your sleeping level at bare minimum.

Mine is just above the cabin sole next to the galley cooker. It's combined LPG and CO so I want it where it detects things before they get to be a problem.

FKT

Incorrect. CO is slightly lighter than air:

https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/where-should-i-place-carbon-monoxide-detector

Oops, you already saw that. In any case, the EPA says to put it near sleeping areas but...what if the whole area is a "sleeping area?"  I think I have a place in the center of the cabin where I think I can place it out of sight while also being well exposed to the cabin air for sampling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Incorrect. CO is slightly lighter than air:

https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/where-should-i-place-carbon-monoxide-detector

Oops, you already saw that. In any case, the EPA says to put it near sleeping areas but...what if the whole area is a "sleeping area?"  I think I have a place in the center of the cabin where I think I can place it out of sight while also being well exposed to the cabin air for sampling.

Simple answer - hang it around your neck.

Disclaimer: I don't currently have a boat so I can freely fling poo from the sidelines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Black Sox said:

Simple answer - hang it around your neck.

Disclaimer: I don't currently have a boat so I can freely fling poo from the sidelines.

That would be uncomfortable given that mine needs to be wired to the boat's electrical system. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In commercial setting we put alarms near to sources, not just near to people, so the gas is detected as early as possible. Two alarms, high and low, are more than twice as good as one, as gas will move depending on its temperature. Thus , for example, warm lpg will rise at source, flow across the ceiling, drop down against a cold wall (e.g. fwd bulkhead) then flow into the fwd cabin at floor level. A low level lpg alarm at the source will miss this, as would a high alarm in the fwd berth. Alarms are cheap and should be linked together so one sets off all. False positives are annoying but better than death.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you think about it, death by CO poisoning isn't really a bad way to go.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Slim said:

If you think about it, death by CO poisoning isn't really a bad way to go.

True story:

A submarine I served on, held a series of fire drills. It was the cook's job to configure the Operations Compartment, Middle Level ventilation system to isolate that compartment from the fire to avoid feeding the fire and prevent circulating smoke into Ops middle level.

After the drills were complete, the cook failed to normalize the ventilation line-up. As a result, the adjacent compartment (bow compartment) was still isolated. The bow compartment was primarily berthing and the emergency diesel generator was beneath the berthing area. The watertight hatch was wide open (as per normal) but air doesn't circulate effectively through the hatch, it circulates via the ventilation system.

About 6 hours after the drill, all of us in the bow compartment were rousted from our bunks and dragged to Ops middle level into the fresh air. CO2 had built to dangerous levels by all us sleeping slobs. My headache was absolutely blinding. I could barely function. The mess deck lights were blinding. It took me hours to recover.

The forward compartment roving watch randomly samples the atmosphere in the various compartments via CAMS (Central Atmosphere Monitoring System) and it ended up being several hours before he randomly selected the bow compartment and detected the high CO2 level. That was when he reported the problem and the on-watch crew started dragging us out of the bow.

I absolutely would have slept right to my death.

@hump101 I am not plastering the bulkheads with detectors on my little boat to achieve total coverage. You're still thinking in a large, commercial mindset. Think closet sized spaces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Ajax said:

 

@hump101 I am not plastering the bulkheads with detectors on my little boat to achieve total coverage. You're still thinking in a large, commercial mindset. Think closet sized spaces.

I also worked on subs.

Commercial mindset, yes, but you will know that the size of the space is inversely proportional to the risk. Far more dangerous in a small space with a large source that the other way around. You don't need to plaster your bulkhead with detectors, just think carefully about how gas flows and is ventilated in your space, and install accordingly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uh-oh, the submarine guys are here... :ph34r:

(I still remember that line from the classic WW2 movie, “Das Boot” - the Nazi submariners are being hunted or something and have to lay low/be quiet on board...anyway this dialogue - to help illustrate, I think, one aspect of life aboard a sub, the boredom interspersed with sheer terror in times of war, anyway):

Guy picks boogers from his nose and flicks them at guy2.
Guy2: Eyyyy..... 
Booger guy: How about you take your nose hair, I take mine, we braid them together into beautiful art!” 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years ago, we visited my daughter in Cambridge, MA. At that time, she had twins of toddler age, and took them about in a Toyota. I went somewhere or other in the Toyota and noted an exhaust-like smell. I lectured her on the dangers of CO and faulty exhaust systems, and after I got home, I obsessed about it to the point of buying a house-type CO monitor and sending it to her. Shortly thereafter, she reported that a mechanic had determined the smell was due to a small oil leak hitting a hot part in the engine compartment.

The following winter, the Boston area had a monumental amount of snow. Pictures showed snow 5 or 6 feet deep in a lot of places, and sidewalks were mostly impassable, and many cars were totally locked in by snow and ice. Eventually, they found the occasion to free up their car. They had it running to defrost the windshield, etc. while they shoveled and scraped outside. The CO monitor was still in the car and started honking. The car, in it's ice vault, could not circulate air properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Abrupt change of topic-

Dylan, why didn't you take one of these gentlemen up on their offer of a free, massive yacht? Could you not afford the administrative fees?

 

 

Honestly, I've watched years of British TV. Sometimes I really wonder about you folks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Ajax said:

Abrupt change of topic-

Dylan, why didn't you take one of these gentlemen up on their offer of a free, massive yacht? Could you not afford the administrative fees?

 

 

Honestly, I've watched years of British TV. Sometimes I really wonder about you folks.

just run of the mill ordinary Blokes.... nothing to wonder about at all

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

A few years ago, we visited my daughter in Cambridge, MA. At that time, she had twins of toddler age, and took them about in a Toyota. I went somewhere or other in the Toyota and noted an exhaust-like smell. I lectured her on the dangers of CO and faulty exhaust systems, and after I got home, I obsessed about it to the point of buying a house-type CO monitor and sending it to her. Shortly thereafter, she reported that a mechanic had determined the smell was due to a small oil leak hitting a hot part in the engine compartment.

The following winter, the Boston area had a monumental amount of snow. Pictures showed snow 5 or 6 feet deep in a lot of places, and sidewalks were mostly impassable, and many cars were totally locked in by snow and ice. Eventually, they found the occasion to free up their car. They had it running to defrost the windshield, etc. while they shoveled and scraped outside. The CO monitor was still in the car and started honking. The car, in it's ice vault, could not circulate air properly.

Iced-in cars have suffocated people... used to be a fairly common occurrence in the Midwest duri