Pung boy

WARNING? Structural Integrity Issues; RS FEVA?

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Hello everyone 

 

A couple of days ago a club member asked me about cracks appearing in a Feva Hulls. As a Feva owner myself, he asked if this was normal. It seems a number of club boats have started  to form cracks originating from the drain hole at the mast base. 3 boats so far have the same issue. I have just checked my boat and it appears it also has a crack coming out of this same point in the hull. 

Has any other owner seen this? All that is needed to check is phone place under the beach trolley, take a photo. I will attempt to collect evidence of these cracks over the next few days. 

You can see by this pic that mine is only about 10cm in length, this is rather small compared to other boats from what I was told.

AD84BC90-4A83-416A-BCF3-EA024846079E.jpeg

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Have suggested that our Jr. program manager check our fleet.  Thanks for the heads-up.

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Looks like the original hole was too small and the through hull fitting is forced in causing cracking over a period of time.

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We've seen these quite a bit on plastic hulls, usually around the corner radius of the daggerboard case.

They extend about an inch or two and stop.
I *think* it had something to do with how the parts are fitted as the boat cools, and you get extra stress.
It's been a while since I've been to the factory in England where the Fevas are made.

In our experience, it's a cosmetic issue, and nothing more than that - sort of like spider cracks in gelcoat.
Superficial and nothing more than that.

@RSsailingNA might be able to get some technical feedback from the RS support team, I'm not a technical guy.

TLDR: I've never seen these turn into any real issue, and they are cosmetic in my experience.

 

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This is the bottom of the hull correct? Isn't that just a fracture from the fitting inset getting caught on a object/ramp? Can imagine that impact would put some force into the boat.

Looks like a great time for a heat gun and putty knife. Five minutes and she's good to go.
Bulletproof - Plexus MA310 outta do it.

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Yes it’s the bottom of the hull. It’s the drain hole. I have no problems if it’s cosmetic.

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43 minutes ago, Pung boy said:

I have contacted RS so will be interesting to see if they have a repair method.

Probably  Plexus MA310 or G/flex.

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Looks cosmetic to me as well.  Seen this on plastic boats a decent amount.

And yes, West Systems G/Flex is now REALLY GREAT on polyethylene boats.

 

 

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24 minutes ago, BlatantEcho said:

Looks cosmetic to me as well.  Seen this on plastic boats a decent amount.

And yes, West Systems G/Flex is now REALLY GREAT on polyethylene boats.

 

 

Been there and done that on the kid's boat many years ago.  Still going strong; now sailed by the neighbor's kids.  This ain't a structural issue.

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Sorry to hear about the cracks in your hulls. I have seen this before and it's no reason to be concerned. It definitely should not spread or leak. 

You can fill the hole with West Systems G-Flex 655 by sanding it down a tiny bit to get rid of any roughness, carefully flashing the area with some flame, and then applying the G-Flex.

Prior to doing this repair I would ask that you consult your dealer who can contact the RS Technical Team directly.

 

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Thank you for replying, what does flashing’ mean. I do not have a heat gun, or any heat equipment.

 

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West: "For best results, sand the surfaces after bevelling and rounding and then pass a propane torch across them – you will almost ‘dust’ the surface with the propane touch with the flame – just touching the area you want to bond. The torch oxidises the surface and improves adhesion. Care must be taken when employing this method of surface preparation. To create optimum strength you should then bond to the treated surface within 30 minutes, using G/flex epoxy."

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