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O'Murchadha

Where to move?

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This is my first post.  Be gentle.

My dream is to retire youngish and cruise the world.  I have a frankly obscene amount to learn before I can do that.  I live in Ohio.  I don't sail.

I'm taking my first few ASA's next month and, assuming I love it and don't suck, I really do want to start making a plan.

Here's my question:  My youngest graduates from high school in May 2022, and he will NOT be staying in Ohio (he's made this clear).  With my job, I can live pretty much anywhere I want.  At this point I will be three to four years away from retirement.  So where should I move to get to work on my dream?

I'd be looking for a place with a local school that offers all the training, as well as - probably more importantly - a supportive community where I can continue to learn and find opportunities to sail before I own a boat.  I am not rich.  I wouldn't see the point moving somewhere with a very short season.  Other than that everything is on the table.

Any thoughts very much appreciated.  Thanks, anarchists. 

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1 minute ago, O'Murchadha said:

This is my first post.  Be gentle.

My dream is to retire youngish and cruise the world.  I have a frankly obscene amount to learn before I can do that.  I live in Ohio.  I don't sail.

I'm taking my first few ASA's next month and, assuming I love it and don't suck, I really do want to start making a plan.

Here's my question:  My youngest graduates from high school in May 2022, and he will NOT be staying in Ohio (he's made this clear).  With my job, I can live pretty much anywhere I want.  At this point I will be three to four years away from retirement.  So where should I move to get to work on my dream?

I'd be looking for a place with a local school that offers all the training, as well as - probably more importantly - a supportive community where I can continue to learn and find opportunities to sail before I own a boat.  I am not rich.  I wouldn't see the point moving somewhere with a very short season.  Other than that everything is on the table.

Any thoughts very much appreciated.  Thanks, anarchists. 

Maybe find a place with a sailing club that has timeshare boats. You can try out a bunch. SF Bay has that, but I wouldn't recommend it a place where you can save a few $s. 

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26 minutes ago, O'Murchadha said:

I'd be looking for a place with a local school that offers all the training, as well as - probably more importantly - a supportive community where I can continue to learn and find opportunities to sail before I own a boat.  I am not rich.  I wouldn't see the point moving somewhere with a very short season.  Other than that everything is on the table.

Can you nail it down to a coast (or the Great Lakes)? There are a lot of options. I’m on the east coast so I would say you could probably meet those needs in Newport, Annapolis, Charleston, and several places in New York, Massachusetts, Maine, or Florida. Higher cost of living than Ohio, less than the west coast. 

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1 minute ago, Alaris said:

Can you nail it down to a coast (or the Great Lakes)? There are a lot of options. 

I've lived all around the Great Lakes and, beautiful as they are, I'm ready for salt water again.  I grew up in NoCal, but no real coastal preference.  I don't know the Carolinas too well but they seem affordable and one can sail most of the year?

Florida scares me.  I'm not talking shit about Florida.  I'm just saying it scares me.

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I mean, people from Florida talk shit about Florida. You’re probably fine. I edited my post above to add some more options as well. 

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23 minutes ago, O'Murchadha said:

I am not rich

Somewhere in southern Maryland but within reasonable driving distance to Annapolis MD?

- longish sailing season

- tons of opportunity to sail on other people's boats in casual racing

- mild climate

- lots closer to OH if you have relatives/friends you want to visit (~8 hr drive)

- sort of the center of East coast sailing

I'd say a basic sailing course is important but don't be spending lots of money on courses. What you need is experience first

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28 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Somewhere in southern Maryland but within reasonable driving distance to Annapolis MD?

- longish sailing season

- tons of opportunity to sail on other people's boats in casual racing

- mild climate

- lots closer to OH if you have relatives/friends you want to visit (~8 hr drive)

- sort of the center of East coast sailing

I'd say a basic sailing course is important but don't be spending lots of money on courses. What you need is experience first

Can I ask where in Canada you are and if you'd recommend it?  I sailed with a guy out of Sydney for a day and my impression was that the island is affordable, friendly, temperate, and god damn beautiful.  My oldest goes to university in Montreal which I sort of consider god's perfect city except that it gets stupid cold.

Also, not that you asked, but top 3:

3. Shipbuilding

2. Red Shoes

1. Allison

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It don't matter, live on the boat!  What you need is great publicist to a) create your social media presence and b) start you a GoFundMeCuzIDeserveItAccount and have keyboard bound surfers pay for your adventure mate!

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Check out Charleston, SC. Cost of living is reasonable if you don't live in town and there is a good sailing community there. Probably some sailing schools as well.  Also, the airport can get you to most places you want.

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I considered the "We're a young couple who spend 30 hours / week at the gym, left our jobs and cashed out our trust funds in order to buy a boat and sail around the world" route.  The trouble is I'm lacking wealth, youth, a beach body, a boat, an appealing personality, a functioning understanding of youtube, and unearned confidence.

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You definitely won’t have room for your Peloton on the boat

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If it was me, I'd move to the environs of Annapolis.

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What is it about FL that scares you?  Lived there 8 years after college including three as a liveaboard (NE FL/JAX) and liked it very much.  Granted it was more than a bit ago that I lived there but found the cost of living very similar to the Midwest/Mich where I came from and thought it was pretty nice to be able to sail on Xmas day.  Tampa Bay area perhaps given your requirements?  A nice way to build experience is to sail on other people's boats.  Local club racing can be a good way to do this (Covid situation not withstanding which of course has changed all our lives in many ways). Lots of good choices mentioned here already.  As long as you are on the water and moving towards your goal(s) it will have a positive outcome.  Good luck and keep us posted.

 

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4 hours ago, O'Murchadha said:

I've lived all around the Great Lakes and, beautiful as they are, I'm ready for salt water again.  I grew up in NoCal, but no real coastal preference.  I don't know the Carolinas too well but they seem affordable and one can sail most of the year?

Florida scares me.  I'm not talking shit about Florida.  I'm just saying it scares me.

see the general forum , why not to live in florida

Also get a copy of Octobers "ALL AT SEA, Caribbean excellent article by Cap'n Fatty Goodlander "offshore sailing COVID-19 Style, of where you can sail and what to expect,  

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

If it was me, I'd move to the environs of Annapolis.

I was looking at Annapolis real estate on line today. As a Californian considering taking flight and cash from the the northern part of golden state - it seems inexpensive.  I am also thinking of a decent 2/2 condo in San Diego too.  I need some quality of life luxuries, close enough to an urban center for travel, great sailing culture and still want to keep a 30 foot old racer/cruiser. 

What are the slip fees like in Annapolis? 

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Somewhere on the east coast is good because there are multiple coastal voyages you can do to get experience in a wide array of conditions and circumstances.  There's harbors of a wide array of types pretty much from Canada to the Caribbean.  The west coast is pretty bare for harbors.  Puget sound and the Pacific NW looks awesome, but from there southward.. next stop SF, is a long ass way.

Tons of places to get learning experience on the Chesapeake, in relatively sheltered environs, then branch out north and south to a good spread of interesting spots.  

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Both north and south of Charleston SC there are outright deals on great Real Estate.   Charleston itself is going up in cost and availability is very low.  Do not believe what you see on Zillow.  Most of those properties are waiting on closing. (45 to 60 Days).        

Charleston might work for you in that your kids would love it. There are many job opportunities.  Fairly easy to get people to visit and want to move there.  The downside is cost of boat slips is high. (IMHO).  Ramp launch may require more effort than you like.  IMHO $350k is minimum for a house.   150K minimum for condo With S200 month HOA. 

I like Wilmington NC, Outer Banks, Beaufort SC and NC.  However this advice is really tough to give because we have no idea what you do and what your budget is.  On top of that there are several issues that seem common. 

1. Couples - One can get a job but the other is VERY frustrated ( Usually the smaller towns on the coast)

2. My Health Insurance is not exactly transferable. 

3.  "Back in East YAYA we did it this way".  Gonna be different. 

4.  Thinking the grown kids are all going to visit - Especially on Christmas!!!  I have seen 8 room cut up to all parts of new build houses because the Mrs. had the idea of all these future grandkids coming.   If you have any ideas of family and friends following you then it is more likely nearer the bigger the Cities.  

5. Boating is going to be cheaper in the country than the city.   

Check out Outer Banks Sailing.   Also those who prep for JWorld have really impressed me.  One week really works if you study before you go.  

Boats - Check out a Cape Dory Typhoon with a simple outboard on the back and keep it at a dock.    It has a keel and you should be able to sail it by yourself or a friend.  Slightly bigger a Catalina 22 might work.   Keep it very simple and learn before you take family and friends out.   Marriages, Friendships and family do not always enjoy being on the boat while you have your initial frustration.   

 

Good luck

 

 

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Def dont consider the Grove. Its awful here.

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6 hours ago, O'Murchadha said:

Can I ask where in Canada you are and if you'd recommend it?  I sailed with a guy out of Sydney for a day and my impression was that the island is affordable, friendly, temperate, and god damn beautiful.  My oldest goes to university in Montreal which I sort of consider god's perfect city except that it gets stupid cold.

Vancouver - but unless you have Canadian parents you would be unlikely to be able to immigrate. You could visit for up to 6 months/year though.

I wouldn't want to live aboard in winter in Vancouver. Not too cold but very rainy and humid. People do of course, but you've got to like grey skies. The amount of rain isn't huge overall but the number of days with rain is high (like 20/30 in December). 

Summer is lovely. Spring and fall are OK depending on the weather. Winter is too wet. You can't afford to live in Vancouver but Vancouver Island communities are much more affordable.

 

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Posted (edited)
32 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Vancouver - but unless you have Canadian parents you would be unlikely to be able to immigrate. You could visit for up to 6 months/year though.

I wouldn't want to live aboard in winter in Vancouver. Not too cold but very rainy and humid. People do of course, but you've got to like grey skies. The amount of rain isn't huge overall but the number of days with rain is high (like 20/30 in December). 

Summer is lovely. Spring and fall are OK depending on the weather. Winter is too wet. You can't afford to live in Vancouver but Vancouver Island communities are much more affordable.

 

He's not lying, although there are other ways to immigrate.  We moved to Kitsilano from Winnipeg about 2 years ago. Great area but the rain/grey is legit. It's not even exciting rain, just a long mist that can go for weeks on end. When it's nice, it's spectacular. For this Californian and my Prairie Girl it's just not often enough and too depressing. Have since relocated to Kelowna BC. Hoping for more sun, some Santana 525 one design racing (22 boats) and long term retirement. We will always have a Canadian headquarters and I'm hoping for good things there. (When the border opens to me of course). 

The island is cool. Sister in law lives there, Qualicum Beach. Super nice. But you can get bushed. They have it all on the island so you never get motivated to leave.  The ferry deal sucks. 

To the OP: I'm biased, but the I think the best value in yachting/learning to sail/outfitting/acquiring a boat and a jumping off point is San Diego. It's expensive, but it's year round. Loads of programs to learn from very expensive to super cheap. You'll learn more, faster, have more support, good selection of yachts, a forgiving area to learn. You can sail every weekend year round literally. Learn, race, buy, outfit, and take off with the Ha-Ha. People do it all the time. 

There's a reason teams train here. No wasted time. Can't buy time. Check it out. GO PADRES.

Edited by no shoes
add GO PADRES
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This is all very helpful and very much appreciated.  For internet people you're all really kind.  

Charleston I'd thought about and will take a harder look at.  San Diego I hadn't considered because of money but will take a look at. I'm not surprised Canada doesn't want us.  We're filthy animals with terrible judgement.  BC did get under my skin though.

I'm taking a week of classes out of Santa Cruz in November, so we'll see about that.  Growing up my grandparents lived in Salinas and we always went to Monterey when we visited.  All I ever wanted to do was stare at the boats at Fisherman's Wharf and watch them coming and going, which I suppose is where it all began.  I hadn't considered the question of harbors on the west coast at all, though.

Florida still scares me.  Bath salts and alligators. ;)

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Well, wherever you end up,  if you want to actually become a good sailor, get a dinghy, spend as much time in it as possible.  When you aren't sailing in that boat,  get out on other people's boats - beer can racing would be a good start,  lots of opportunities,  even if you just stand on the end of the dock with a 6-pack in hand (this works well in Santa Cruz) you'll get a ride. As mentioned above,  dont spend a lot of money on schools. Then, bareboat charter.  Build your resume. Own small, rent big as Tom Schock will tell you. The sailing world will open up for some amazing adventures. 

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Learning to sail - YOUTUBE!!!

I really think that Youtube will put Sailing Schools and many home construction trades out of business.   Whether your learning to sail or installing a shower Youtube videos are great!  Get an account and set up categories.  Whenever you find a video you like save it to a category.    Come back later for a playback of your favorite Ramp launch failures, Docking 101,  Bottom Paint for dummies and Charleston Race Week 2012 hosted by Mr Clean!!

Mr. Clean was the premier on the water sailing host and rap star in the Charleston market for several years......LL MC....peace out.... 

 

https://www.norbanks.com

 

Have fun! 

 

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7 hours ago, Black Jack said:

What are the slip fees like in Annapolis? 

A few data points from marinas that post their prices online:

Mears $7k

Yacht Basin $5k (35’ slip)

Eastport Yacht Center $5k

Other than that, I’ve heard numbers from $3,500 to 5k but don’t recall the exact names. There are a lot of options though so I’d be surprised if many stray far from this range. 

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15 hours ago, O'Murchadha said:

 

Also, not that you asked, but top 3:

3. Shipbuilding

2. Red Shoes

1. Allison

Golf clap.

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3 hours ago, Alaris said:

A few data points from marinas that post their prices online:

Mears $7k

Yacht Basin $5k (35’ slip)

Eastport Yacht Center $5k

Other than that, I’ve heard numbers from $3,500 to 5k but don’t recall the exact names. There are a lot of options though so I’d be surprised if many stray far from this range. 

It's a bit cheaper away from Annapolis.    A few years ago when I was slip hunting for my 32'' boat, I was getting quotes around $2800 for the West River / Rhode River area.

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It's ok to be scared of Florida but it is a nice place to visit. We have some friends who live in the Tampa area and we went to visit them over spring break a few years back. The whole way there my wife was asking about the potential of moving there someday. On our last day at around 9am, I'm loading the car and come back into the house dripping with sweat. Once she realized that it was 90 degrees with 100% humidity in early April, she was much less interested. 

There is a good reason that many of the houses have backyard pools with bug screen enclosures too.  

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7 hours ago, Latadjust said:

Well, wherever you end up,  if you want to actually become a good sailor, get a dinghy, spend as much time in it as possible.  

This is really solid advice.  If you want to learn how to make a boat go, there is nothing better than a dinghy to figure it out.  They connect you to the wind and water with an immediacy that is lost with bigger boats.  And you can do that right now.

I have a friend that moved from California for just the reason you are. Never sailed. He bought a little 23 footer for chips and was very slowly getting a feel for it.  I suggested he sail a Sunfish with our group for casual racing.  He struggled mightily the first day out in our shifty creek.  Just couldn't make it go where he wanted.  Ended up parking it, but kept his chin up, shot the shit with us after over a few beers and kept at it.  He and I ended up doing a lot of after work jaunts out to the river in progressively bigger winds.  Fast forward a year and his progress is phenomenal!  He won his first race a couple of weeks ago.  He probably sails as much or more than anyone in our area.

There will be plenty more to learn about seamanship, cruising, navigation and all that shit, but if you want to learn to make the boat go, a dinghy is the answer.

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32 minutes ago, efrank said:

This is really solid advice.  If you want to learn how to make a boat go, there is nothing better than a dinghy to figure it out.  They connect you to the wind and water with an immediacy that is lost with bigger boats.  And you can do that right now.

I have a friend that moved from California for just the reason you are. Never sailed. He bought a little 23 footer for chips and was very slowly getting a feel for it.  I suggested he sail a Sunfish with our group for casual racing.  He struggled mightily the first day out in our shifty creek.  Just couldn't make it go where he wanted.  Ended up parking it, but kept his chin up, shot the shit with us after over a few beers and kept at it.  He and I ended up doing a lot of after work jaunts out to the river in progressively bigger winds.  Fast forward a year and his progress is phenomenal!  He won his first race a couple of weeks ago.  He probably sails as much or more than anyone in our area.

There will be plenty more to learn about seamanship, cruising, navigation and all that shit, but if you want to learn to make the boat go, a dinghy is the answer.

Superb advice.  

If you are uncomfortable sailing a Dinghy in Salt Water - Sharks,  Aligators (yes the damn things love the beach) and Jet Skies (Salt Water Variety is VICIOUS!)   A one week vacation to Adirondacks or Finger Lakes would do the trick.  Look for lodge, hotel or Marina that rents sailboats.  If it is a Sunfish or similar boat you are going swimming so great waterproof sunscreen, Shorty Wet Suit is June or September (Maybe) and a normal foam sailing vest lifejacket..   

I absolutely agree about new people to sailing jumping into these large boats (25 ft and up) attempting to sail to some far off Island.  Huge mistake.   The example above shows a guy who spent very little cash and could spend lots of time learning to sail.  

 

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While California housing and other expenses can be steep, I think SoCal offers a lot for those of us who need the ocean and sailing for life to make sense (even a little bit). NorCal is great too (grew up in S.F.) but doesn't offer as many easily achievable sailing destinations or as much warm weather.

From Ventura south are a lot of places to live at or near harbors that, with some creative shopping, offer housing that won't break the bank. May have to drive some to get to your harbor of choice but with a boat that can serve as a weekend condo near a yacht club it's not all that bad.

The big benefit is that a multitude of harbors are within a day or overnight sail, all eight of the Channel Islands are easily reachable within a day or two sail and offer a lot of activities and for bigger trips Mexico is not that far away. Of course the big leap to Hawaii and beyond is always a possibility too.

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Why I would not choose SoCal for this: very expensive slip rates, never any big breeze (or breeze at all), not very many cruising destinations (Catalina & other Islands get boring after a few years) housing expensive. Most trips out to any of the islands means fighting to get upwind to the island (either no light breeze or heaps). Ventura/Hueneme at least have breeze & a reach both ways to the Channel Islands.

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3 hours ago, longy said:

Why I would not choose SoCal for this: very expensive slip rates, never any big breeze (or breeze at all), not very many cruising destinations (Catalina & other Islands get boring after a few years) housing expensive hard to find.

FIFY

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Though I have never lived there I think that N Fla, both coasts, has affordable sailing. East coast would make for easy Bahamas training before going further. Downside is hurricane exposure and the summers. And the Floridians.

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On 10/3/2020 at 8:21 AM, slap said:

It's a bit cheaper away from Annapolis.    A few years ago when I was slip hunting for my 32'' boat, I was getting quotes around $2800 for the West River / Rhode River area.

We have a condo (2 bed/bath) and a 40’ slip on Back Creek across from Jabin’s 

rent condo for $1700 slip $300. Would sell for $350k 

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Forgot to mention HOA fees are $2500. Oh, then there is that "one time" assessment to fix the roof damaged from that big NE'er that blew through, and... let's not even talk taxes.

 

In other words, buy an ad. Ed will appreciate it. B)

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Here in eastern North Carolina we can sail just about year-round, and cost of living is low. Oriental, New Bern, Washington NC - all good sailing, with a small-town feel. I guess one important question is whether you can apply your career skills here.

I grew up sailing the lower half of the Chesapeake, and I can say for certain that there are many more sailing days from October through April down here.  The proximity of the Gulf Stream to this area provides for a warmer climate. 

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14 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Here in eastern North Carolina we can sail just about year-round, and cost of living is low. Oriental, New Bern, Washington NC - all good sailing, with a small-town feel. I guess one important question is whether you can apply your career skills here.

I grew up sailing the lower half of the Chesapeake, and I can say for certain that there are many more sailing days from October through April down here.  The proximity of the Gulf Stream to this area provides for a warmer climate. 

Seems I should definitely take a look at the Carolinas.  With my job and I can live anywhere that's reasonably close to an airport and has wi-fi.  I was doing everything on Zoom before it was cool.

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18 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Here in eastern North Carolina we can sail just about year-round, and cost of living is low. Oriental, New Bern, Washington NC - all good sailing, with a small-town feel. I guess one important question is whether you can apply your career skills here.

I grew up sailing the lower half of the Chesapeake, and I can say for certain that there are many more sailing days from October through April down here.  The proximity of the Gulf Stream to this area provides for a warmer climate. 

Yup!  I have sailed in many locales around the world, and I have to agree we have it pretty good.  Cheap housing, low taxes, plenty of slips for what seems to be much cheaper than the national average.  Enough state and large private lands surrounding the water that there is only so much growth going to happen.  No significant powerboat congestion/annoyance (except for on the weekends!).

Hanging around the marina as much as I do, a lot of people see this area as a cheap staging area for starting their dreams.  Working boatyards that allow DIY, enough marine services to provide what DIY'ers can't.  Plenty of delivery crew opportunities.  Local schools for prof. certification (down in Oriental).  Generally friendly, welcoming people.

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On 10/2/2020 at 7:55 PM, Varan said:

I hear the Whitehouse wil be vacant so. 

Says the brainiac who’s too dumb to use spellcheck.

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20 hours ago, Red Sky said:

Says the brainiac who’s too dumb to use spellcheck.

Yep

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21 hours ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

Move down under
No guns

no Trump or Biden

Warm weather

Warm Water

great sailing

Place is a 3rd World shit-hole. Stay away at all costs.

FKT

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21 hours ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

Move down under
No guns

no Trump or Biden

Warm weather

Warm Water

great sailing

And everything can kill you

Dont forget the drop bears!

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On 10/4/2020 at 2:37 PM, LionessRacing said:

We have a condo (2 bed/bath) and a 40’ slip on Back Creek across from Jabin’s 

rent condo for $1700 slip $300. Would sell for $350k 

how has the move gone? hows the life? how would you rate the the sailing compared to Alameda/Bay area?

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8 hours ago, Black Jack said:

how has the move gone? hows the life? how would you rate the the sailing compared to Alameda/Bay area?

With three moves in 6 weeks (Conway, SC townhouse --> MB house, CA Storage back to CA townhouse, CA townhouse by U-Haul to MB House) I'm a bit beat and have seen far more moving boxes than I ever want to again, finally developed a color coding system of tape around boxes to denote heavy and fragile to guide packing.  The 2500 + mile drive down I-40 and I22/20 in 4 1/2 days was great weather, with pretty scenery from a bouncing 26' truck cab, not the best way to see the country, but a nice break from the incessant whingeing on the news.

Arrived to find that the SC TV stations are running a lot of adds for/against Lindsay Graham, could do without that.  People here are pleasant, move at a relaxed pace and so far are far more accepting than in Morgan Hill, the neighborhood "Next Door" page is a lot less snarky and not infested with virtue signaling "Karens". Nice to be out of the Bay Area before the inevitable collapse, I see that Gov Gavin is getting sillier by the day....

 I can recommend good and bad movers in CA and so far, only good in SC. Now settling into a 7 bedroom 4 bath house where there's at least two of everything you need to live, and generally more than that from previous bi-coastal living. And that is after giving away a significant quantity of stuff before moving from CA. The Re-modeling/honey do list is growing, but at least the Festools are finally here and brother in law dropped off a Table saw that he's not using. My office/studio is on third floor, wife's office on first, can't hear each other during conference calls, (she's a bit hard of hearing and volume increases with frustration) though she can hear when I practice electronic drums, so I need to build a sound deadening riser to damp out the thumping from the kick pedal.

Sailing is still at least a month off, one of the remodeling items is having "Hank" Hinckley give Lioness some love at his shop before we splash her. Lioness is supposed to be getting trucked out this week, had to write a "Do you know where my boat is?" email as have not heard in a few weeks if they are on schedule. Insurance here is higher, even with Lioness being too old to have "wind coverage". Most of the sailing will be in "Long Bay" out of Little River, SC on the NC border, already scoping out Charleston Race Week for spring. Wilmington is 30 miles North. I suspect this will be less sporty as in no afternoon thermal howling through the Gate, but will be more convenient, boat's about 20 min by car and then 4 miles to the ocean, so that's an hour closer than in CA, won't have the Estuary sailing, though if the wind's right can reach up/down the ICW, with the powerboaters.

Closing on the MB slip (Lightkeepers)  Friday, and wife's thinking she wants a boat to cruise the ICW that can be loaded with sisters (2/4 live here too) kids, nieces, gkids etc. So researching pontoon boats as we have a trailer storage area and ICW boat ramp at housing development, may have to retrieve the AWD Ford Escape from Virginia or pick up a beater 4WD truck to manage the steep tidal (slick at low tide) ramp. Very Little to complain about that is not self-induced, counting blessings and Pizza cutters and making Goodwill runs as we find more.

Annapolis condo/slip may end up liquidated as we didn't hang on to build sufficient equity to pay off from CA sale, prices of town houses were not tracking the curve to do it, at $5k/month it made no sense to continue to hold it, and I've done the rental property three time zones away bit, not looking to be exposed to that with CA property law with retirement on the horizon. 

All in all a positive experience 

 

 

 

 

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On 10/3/2020 at 12:30 PM, longy said:

Why I would not choose SoCal for this: very expensive slip rates, never any big breeze (or breeze at all)...

I guess you've never been to Cabrillo Beach (aka Hurricane Gulch).

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6 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

All in all a positive experience 

 

Good to hear things are going well.

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i sailed all my life from dinghies to hobie cats, to windsurfers, to kiting, to small cabin boats, and finally last year to a pacific seacraft crealock 34 in Panama for planned ocean sailing. so a very different history from you. BUT, i chose to live somewhere cheap in the midwest, east central Illinois, to save money, and we have a little local lake with a very friendly little sailing club offering cheap lessons, shared club dinghies, lots of small cabin boat racing, and group trips to BVIs each spring for a taste of salt water sailing. I have watched people go from zero to owning their own saltwater boats in a matter of a few years here. So why not explore local opportunities in Ohio first?

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Pensacola, Florida......some of the best sailing anywhere all year round. Many yacht clubs with racing....affordable cost of living..plenty of world racers and cruisers to learn from. 

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1 hour ago, Woods Rider said:

Pensacola, Florida......some of the best sailing anywhere all year round. Many yacht clubs with racing....affordable cost of living..plenty of world racers and cruisers to learn from. 

How many Hurricanes do you have scheduled for next season? 

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

Good to hear things are going well.

Well, the crane operator at the boat yard in Alameda is "sick" so the masts are not removed, so the haul is delayed, so the truck is delayed....  

otherwise life is good

 

 

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2 hours ago, Kent H said:

How many Hurricanes do you have scheduled for next season? 

Meow.

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18 minutes ago, Bull City said:
2 hours ago, Kent H said:

How many Hurricanes do you have scheduled for next season? 

Meow.

Oune of funnieste wayes I heared of caulleng somoune a pussey!                                                :)

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2 hours ago, LionessRacing said:
5 hours ago, Bull City said:

Good to hear things are going well.

Well, the crane operator at the boat yard in Alameda is "sick" so the masts are not removed, so the haul is delayed, so the truck is delayed....  

otherwise life is good

As thaye saye  in localle termes "fuck that guye"' gette sombodey ealse...........            :)

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10 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

As thaye saye  in localle termes "fuck that guye"' gette sombodey ealse...........            :)

If it were only that simple in California.... 

 

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16 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

Well, the crane operator at the boat yard in Alameda is "sick" so the masts are not removed, so the haul is delayed, so the truck is delayed....  

otherwise life is good

Welcome to Dixie!

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23 hours ago, TheDragon said:

i sailed all my life from dinghies to hobie cats, to windsurfers, to kiting, to small cabin boats, and finally last year to a pacific seacraft crealock 34 in Panama for planned ocean sailing. so a very different history from you. BUT, i chose to live somewhere cheap in the midwest, east central Illinois, to save money, and we have a little local lake with a very friendly little sailing club offering cheap lessons, shared club dinghies, lots of small cabin boat racing, and group trips to BVIs each spring for a taste of salt water sailing. I have watched people go from zero to owning their own saltwater boats in a matter of a few years here. So why not explore local opportunities in Ohio first?

There is a little sailing school on a lake nearby me, but they haven't been in operation (as far as I can tell) since COVID times.  I think they train on a 28' boat, but given the response here I intend to call and ask about dinghies in the Spring.

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21 hours ago, Bull City said:

Welcome to Dixie!

That's on the Alameda side....

My experiences so far in Dixie are that time is a sort of elastic "manana/Island time" concept, and that some folks are prompt, a few run early, and many run late, but they do get there, and being in a hurry is not a useful attitude. 

Had a Refrigerator repair tech show at 8 pm, and he had two more stops... 

 

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1 hour ago, LionessRacing said:

That's on the Alameda side....

My experiences so far in Dixie are that time is a sort of elastic "manana/Island time" concept, and that some folks are prompt, a few run early, and many run late, but they do get there, and being in a hurry is not a useful attitude. 

Had a Refrigerator repair tech show at 8 pm, and he had two more stops... 

 

Just closed on a Townhouse in Charleston.   I do not think the media is accurately covering the massive movements to this area and work being done on existing homes.  I got into two bidding wars and opted out of that mess.  I am on James Island one of the locations in Charleston that I would want to live.  However the property is definitely not what I intended to buy.   Instead I will likely fix it up with Apartment features and rent it out.   Rents are going through the roof in the nicer areas.   After Covid 19 I will then rent this place out and move into something more to what I want.   I have one Contractor who is now booked through next summer.   Dock Contractor, Electrician, to beginning of summer.   I am really not surprised by the Refrigerator guy working until he drops.  Gotta work while the work is here.  

All that said I was at Folly Beach park in the morning and it is heaven.   There is a James Island Grocery store that is Heaven X10.... If they build Condos on top of it I will move there.   Every single service, Contractor, Insurance and tip my Realtor recommended worked fantastic.   My stuff was either bad or in one case a near lawsuit.   Charleston is a bit different and the locals know how to make things work.   

Big Props to 

Paul Quigley - Century 21 - https://www.century21.com/real-estate-agent/profile/paul-j-quigley-P25374053

Butler and College LLC - https://www.bandclawfirm.com

 

I strongly recommend the Charleston area but PLEASE if you are from out of town go with these ^^^ people.   From serious construction flaws and his contacts Paul saved me several times.  Butler and College dealt with a very serious problem that my Lender created.   

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Congrats!  Call Kurt at high and dry boatworks if you want a line on a boat or need any repairs or painting.  Call me or get in touch with RobbieB if you need local knowledge.

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3 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

being in a hurry is not a useful attitude. 

Very true.

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1 hour ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Congrats!  Call Kurt at high and dry boatworks if you want a line on a boat or need any repairs or painting.  Call me or get in touch with RobbieB if you need local knowledge.

Thanks, I will do that. 

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+1 for everyone recommending getting a dinghy. To go cruising, especially longer-distance, you need to know how to operate the boat, navigate, park, maintain the engine/electrics etc, but you also need to know how to sail. Pretty much the only way to learn to sail well is in a dinghy, but the great thing is that it's a lot cheaper and more convenient than anything with a keel/cabin. Start with a scruffy old Laser/Sunfish/whatever, it doesn't need to be shiny, and just go sailing. Do some club racing if you can. By all means get your first big boat at the same time and start building experience with all the other stuff, but get a dinghy.

At some point when you're cruising you're going to find yourself in a situation you didn't plan for. Big breeze off a lee shore with a rope round your prop; engine won't start and you need to pick up your mooring (which is behind all the other moorings) or get onto a dock under sail; middle of nowhere, it's blowing 50 knots and the main halyard's jammed. Whatever it is, you'll be very glad indeed that you learned to sail in a dinghy.

When I started sailing big boats, you could immediately tell the dinghy sailors. They were the ones you wanted trimming and helming in races, and they were absolutely the people you wanted on the wheel/tiller if things got a bit hairy. It was perfectly normal for dinghy-sailing kids in their early 20s to step onto an offshore race boat with little or no previous big boat experience, and be able to drive it better than anyone else on board almost immediately. To begin with they'd probably be a liability if you let them out of the cockpit, but they knew how to make the boat go, and how to keep it upright.

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On 10/2/2020 at 11:21 AM, O'Murchadha said:

This is my first post.  Be gentle.

My dream is to retire youngish and cruise the world.  I have a frankly obscene amount to learn before I can do that.  I live in Ohio.  I don't sail.

I'm taking my first few ASA's next month and, assuming I love it and don't suck, I really do want to start making a plan.

Here's my question:  My youngest graduates from high school in May 2022, and he will NOT be staying in Ohio (he's made this clear).  With my job, I can live pretty much anywhere I want.  At this point I will be three to four years away from retirement.  So where should I move to get to work on my dream?

I'd be looking for a place with a local school that offers all the training, as well as - probably more importantly - a supportive community where I can continue to learn and find opportunities to sail before I own a boat.  I am not rich.  I wouldn't see the point moving somewhere with a very short season.  Other than that everything is on the table.

Any thoughts very much appreciated.  Thanks, anarchists. 

Go someplace you can sail year round that has a Laser fleet ( Doesn’t need to be warm, just sailable. ) Buy a Laser.  Race (If COVID LETS YOU)  and train on it at least 3-4 times a week for 4 years.  Crew on other people’s bigger boats (COVID ALERT THERE TOO).  Take sailing classes/ courses. Read books.  Save Money.  Drool over boats and reviews on the web.  When COVID lifts, go to boat shows.  Fun!

edit- didn’t see Dave D’s post, but +10!  We agree.

edit edit. And then buy a Wyliecat or Nonesuch and don’t screw around with jibs.  Don’t buy a boat with a lot of systems.

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^ Very well said, Dave S.  And if people are too fat or old for a laser/sunfish/whatever, something like a Flying Scot is a decent option for learning to feel and understand the dynamic forces that make a sailboat do the things it does.

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11 hours ago, Amati said:

 

edit edit. And then buy a Wyliecat or Nonesuch and don’t screw around with jibs.  Don’t buy a boat with a lot of systems.

Whoa, whoa, whoa, hold on, I was with you 100% up until this point. 

Learning to sail a boat with a jib is a crucial skill. Have you ever sent a small pond boat across the canal and run around to the other side and caught it? You have to balance the main and jib to give neutral helm in order for the boat to sail straight. In big boats that is a critical skill as well. 

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Check out Seattle/Puget Sound. Housing not cheap, but doable outside main cities. Year round racing. Best sailing Oct-June. Summer can sail 5 days a week. Seattle sailing club reasonable for boat rental. Yes it rains, put on a jacket and deal. 

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3 hours ago, MikeR80 said:

Hows the breeze in Seattle in the summer?

Decent afternoon/evening thermal, 8-15kts fairly common. 

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Seattle is at 47N, which is about the same latitude as the top of Maine. You get very long summer days but correspondingly short winter days. Winter air temperatures rarely touch freezing, so the short days limit how much you can realistically do in the winter.

If you like to explore lush green mountains then Seattle is the place to be. If you want a light wind sailing venue, it seems like San Diego would be a more pleasant place to live at a similar cost. 

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Seattle (Salish Sea) offers vastly more sailing destinations than San Diego. Just for an overnight sail 6 hours from Seattle I have a choice of over a dozen rural bays behind different islands and peninsulas.  San Diego would be better if you want to get out to the ocean quickly, but doesn’t offer the same rich set of destinations.

At retirement I’d probably pick Anacortes over Seattle.  2 hour sail to the heart of the San Juan Islands, a nice small town with lots to walk to from the main marinas, and a lot of sailing culture. 

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2 hours ago, Alex W said:

Seattle (Salish Sea) offers vastly more sailing destinations than San Diego. Just for an overnight sail 6 hours from Seattle I have a choice of over a dozen rural bays behind different islands and peninsulas.  San Diego would be better if you want to get out to the ocean quickly, but doesn’t offer the same rich set of destinations.

At retirement I’d probably pick Anacortes over Seattle.  2 hour sail to the heart of the San Juan Islands, a nice small town with lots to walk to from the main marinas, and a lot of sailing culture. 

And a dinghy dock!

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2 minutes ago, Amati said:

And a dinghy dock!

With cleats!

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Another vote for North Carolina! We currently live in Raleigh, NC (part of the 'research triangle' area - home to NC State, Duke and UNC Chapel Hill). Great job opportunities here.

We started our sailing journey in Oriental, NC 5 years ago - great place to learn to sail - referred to as the Sailing Capital of North Carolina, only a 2.5 hour drive from Raleigh. Not a great place to live full time as a young person, more of a retirement community, but it was great place for us to spend our weekends learning to sail. The Neuse River has year-round sailing, steady winds, protected from ocean swells by the outer banks, and great locations to cruise to (New Bern, Ocracoke Island, Beaufort, NC, Washington, NC, etc.). Great sailing club to look up is the neusesailingassociation.org

We recently moved our boat to Wrightsville Beach, NC. The big boat sailing community here isn't nearly as strong as it is in Oriental, but there is a strong junior sailing program (sunfish, laser, etc.) and the Wilmington area is a legitimate city with lots to do with our now two young kids (3 and 1 year old). We are considering relocating to Wilmington from Raleigh so we can be closer to the boat for more sailing time.

Shoot me a message if you want to chat, happy to talk about the NC area in detail.

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