bmiller

Firewood

Recommended Posts

For those of us in cooler climates.

Do you?

Harvest, haul, bunk, split, stack

Call for a load of logs then cut and split

Order cut split 

Have a guy deliver seasoned cut split and stack it for you

I just ordered 3 cords of 16' logs. Gave the guy directions exactly where to drop it. He missed by a bit and put it on the neighbors side far away from my cutting stacking spot. So I get to move them twice, sigh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just pay the Man. comes split dry and ready to burn.

Just order early in the season to beat the rush and if it's not quite dry, I have time to sort that out.

The man has the right gear, the time you spend splitting it with an axe is just not worth the savings in my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do notte heate withe woode butte do enjoine the fire/flammes.

I halve fire pitte oute backe butte manney times juste go withe it aftere a barbeque.  Harde / softe woode it dossente realley mattere............                :)

 

scrappes / chippes frome the woode shoppe our excellantte fire starteres..............               :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

B13CD550-6341-4F00-A070-A8B84431CB3D.thumb.jpeg.bff0a683a7ee82abc89f9925aa907fe6.jpeg

We burn about two and a half cords each winter. I buy split wood from our arborist. It seasons in a pile for a year then goes into the wood shed in early summer. Nothing wrong with cutting and splitting yourself but there’s only so much time. I’m convinced that having a fire wards off seasonal mood issues. Our particular wood heater is a Finnish design.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually have it delivered and then I stack it. This year, we dropped 10 trees on the edges of the property and hauled them back. I rented a log splitter. First time ever.

Other than the noise, that thing made short work of 5 cords of wood.

 

I may sell my splitting mall.....  

 

WL

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years ago I went through 10 cords (not face cords) of wood a year. Most of it cut, split and stacked by me. A few years I had to buy a few cords because I was a bit banged up.

White Oak. Hickory. Red Oak. Beech. Hard Maple. Cherry. Occasionally Ash.

I miss the wood stove. I'm thinking about getting a small one for the garage. These water Oaks they have here are for shit, but the Cherry, and Live Oak will be fine stuff....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just don't do like my neighbour. Had a load of unsplit cordwood delivered and dumped 20' from where it was to be stacked. Got a small hydraulic splitter and set it up beside the pile.

As he split each piece he tossed it to his left - the stacking area was to his right. :rolleyes:

Then he got to pick up and carry the whole pile 25' - 30' and stack it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First year with a house and a woodstove - bought dry split wood, guy (and his badass mom) dumped 3 cords in a big pile next to our woodshed, we stacked it.  Will see what we do for next season - hoping to be able to cut at least some of our wood from the property in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a sweet firewood deal. A fella up on Underwood Heights had some acreage with oak trees. He'd clear the small ones when they were 10"inches diameter, split, stack and cover them. I'd buy and then pick up at my leisure. No hurry. This stuff was so well seasoned some newspaper under a stack of three pieces was all you needed to start the fire, no kindling needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We scrounge free wood all year and burn full time in cold winter. We burn 4 to 5 full cords of free wood we split yearly. Got about 8 full cords split this spring by just following the Edison power tree trimmers around the city. One summer when split and its dry enough for us. We have a modern EPA Soap Stone stove  and get about 1 pint of ash yearly when I sweep the chimney liner.

I do cover the pile in winter to keep it dry. This year with a nice new brown tarp 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the gold country foothills of California we use firewood for our primary source of heat in the winter. From clearing for fire safety around the house and property we generate about half of what we need,  cut logs, drag them to the house with a pickup and a chain, cut/split (maul for years, then hydraulic splitter), let it sit out all summer, stack and cover for winter. The balance we order and get delivered,  we stack, good exercise. Most of what we buy is cedar since we have plenty of oak.

There is NOTHING like the heat from a woodstove, especially when the weather outside is frightful. The living room is warm and the bedrooms are cool.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The people who maintain the trees on our property also, not surprisingly, sell firewood.  Every year they drop about a half cord of split mixed hardwood in my driveway. Seasoned at least two years.  I stack it.  I keep wondering how much of my own wood I pay to have cut down and removed and then pay for a 2nd time when it is turned into firewood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grew up on 40 acres of medium density bush land, mostly messmate and ironbark. Limbs and trees that came down in storms were trimmed by chainsaw, usually by mum, then stacked in the truck to be transported to the house. 

My job was to split and stack that wood into size and types, smaller messmate for getting things going and ironbark to bringing the heat. I also did this as a paid job for various elderly neighbours. 

As I got older our financial situation changed a bit and we started to get the occasional delivery of cut and split redgum.

After my mum passed we very rarely did any cutting/clearing ourselves and relied solely on the delivered redgum. About 15 years ago the wood heater was removed to make way for gas central heating.

Much better when you get home from work late and it's dark and raining to simply push that button. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have gas fired central heating, but running from tank gas it's expensive.  So it's supplemented by a stove,  wood from the garden,  of which there is an excess at the moment, as there's are three trees down and huge branches from an oak tree that blew off a couple of weeks ago. 

I have no idea of how much we use,  it's just cut split stacked.. overnight coal is added as it keeps the heating going better.. 

As I'm getting older the wood chopping is much harder work... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy kiln dried and split but only burn a cord year for ambiance.  The other side of the wall was built for a wood/ coal stove. We sold the coal stove, and might put in a wood stove again when the kids are older.  

 

Also I scrounge , cut and split by hand and let season for a year if I can.

20201010_034418.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

neighbor is a retired farmer.

He LOVES to help cut and split firewood. Gets his blood flowing.

This year I had tree service drop a couple100 year old oak trees.

On my weekends we pulled out the big Sthils and cut them up.

After giving the big pieces to a buddy for making bowls, we used his splitter and tossed the pieces into the bucket of his tractor.

That allowed us to dump it in neat piles anywhere we wanted .

 

Make buddies with a farmer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Foreverslow said:

Make buddies with a farmer.

If you're the farmer, make buddies with a mechanic. 

We have been buying wood, and stacking it, but will start cutting this fall. We have the land, trees, tractor. Neighbor has the saws and splitter and youthful strength. And he's a mechanic. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My splitter just went down. I have 3 oaks to get through and I'm not doing it with a maul.

A 24 ton splitter is way faster feeding a 50,000 btu Vermont stove.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

My splitter just went down. I have 3 oaks to get through and I'm not doing it with a maul.

A 24 ton splitter is way faster feeding a 50,000 btu Vermont stove.

I love splitting oak almost as much as I love the smell it emanates as it cooks my food and warms me under the stars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love to have tree length delivered but there's no room on my property for a big truck to turn around. When last I felled some red oaks that were overhanging the house I still enjoyed hand splitting them, but I suspect my hands may beg to differ nowadays.

I get 2 cords of split, green oak delivered early each spring. It gets stacked in one of two drying sheds for use a year and a half later.

enhance

Used to be 2 cords barely got us through  the winter (the woodstove supplements our propane FHA furnace) but the last 2 or 3 winters have been so mild there's been plenty of wood left over to heat the hot tub.

enhance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When my son passed a chimney floating smoke our way, it reminded him of the woods and the camp fire.  Now my grand daughter is learning to develop those senses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, hasher said:

When my son passed a chimney floating smoke our way, it reminded him of the woods and the camp fire.  Now my grand daughter is learning to develop those senses.

My wife has learned to love me getting up early on the weekends.  I get the fireplace going, put some bacon  in the oven and then start making cinnamon rolls by hand.  By the time she and usually the kids wake up the house smells of warm fire fresh bacon and fresh cinnamon rolls. 

 

For me the smell reminds me of holidays at my grandparents. But for my kids it will smell like home.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There aren’t many aromas that are capable of transporting me to another time and place but that sweet yeasty smell of cinnamon rolls or sticky buns is among them. Thanks for the memory jolt.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok...ready for the big question?....Do you store firewood bark side up or down ?   Why? I heard a couple of Norwegian woodsmen almost come to blows arguing over this onetime in a bar....beers were cheap and great entertainment...what say you ?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bark side up.  Only way, and I’ll defend that ‘till my hands can no longer grip a maul...

I grew up in wood-heated homes, and as much as I hated stacking wood as a kid, now I do it willingly.  Funnily, my parents put in gas heat right after I went off to college.... It helps that I have a super-insulated home and only feed a little Vermont Intrepid II.  Down side of super-insulated homes is that we build fires constantly. Get up, light a fire, damp down, go to work.  Get home, light a fire, stoke a bit until bedtime, full charge (depending on temp) then, damp down, go to bed.  Morning there may be coals if lucky but usually not, so build a fire....  

Last few years we’ve managed to scrounge as well as thin our own property, so heat has been more or less free, depending on how one counts one’s time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

however it lands .....

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dad and stepmom in WI still cut block and split all their wood for winter, both in their 70's.  Helps having lots of oak and hickory if you have to. Once it's blocked and split it needs to be covered or it's turning into a rot pile and loosing all btu value.

We used to sell firewood for family fun money as a kid, 700 face cords per semi or something like that, all split by hand. It hurts just thinking of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some years I cut my own.  Others we have it delivered.  Depends on how many trees get knocked down after a storm or two.  Usually 2 - 2.5 cords last the winter for us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We live in a 120 year old Florida house, it does get cold in Florida. My favorite fire wood is Australian pine... clean , dense wood that burns longer than oak which is # 2 on my list. We have 2 efficient fireplace wood burning inserts, every 5 years or so I have to fire them both up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My all time favorite woodsmoke aroma is eucalyptus!  In SoCal they'd planted acres and acres of euc to be used as railroad ties until it was discovered there was very little rot resistance in the wood. In the 70s old groves of eucalypti were being bulldozed to clear land for housing tracts and the oily wood was sold as very pricey firewood.

Riding my bike through the South Bay on my way to work several houses would bring a smile to my nose on those chilly winter mornings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the wood thing for years, stacked a delivered cord of seasoned split hardwood.   After a while, as we got busier, it became a bit tedious and time consuming, so we've had a gas log for the past 15 or so years, don't miss the wood smell or soot, or ashes....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ashes suck but I find the flames mesmerizing and comforting. Gas just does the same thing all the time and doesn't throw the same heat as a mix of ash, beech and oak. Mesquite gives good heat but the house in Tucson is gladly/sadly sold now.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do wood inside and gas in an outside firepit. Best of both worlds.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, RImike said:

I envy this operation: 

 

fantastic.  he is being modest "eliminated 4 of 12 steps...a win"  but the 4 steps he eliminated are hard, time consuming work.  if he "weights" the steps he's got a huge win.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to burn firewood from my beach.  We get a lot of drift logs (Douglas Fir, Alder, Western Red Cedar, Maple) from up the Skagit River (that can extend 75' from the shore after a storm) and loose logs from the commercial Douglas Fir log rafts being formed up in the bay.  They used to search the shore for loose logs, and apparently WA State can claim anything over 6" in diameter, but I don't see that happening anymore.  I like the logs with bark still on them that have not started to deteriorate.  I would occasionally use a grappling hook to snag the best passing logs.

I would cut the logs to length for my Lopi wood burning fireplace, split them by hand with a sledge hammer and wedges, and then leave them out in the weather for at least a year for the salt to leach out, to help not corrode the metal stove (creosote was never a problem).  I used a Stihl chainsaw with a 36" long bar, to lengthen the time between sharpenings and a 7' peevee to rotate the logs.  I tried to have at least 6 cords of firewood stored for the winter, and kept about a cord of un-salted firewood under cover at a time.

But. . . I've gotten older, tired of the process and have replaced the wood burning stove with a natural gas fireplace.  I do like the remote.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, chester said:

fantastic.  he is being modest "eliminated 4 of 12 steps...a win"  but the 4 steps he eliminated are hard, time consuming work.  if he "weights" the steps he's got a huge win.

 

Very ingenious and highly skilled fabricator!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are very fortunate to have 2 fireplaces in our house.  Tge ine in the living room is what you would expect to find in a 50/ year old ranch house. We converted it to gas when we. Bought the place 28 years ago and last year out in a new gas unit with remote start.  Very nice.

Tge other one is a raised hearth fieldstone thing that the people we bought the house from had done when they turned a 3 season room into a year round family room.  That’s our wood burner.  It’s basically gets Fall and early Spring use. Seldom in the dead of winter as it socks too much heated air out the chimney.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a wood burning fireplace insert and in the winter we it provides plenty of heat in our small home right now I am gathering up the branches and cut up downed trees on the property to stack in the wood shed...my daughters dropped of my grandsons and took their mom to lunch so I turned a 8yr old, a 10 and 2 12 year old loose with a ATV and Trailer to bring the wood up to the shed...the boys love to split wood and needle each other about how many swings it takes to split....they then ate every hotdog I could cook and entire chocolate cake and drank a gallon of milk...when their moms showed to pick them up they bitched at me because the boys were filthy...I said you are welcome...they didn't look at a video screen all day.....its great to be King....  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, billy backstay said:

Did the wood thing for years, stacked a delivered cord of seasoned split hardwood.   After a while, as we got busier, it became a bit tedious and time consuming, so we've had a gas log for the past 15 or so years, don't miss the wood smell or soot, or ashes....

gramps place above Vancouver has a wood burning  fireplace in the main house, but in the two  rustic guest cabins they have pellet stoves for their only sources of heat. They are small cabins at round 1900sf 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wood warms you three times, when you cut it, when you split and when you burn it... 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 times, shoveling out the ash....

grew up with wood heat, current house has two gas fireplaces, miss the ambiance but that's about all. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, crankcall said:

4 times, shoveling out the ash....

grew up with wood heat, current house has two gas fireplaces, miss the ambiance but that's about all. 

Ash vaccums are quick but yes tedious.  It is why I only burn 1-2 face cords a year.  Ambiance the smell. But the house heats with oil nicely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2020 at 8:57 PM, cyclone said:

B13CD550-6341-4F00-A070-A8B84431CB3D.thumb.jpeg.bff0a683a7ee82abc89f9925aa907fe6.jpeg

We burn about two and a half cords each winter. I buy split wood from our arborist. It seasons in a pile for a year then goes into the wood shed in early summer. Nothing wrong with cutting and splitting yourself but there’s only so much time. I’m convinced that having a fire wards off seasonal mood issues. Our particular wood heater is a Finnish design.

Is that box above the mantel with the keystoned crown a bake oven?

What a beautiful hearth!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Willin' said:

Is that box above the mantel with the keystoned crown a bake oven?

It can be after the fire dies down but it’s mostly a secondary combustion space. The heater was designed and built by these guys https://mainewoodheat.com/

It sits above a cinder block enclosure in the basement where all the ashes go. Only one clean out per year. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that looks functional. Out here in SoCal fireplaces are decorative, the designers don't care about function. I've stopped using mine as it loses draft unless the fire is vigorous and pushed up against the back wall it smokes up the house. That large thermal mass keeps the house warm long after the fire dies down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, longy said:

Yes, that looks functional. Out here in SoCal fireplaces are decorative, the designers don't care about function. I've stopped using mine as it loses draft unless the fire is vigorous and pushed up against the back wall it smokes up the house. That large thermal mass keeps the house warm long after the fire dies down.

The worst part is those stupid flues never seal completely so you lose heat through them all winter long. A wood burning stove insert can completely transform those things into functional and much more efficient fireplaces that are sealed when you're no using them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, cyclone said:

It can be after the fire dies down but it’s mostly a secondary combustion space. The heater was designed and built by these guys https://mainewoodheat.com/

It sits above a cinder block enclosure in the basement where all the ashes go. Only one clean out per year. 

 

secondary combustion meaning you can lay a fire in as well as and at the same time as the fireplace?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chester said:

secondary combustion meaning you can lay a fire in as well as and at the same time as the fireplace?

The fire stays in the lower chamber. The flame passes through a wide slot between the chambers then gets redirected in the top portion as in this picture of a different installation.

D9CC0A18-A06D-425C-823C-D533B7AAFCC0.thumb.jpeg.66e499f321eca84ff17a1a75f7d1b9ee.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/13/2020 at 5:57 PM, Gong Show said:

Bark side up.

Bark off is best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Growing up I helped the parents stack 12-15 cord every winter. My brothers and I would compete to see who could get the most in a wheelbarrow and then navigate down the sketchy ladder ramp into the basement. Biggest hurdle was the cement ramp going up right at the bottom of the ladder you just went down. 
 

the first house my wife and I bought had a little wood stove in the kitchen. With the right fan placement it would heat the entire house. 
 

the house we are in now has a massive beehive oven. It had been walled over and only uncovered 10 odd years ago by a previous owner. There is much debate about what it’s going to take to get it functional again. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2020 at 11:28 PM, BravoBravo said:

We live in a 120 year old Florida house, it does get cold in Florida. My favorite fire wood is Australian pine... clean , dense wood that burns longer than oak which is # 2 on my list. We have 2 efficient fireplace wood burning inserts, every 5 years or so I have to fire them both up. 

We use local Aussie pine for kindling to get things started, before moving onto the red gum

When we were in New Zealand the wood guy suggested Tea Tree.  It takes some heat to get it going but once it started glowing the heat was amazing and often there would be enough coals in the morning to get the pine burning without a match.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mgs said:

Growing up I helped the parents stack 12-15 cord every winter. My brothers and I would compete to see who could get the most in a wheelbarrow and then navigate down the sketchy ladder ramp into the basement. Biggest hurdle was the cement ramp going up right at the bottom of the ladder you just went down. 
 

the first house my wife and I bought had a little wood stove in the kitchen. With the right fan placement it would heat the entire house. 
 

the house we are in now has a massive beehive oven. It had been walled over and only uncovered 10 odd years ago by a previous owner. There is much debate about what it’s going to take to get it functional again. 

like this?  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@chester

Yeah, but the brick is better shape than the video. The issue we think is the flue. Also, as it is now the fireplace is in the room behind the oven. 
 

the supporting structure in the basement is just massive. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, mgs said:

@chester

Yeah, but the brick is better shape than the video. The issue we think is the flue. Also, as it is now the fireplace is in the room behind the oven. 
 

the supporting structure in the basement is just massive. 

good luck.  it would be super cool if you get it up and running

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, chester said:

good luck.  it would be super cool if you get it up and running

Works pretty well as a liquor cabinet...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/15/2020 at 6:03 PM, billy backstay said:

Wood warms you three times, when you cut it, when you split and when you burn it... 

 

I forgot, it's really 4 times.  Cutting, Splitting, Stacking and Burning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a fireplace but it's mostly just to look at and doesn't do much to actually heat the room, let alone the house. But I enjoy lighting it a few times per year.

18 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

I forgot, it's really 4 times.  Cutting, Splitting, Stacking and Burning.

There are two others for me: hauling from where I cut it and hauling from where I stacked it.

I'm renting this next weekend:

Nifty-Lift-TD34TN.png?w=480&ssl=1

My general policy is: if an oak branch touches the roof of a vehicle, it gets cut off where it grows from the main trunk. Years of pursuing this policy have resulted in that attachment point being far out of reach so I climb a ladder that's perched on a vehicle while carrying a pole saw. It finally occurred to me that the cost of renting that thing could quickly be dwarfed by the cost of one fall from a ladder.

Also, no more getting the pole saw stuck far out of reach like this:

polesawtree.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom Ray, We've all seen your pictures of you hanging precariously from dubious lifting equipment, so one ponders if you are not, in fact, competing for a Darwin Award!! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/15/2020 at 11:44 PM, VWAP said:

homesteading-round-wood-piles_1024x1024.

I used to stack my firewood like that when I first moved to Poland.  It's quite a common method here.  

Now I just stack it along the long garage wall outside.  The eaves help protect it.  It doesn't look as cool that way, but it's easier.  

Oh, BTW, my house here is about 1500 sq ft.  It's only my wife and I, and people ask us why we have such a big house for 2 people.  It isn't uncommon for a family of 4 here to share a 500-900 sq ft apartment or house.  Anything more than 2500 sq ft is considered a mansion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I nominate this for most bad ass homemade log splitter, not mine. Built in the 50's, originally had a Wisconsin engine with an updraft carburetor. Parts are long ago not available for the valve or hydraulic cylinder. Coolest part is it will both retract and extend hands free! Freeing up your hands to do something potentially stupid while its moving.

 

20201019_080344.jpg

20201019_090851.jpg

20201019_090827.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

IOh, BTW, my house here is about 1500 sq ft.  It's only my wife and I, and people ask us why we have such a big house for 2 people.  It isn't uncommon for a family of 4 here to share a 500-900 sq ft apartment or house.  Anything more than 2500 sq ft is considered a mansion.

 

We went from a 2,400 SF Ranch to a 1,400 SF one, and it's more than all we need.  3 bdrms and 2 path, so both daughters can visit with their spouse or SO.  Never before had a 2 car garage, or full walkout basement, so it's way better in many ways except for the waterfront with a big dock, that we left.  Still have a riverview, which is nice.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I new a guy who built a  splitter based on a large cast fly wheel.  can't remember the power but the wheel revoleved every 2 seconds (?), there was the head of a splitting maul welded to the wheel which passed through a plate on which you set log section.  it worked a treat but the potential for disaster to the stupid or careless was immense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2020 at 6:39 PM, hdra said:

First year with a house and a woodstove - bought dry split wood, guy (and his badass mom) dumped 3 cords in a big pile next to our woodshed, we stacked it.  Will see what we do for next season - hoping to be able to cut at least some of our wood from the property in the future.

Not trying to "out" you, but are you in Friday Harbor?  We recently got a couple of cords dropped off (stove-length, split, seasoned fir and madrone), by a guy and his badass mother.  I later stacked it.  This year we also had to drop a couple of dying fir trees and I had them cut and split, later hauling off and stacking the firewood.  Smaller stuff like downed branches I will chainsaw and hand-split but anything bigger than a couple feet in diameter (especially if it's full of knots) I will call a guy with a splitter.  When I was young I would cut/split/stack several cords a year, but these days I'm older, smarter(?), and not so poor.  I'm considering getting my own splitter, but I spent a summer working in a sawmill and developed a healthy fear of the machinery -- lots of examples hobbling around.

Fireplace is a Vermont Castings built-in, plus a wood stove in the garage / workshop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2020 at 6:12 AM, Willin' said:

My all time favorite woodsmoke aroma is eucalyptus!  In SoCal they'd planted acres and acres of euc to be used as railroad ties until it was discovered there was very little rot resistance in the wood. In the 70s old groves of eucalypti were being bulldozed to clear land for housing tracts and the oily wood was sold as very pricey firewood.

Riding my bike through the South Bay on my way to work several houses would bring a smile to my nose on those chilly winter mornings.

in the 1980's there was a big freeze that hit the local eucalyptus trees.  Most recovered, but lots were cut down and I ended up with several cords of big rounds, 2-3 ft dia.  Damn, you do *not* want to split those things across the rings!  I quickly discovered that they split much easier when when the maul blade is parallel with the rings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Google search dangerous wood splitting machine. Some are genius, some are nuts. Like the one in this video that starts at 1:45.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, bmiller said:

Google search dangerous wood splitting machine. Some are genius, some are nuts. Like the one in this video that starts at 1:45.

 

 

JFC!!  That is very dangerous!  One split ejecting logs nearly clocks him right in the balls/nutsack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could watch the first one all day... but that second guy who is in the picture above, what the hell? Not only does that seem insane and I'm surprised he's not dead yet, he's also wearing crocs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But you gotta love his capstan and ramp to get those big ass blocks up there.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, valis said:

Not trying to "out" you, but are you in Friday Harbor?  We recently got a couple of cords dropped off (stove-length, split, seasoned fir and madrone), by a guy and his badass mother.  I later stacked it.  This year we also had to drop a couple of dying fir trees and I had them cut and split, later hauling off and stacking the firewood.  Smaller stuff like downed branches I will chainsaw and hand-split but anything bigger than a couple feet in diameter (especially if it's full of knots) I will call a guy with a splitter.  When I was young I would cut/split/stack several cords a year, but these days I'm older, smarter(?), and not so poor.  I'm considering getting my own splitter, but I spent a summer working in a sawmill and developed a healthy fear of the machinery -- lots of examples hobbling around.

Fireplace is a Vermont Castings built-in, plus a wood stove in the garage / workshop.

We are in Friday Harbor - assume you got the wood from Ken McCutcheon?  We just moved here this summer because of COVID.  The boat we work on is laid up, and the boat we've lived on when not working for the last 5 years or so is on the hard in Trini with no way to go and get her.  Got a couple of kayaks to get out on the water this year, but definitely feeling the sailing itch right now!  Nice change of pace getting to do some gardening and blackberry clearing, and gotta say that a wood fire in a glass front stove is a lot cozier than our little Refleks diesel on the boat :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, bmiller said:

Google search dangerous wood splitting machine. Some are genius, some are nuts. Like the one in this video that starts at 1:45.

 

Kinda wish I had that first one this past weekend. I hand split about forty logs. We had a drought of fires in the house due to a small child but now that he's older we have re-filled the wood rack and even created an overflow area, we're ready to light some fires this Winter and my shoulders and arms are a happy sore.

I even got to pull out the Husqy and cut a dozen logs that we picked up that were too long. Not often enough a Husqy with an 18" bar gets to do any cutting in Park City.  I may have to take it up the hill to some trails that had some recent blow downs.

All the wood is cast offs from neighbors who for some reason don't want to burn the wood so they leave it by the road for others to take.  Works for us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, billy backstay said:

Tom Ray, We've all seen your pictures of you hanging precariously from dubious lifting equipment, so one ponders if you are not, in fact, competing for a Darwin Award!! :lol:

It's fair to wonder. A friend parked his motorhome in my driveway in 2018 and now wants to move it. Branches grew down, trapping it in. I climbed my little ladder with my pole saw and cut down the half dozen or so branches that were in the way. Almost fell once.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winner.  First of all, a firewood machinery vid with click bait...WFD.  And the guy in the first clip splits wood from the comfort of his lawn chair...that's what i'm talking about. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing will give you a better appreciation for machinery pinch point dangers than watching the various death and dismemberment machines shown in these videos. My homebrew splitter will definitely feature a minimum 8" aperture. No crushed digits, hands, feet, arms, legs or even heads for me, thank you very much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2020 at 3:42 PM, bmiller said:

Google search dangerous wood splitting machine. Some are genius, some are nuts. Like the one in this video that starts at 1:45.

 

Wtf? HE'S even afraid of it!

Points out the number one safety rule for a wood splitter: Get in the HABIT of grabbing/holding the logs on the sides, never on top, or else you will eventually get complacent and have a real hard time flipping anyone off

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites