astro

Should I dump my music CDs?

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Hundreds of them that I don't listen to anymore.

They take up space while I can stream anything I want anytime on almost any device.

Is it time?

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46 minutes ago, astro said:

Is it time?

what's a CD ?

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i ripped and copied to sd card. copied to phone. can plug phone into stereo if so inclined.

i dont stream music.

 

kept cd's, though

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7 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

ripped and copied to sd card.

Got 70Gb Itunes music plus CDs not ripped.

Itunes music stored locally is not worth the storage space it occupies, as cheap as that is.

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Live and alternative versions are often not available through the streams. I kept my discs, and DATs, and tape. 

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2 hours ago, astro said:

Hundreds of them that I don't listen to anymore.

They take up space while I can stream anything I want anytime on almost any device.

Is it time?

Think about it. they can join all that vinyl in landfill .

 

 

:tumble:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ask yourself if you are ever going to play them again and if the answer is no I would suggest donating them to your local college/community radio station where they will either be added to the library or resold for funding. 

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I withdraw thousands of CD's and DVD's from the library every year, we try to sell them, together with the boxes and boxes of donated CD's and DVD's

in our charity book sales.

No one will even pay a dollar.

So..whatever you do..please dont donate them to the Library.

OP shops might take them?

Better idea..get creative and build a huge silver cocky in your veggie patch with them. 

instructions below

https://seaneavery.com/section/130105-Sculpture.html

Seriously beautiful and you've got nothing better to do

Artist Turns Old CDs Into Amazing Sculptures Instead Of Throwing Them Away  | Bored Panda

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1 hour ago, Shortforbob said:

Think about it. they can join all that vinyl in landfill .

The big difference between vinyl and CDs is that vinyl doesn't degrade (appreciably) just on sitting.  CDs do.  My vinyl will still be playable 100 years from now, but the CDs will have degraded to the point that they cannot be read.  I'll keep my vinyl, CDs get ripped to digital.

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38 minutes ago, bplipschitz said:

The big difference between vinyl and CDs is that vinyl doesn't degrade (appreciably) just on sitting.  CDs do.  My vinyl will still be playable 100 years from now, but the CDs will have degraded to the point that they cannot be read.  I'll keep my vinyl, CDs get ripped to digital.

I know CDrs degrade but do CDs? Just curious, they are encased in polycarbonate and were pressed while the Rs are written much like a floppy or hard drive.  They do have some value as polycarbonate is (or was) valuable and worth recycling.  I am keeping mine, because things change. 

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I find CD sound quality is generally far far better than rlpped versions, that said, for the cars and the factory I stream via Bluetooth, but I have a dedicated listening system at home with a German amp, British speakers and British badged CD player as my old Japanese Marantz KI Signature player doesn’t want to read anything anymore. Awesome to choose a disc, pop it in and close my eyes and get lost in the music. I can simultaneously play a track from iTunes and if you switch between the CD and the ripped version it is like night and day.  

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well you can ship them to me!    i took all my cd's and got rid of the jewel cases,  i then stored the cds in three ring binders with cd sleeves, 6 to a page, dbl sided...   took the cover pages from the jewel boxes and slid those over the cd's , definitely makes storage easier...

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

well you can ship them to me!    i took all my cd's and got rid of the jewel cases,  i then stored the cds in three ring binders with cd sleeves, 6 to a page, dbl sided...   took the cover pages from the jewel boxes and slid those over the cd's , definitely makes storage easier...

I probably have 100 lbs of them...  and 100 lbs of movie DVD's as well.

Pay the postage and you can have 'em all.

I think I will just take the lot to Goodwill once the lines die down.

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If you're happy listening to that compressed shit you get off the web then get rid of them.

If you care about sound quality however...

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Get yourself one of these and copy all of them to it..    It is going to be tedious and will take some time, but in the end you'll be happy you did it.

image.png.30a4243be7107247c9e872d24ed59b1a.png

 

 

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get them copied to vinyl ;)

 

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I collect cds, they are so inexpensive they're almost free and have digital sound quality.

I run a bunch of old school sony 400 cd stackers for storage. They are also inexpensive.

CDs in the stackers are set up by the artist's name and albums in released order.

Then they get played through an old school analog system (JBL 4435s, Midas XL42 preamp/eq, Bryston power,)  lets you clearly hear the difference between an amazing dynamic recording and a highly compressed non-dynamic album.

Eventually, I will add in an online digital feed and also rip the CDs.

But I really like playing entire albums.

 

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you are crazy to get rid of them.

1. MP3 compression sucks.  Try a CD and click to an MP3 version.  HUGE difference in the sound. For example Sweet Judy Blue Eyes by CSN

2. wait until they come up with a less compressed version of music as memory, storage and bandwidth gets cheap.  iTunes and others will charge you to buy them all over again.

3. vinyl is hot.  CD is bound to follow for all the reasons it crushed records 40 years ago.

4.  a lot of that stuff will never be found again.  Something fun to fire up when you got your buds over for beers.  Like Clarence Clemons (played sax on Bruce Springsteen albums) which is special on its own.

5. If the recording nazis and their lawyers try to sue you, you can prove you have a physical copy which means you can make copies for yourself.  Could save you legal bills.

6. Something to give the kids.   You cannot transfer iTune collections to family members.

7. Service catalogs are extremely limited for many artists.

 

Cull the truly useless (WTF was I thinking/smoking when I bought THAT?).   Offer those to buddies first. Box the rest in large plastic containers.  You will be glad 20 years from now when you open those treasures and they sound as good as the day you bought them even though your hearing has gone to shit. It gives you something to relive after you are retired and have nothing to do.

You can also COPY to chip or 2.  Make sure not turn into MP3 or any other compression.  Pure file transfer.  but hold onto the source.

 

whenever I need a classic, I go to Amazon and buy the CD new or used rather than the soft copy. Usually cheaper too.

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This. Have well over 1000 LP’s & 300-400 CD,s. Homey don’t listen to music on my phone. 

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10 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

i ripped and copied to sd card. copied to phone. can plug phone into stereo if so inclined.

i dont stream music.

 

kept cd's, though

I did the same thing. I also have Pandora with a mix of 50's through the 90's music. I do  not own any 60's surf or Motown so I really like to hear them. Early Rock is so simple and pure.

I had never heard of Junior Brown when this medley popped up on my Pandora. It's one of fav picking songs now.
Next time you have a party, you need to have this in the line up. Of course this is the live version 6:22 long. 

Here is the recorded version

 

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You can still appreciate decent artwork with most CD's vs zilch for anything downloaded. Have kept all of mine but access the tunes via a WD hard drive sitting on the home network and a Sonos system

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I keep mine just as a backup to everything that is already ripped.  I pitched all of the jewel cases probably 10+ years ago

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Years ago when I had access to top quality audio equipment it was hard to hear the difference between cd and mp3 - but I ripped at a minimum of 256, most streamed/ripped stuff is 128 IIRC and yes it's like fm vs am radio quality. 

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I kept my cassette tapes....... nothing better for telltales on the shrouds. 

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Got a couple of hundred of those too. Nothing to play em on though. 

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You can send them to me. I gave away over 300 CDs and 500 Lps 7 years ago, and I miss every one of them.

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Well I am not an audiophile.

Some of my friends are into the high end stuff but after a certain quality I can't pick the difference.  Beyond 256 bit rate is about it for me.  For now I am just going to procrastinate most likely and do nothing. 

I only looked at them when trying to find a RW-cd with a video on it.  Irreplaceable video of fishing for coral trout in the very late 1970's on the Great Barrier Reef.  Found it, but it has degraded and will not play with out halting frequently.  Gave it a cleanup with car polish to minimise scratches but starting to believe it is degradation.

Googled it and discovered software utilities for sale that say they can save them.

Anyone ever used software recovery tools for DVDs/CDs?   How did it go?

 

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I am ripping mine uncompressed slowly but surely. Most streams are not as hi if as I can play the digital files using my squeezbox system. I am also still buying CDs as needed as one cd can be ripped to uncompressed wav and then to everyone's iTunes. Just bought Stings live solo album "bring on the night" remastered. I also have a ton of stuff which won't be streamed as its too obscure.

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13 hours ago, Major Tom said:

I find CD sound quality is generally far far better than rlpped versions,.....

Awesome to choose a disc, pop it in and close my eyes and get lost in the music. I can simultaneously play a track from iTunes and if you switch between the CD and the ripped version it is like night and day.  

That's about how I feel about my vinyl, and have my Genesis (both Peter and Phil), Al Stewart, Alan Parsons Project, Supertramp, Pink Floyd, Gordon Lightfoot, Strawbs, Fleetwood Mac, Eagles,  and various former leads i.e. Peter Gabriel, Bob Welch....  May be a psychological disorder but I can't see fit to let them go. It's not as of most of the aforementioned can't be found. Even YouTube has a whole lot of the older stuff available. I guess that, just sometimes, it's nice to hear the subtle tones and original compression of vinyl.    

 

Time to get some sleep.

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Don't throw away you old CD's.  they are your collection, part of who you are.  Just don't throw that away.

Ripping them to MP3 is not as bad as other posters have said.  Just adjust the level of compression to what suits you.  Windows Media Player lets you change the compression level and honestly, with an average sound system a higher (lower?) level of compression doesn't kill the sound quality as much as some people would leave you to believe.

But keep your hard copies. It's part of who you are, Gives authorities proof of ownership of the rights to listen if needed, and one day you might want to build a bad ass sound system and play those tunes from the original source, just like the cool folks are doing with LP's these days....

I still actually buy music on CD. I like owning the physical thing that I have bought.  First thing I do once I buy an album is rip it to a higher quality MP3 so I can add it to my memory stick in the car and listen to while I drive.  Makes no sense what so ever but keeps me happy.

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As Chris in Santa Cruz mentioned, when you rip a CD you don't *have* to compress it.  You can copy the original bits exactly, with no compression loss at all.  Archive the files in this format, and you can play them as-is (at least with some players), or take those raw files and compress then however you prefer.  The raw files are much bigger than the compressed ones, but these days storage is cheap.

Me, I don't mind the compression, mostly because I listen in the car or other less acoustically-pristine environments.

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image.jpeg.aff3dd8e57621ea0342523c31982f297.jpeg

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I wasn't kidding. I will pay shipping..... (Assuming you don't have a collection of Opera, Rap, and CW..... )

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Don't forget that as you age (what???) your ears will start to go to shit, so you lose the ability to detect those subtle differences.  It sucks.

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i love all the old farts talking about music fidelity.... most of us have some hearing loss so worrying is silly...

Astro, what part of the south are you in?

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16 hours ago, astro said:

Well I am not an audiophile.

Some of my friends are into the high end stuff but after a certain quality I can't pick the difference.  Beyond 256 bit rate is about it for me.  For now I am just going to procrastinate most likely and do nothing. 

I only looked at them when trying to find a RW-cd with a video on it.  Irreplaceable video of fishing for coral trout in the very late 1970's on the Great Barrier Reef.  Found it, but it has degraded and will not play with out halting frequently.  Gave it a cleanup with car polish to minimise scratches but starting to believe it is degradation.

Googled it and discovered software utilities for sale that say they can save them.

Anyone ever used software recovery tools for DVDs/CDs?   How did it go?

 

Big difference between pressed and RW = the 1st are physically imprinted and then sealed in polycarbonate, the 2nd are burned with a laser - and those are the ones that will deteriorate over time.  As for recovery, the only thing that can be done is eliminate scratches.  Much like recovering a hard drive except the bits can be rewritten to reconstruct files - for a cd or dvd  it just is what it is.  Permanent.  Or it was 15 years ago when I gave a talk to a big users group on how they are made, I doubt anything has changed.  I have lost music I stored on CDrs, just from time - out of sight and out of mind until it was too late. 

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30 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

Astro, what part of the south are you in?

Eastern Australia.  Latitude 27-ish.

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21 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

Big difference between pressed and RW = the 1st are physically imprinted and then sealed in polycarbonate, the 2nd are burned with a laser - and those are the ones that will deteriorate over time.  As for recovery, the only thing that can be done is eliminate scratches.  Much like recovering a hard drive except the bits can be rewritten to reconstruct files - for a cd or dvd  it just is what it is.  Permanent.  Or it was 15 years ago when I gave a talk to a big users group on how they are made, I doubt anything has changed.  I have lost music I stored on CDrs, just from time - out of sight and out of mind until it was too late. 

Well I guess mine video in probably gone too.  There is a chance that a family member could have a copy, same recording age though.

I'll try another fine cut and polish before I give up.

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2 hours ago, astro said:

Eastern Australia.  Latitude 27-ish.

ok, i guess i won't come by and pick them up,  I'd like to , but it's a long flight..    you can download for free CDeX,  to burn them to mp3s...

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2 hours ago, astro said:

Well I guess mine video in probably gone too.  There is a chance that a family member could have a copy, same recording age though.

I'll try another fine cut and polish before I give up.

Always lay them label side down when not in a sleeve or case - minute scratches will hose them and the writeables scratch much easier than the pressed factory ones. 

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2 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

ok, i guess i won't come by and pick them up,  I'd like to , but it's a long flight..    you can download for free CDeX,  to burn them to mp3s...

Yeah, I have ripped most of them.  That means I have an 70Gb itunes database I don't use either.

Seems to me that it is not attractive to store any music that you can stream.

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I keep all mine and 500+ vinyls. I don't have anything to play them on, but I keep them. 

 

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On 10/11/2020 at 11:23 AM, Major Tom said:

I find CD sound quality is generally far far better than rlpped versions, that said, for the cars and the factory I stream via Bluetooth, but I have a dedicated listening system at home with a German amp, British speakers and British badged CD player as my old Japanese Marantz KI Signature player doesn’t want to read anything anymore. Awesome to choose a disc, pop it in and close my eyes and get lost in the music. I can simultaneously play a track from iTunes and if you switch between the CD and the ripped version it is like night and day.  

Funny you say that, I've done the same thing and cannot tell at all. Tried this test on my father, as well, without telling  him.

Higher bit rate, less scooped sound system? I dunno.

- DSK

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16 hours ago, Borax Johnson said:

Try playing any of that streeming stuff offshore. Maybe I am an outlier.

Or a sailor.

i have 6000+ songs on a 100gb card i have stuck in a tablet bluetoothed to a little oontz speaker..   on my bucket list is to listen to every song 

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I'm of the opinion that I don't want to pay a subscription to listen to my music. (I also detest the subscription model for software.) I also don't want to be at the mercy of my internet connection (not to mention that I prefer to NOT be connected 24/7).

I have over 2000 records (and a number of turntables on which to play them) and only around 300 CDs. The CDs I just copy over to my HD. The records are all ripped (using Audacity on a Linux box) and saved as high-res FLAC files. Select choices from those then go onto my iPod and my phone and my iPad and my laptop for work.

Records take up a lot of space for storage, of course. The CDs, not so much (although most are in a 200 disk changer). But once I purchase the album, it's mine and I don't have to pay for it again next month. And if my internet connection goes down or I'm in a location too remote to pick up cell service, I've got music.

The downside to this vs a subscription is that I have access to ONLY the music I've purchased. But that's why I have a radio.

I wouldn't toss the CDs.

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I buy and play vinyl still. Its easy. Keeps you young to use physical dexterity to clean and play a record. Use it or lose it.

Its a myth that when you get older you still cant tell the difference between hi-fi and mid/low-fi. Its a justification for throwing away your youth and passion for music. Cowboy up old farts. Play some records.

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On 10/11/2020 at 12:24 PM, Foreverslow said:

wait until they come up with a less compressed version of music as memory, storage and bandwidth gets cheap

How much does a 4 TB hard drive + a backup drive cost? $100 each?

A CD album ripped to FLAC format (NOT MP3) is about 275 MB on average.... So that's about 14,500 CDs by my math. So with 1 primary and 1 off site backup stored at your work/friends house etc. = $200 / 14,500 = 1.4 cents / CD.

Compare that to the cost of streaming .... only $9.99/month on Spotify. And the artists get peanuts.

 

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I have been in the audio production business for over forty years - when I first started it was vinyl - 2 turntables, mixing to 1/4' tape.

Even back then I realised that all vinyl discs were specifically equalised to get the best results when played back with a stylus - they are not true copies of the master tapes.

CDs are better but at 16bit 44.1kHz they only go up to 20kHz and then cut off completely whereas 1/4' machines we used to align so they were flat in response up to about 30kHz. It is all those harmonics above human hearing that we perceive and like about non-digital recordings..

Now I listen to Tidal - it's a streaming service that at it's worst is CD quality, however many files are Master quality - that is the same quality that comes out of the mastering studio. You cannot compare these to mp4as from iTunes. A bit more expensive and slightly limited in range, but really worth it if you really appreciate good audio.

Rant over.

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12 minutes ago, mccroc said:

It is all those harmonics above human hearing that we perceive and like about non-digital recordings..

I've been curious about this claim, are there proper tests showing that people can tell the difference if sounds above 20 KHz are not filtered out?

I know *I* can't tell the difference, as weak high-frequency harmonics will be lost in my background tinnitus (too many years of playing in rock bands, standing next to the drummer.)  Although, sometimes high-frequency sounds will intermodulate with my tinnitus tones, producing a lower-frequency product, much like an old-fashioned ring-modulator.  It's not a very musical effect.

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2 hours ago, valis said:

I've been curious about this claim, are there proper tests showing that people can tell the difference if sounds above 20 KHz are not filtered out?

I know *I* can't tell the difference, as weak high-frequency harmonics will be lost in my background tinnitus (too many years of playing in rock bands, standing next to the drummer.)  Although, sometimes high-frequency sounds will intermodulate with my tinnitus tones, producing a lower-frequency product, much like an old-fashioned ring-modulator.  It's not a very musical effect.

A good question as to whether there are studies that have shown this, but certainly we easily demonstrated it in studios in the 1980s by having a full frequency recording and then putting a low pass filter at 20kHz, and everyone immediately noticed the difference. I guess it works in two ways, one is the missing frequencies above 20kHz, and the other is the lower harmonics of those frequencies along with distortion. If the higher frequencies are not there, neither are the harmonics. Funnily enough we always felt in the early days of CDs that they sounded "thinner" than vinyl and/or master tapes. Maybe because lower frequencies, sub-harmonic frequencies are missing as well.

I also suffer from tinnitus - luckily I haven't suffered the symptoms you are describing.Whenever i am in a good acoustic environment I can somehow filter out the tinnitus and just hear clearly what I need to hear. I am in audio post-production rather than music nowadays, which probably helps.

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All good, but the sound quality thing, although interesting and relevant ... over rated.

I was really enjoying music when it was played on a car radio with the windows down, and a loud exhaust.

After a certain point, there are diminishing returns on spending 10x the money on speakers with brands to impress people you don't like.

I too have tinnitus and recently a bass version of it comes and goes.  Music makes me forget about it.

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