Grrr...

Is it ok to furl... or not?

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Today while perusing craigslist I found a used sail that initially appears like it might fit my boat, and the seller wants literally next-to-nothing for it.  However, my boat is a roller furling.  I believe roller furling sails are generally cut with higher tacks (or not anymore?).  What makes a roller-furling sail a roller furling? Can any sail be a roller furling sail?  I have the ability to sew on my own sun-cover.  But I'm curious what problems I might run into if I were to purchase the sail and put it on.

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Biggest difference is the sun cover and having a luff tape that will fit the furler - if you can get those both on it for less than the cost of just buying a used sail of equivalent quality / wear then go for it.

If you're going to sail with the sail partially furled, having a foam or rope luff insert helps a lot for the first few wraps, after that roller furled sail shape is pretty shit no matter what - if it's just to have the sail in or out, then you don't need the luff pad.

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Grr,  I've raced for years on boats that had roller furling (J/109 and an S2 9.1) on which the genoas and jibs did not have a higher clew than a normal racing sail...the only really difference is the amount of "overlapping" layers down low, and less overlap up high, which may require different widths of suncover along the foot vs the leech to ensure protection when rolled up...If using the sail to race (as I did), then foam or rope insert on the luff is not so great, as you are really using the furler only to "douse" the sail during spin sets, or store it on the way out to/back from the race course.  If you're taking it down after racing, then no need for a sun cover either.

If your cruising with it, or lazy beercaning, then the foam/rope insert does allow a "better" sail shape when partially furled.  Note I say better, not good.

Crash

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4 hours ago, Crash said:

Grr,  I've raced for years on boats that had roller furling (J/109 and an S2 9.1) on which the genoas and jibs did not have a higher clew than a normal racing sail...the only really difference is the amount of "overlapping" layers down low, and less overlap up high, which may require different widths of suncover along the foot vs the leech to ensure protection when rolled up...If using the sail to race (as I did), then foam or rope insert on the luff is not so great, as you are really using the furler only to "douse" the sail during spin sets, or store it on the way out to/back from the race course.  If you're taking it down after racing, then no need for a sun cover either.

If your cruising with it, or lazy beercaning, then the foam/rope insert does allow a "better" sail shape when partially furled.  Note I say better, not good.

Crash

Depends also on the cut used on the sail, cross cut, bi radial tri radial etc. A tri radial holds quite good shape when reefed and then you trip into Genoa car track length because the car should come forward when partially furling ideally however many tracks are a little short or the cars not easily adjustable.

If the sail is almost a giveaway look carefully at shape, the best way to look at shape while not on the boat is to attach a block and tackle and tension at the sails head or clew with the other end  (tack or head)anchored to something solid and then grab the clew if you don't have the confidence to evaluate take it to a sailmaker.

If the sail is a little baggy in the luff the sailmaker may be able to flatten it some by hollowing out the luff when attaching the new luff tape for roller furler.

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8 hours ago, Grrr... said:

Today while perusing craigslist I found a used sail that initially appears like it might fit my boat, and the seller wants literally next-to-nothing for it.  However, my boat is a roller furling.  I believe roller furling sails are generally cut with higher tacks (or not anymore?).  What makes a roller-furling sail a roller furling? Can any sail be a roller furling sail?  I have the ability to sew on my own sun-cover.  But I'm curious what problems I might run into if I were to purchase the sail and put it on.

Clew height is in relation to Genoa track length 

With a roller jib , when you reef,  you must pull the Genoa leed forward 

a high clew gives you more available track length for reefing 

a  reefed deck sweeper will rapidly run out of track on most boats 

 

a high clew gives gives much better reaching performance 

roller sails at primarily all purpose cruising sails 

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Sails built to roller REEF are cut very flat. A 'normal' sail shape will, when reefed, have a very full/baggy middle with VERY tight leach & foot. A low clew just means you should re-position the jib car after reefing to achieve better sail shape. A high enuff clew will not require car moving, as sheet lead will stay the same, but this is quite high off the deck.  Consult your sailmaker. A sail can be made flatter by adding more luff curve, and clew height can be raised a bit by "rocking" the luff aft.

Any sail that fits on the furling system can be furled. But if you want to use just part of the sail, see above.

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6 minutes ago, longy said:

Sails built to roller REEF are cut very flat. A 'normal' sail shape will, when reefed, have a very full/baggy middle with VERY tight leach & foot. A low clew just means you should re-position the jib car after reefing to achieve better sail shape. A high enuff clew will not require car moving, as sheet lead will stay the same, but this is quite high off the deck.  Consult your sailmaker. A sail can be made flatter by adding more luff curve, and clew height can be raised a bit by "rocking" the luff aft.

Any sail that fits on the furling system can be furled. But if you want to use just part of the sail, see above.

You must have a long genoa track if you expect to close reach with a jib rolled to 50 percent 

a higher clew , all purpose  roller sail poles out well... very difficult to develop leech tension when  poled  out . When you do strap the leech down with fore and afterguy ,  you overload the pole and track with compression 

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